Author Topic: New type of student loans?  (Read 747 times)

MrsWolfeRN

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PrfromTexas

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Re: New type of student loans?
« Reply #1 on: October 22, 2018, 05:03:26 AM »
What we have here is only a number of educators who understand that that they should offer genuine education and instruction methods, with genuine future pay and advantages. Just consider: on the off chance that they neglect to give a decent training (the present model), their future rate will be lower. They have an enthusiasm for prosperity, and this is what is called disguised selfishness.
If you ask me, a retired professor, leading a quiet life in Texas, I will never defend educators in any case. Nor the authorities. False guarantees, yet putting students into monstrous and continuous obligation forever. This makes the previous life almost unsound with diminished possibilities for business,  great well-being, home possession (with the percentage of homeless), and so forth. An awful truth.
« Last Edit: October 22, 2018, 05:07:04 AM by PrfromTexas »

PrfromTexas

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Re: New type of student loans?
« Reply #2 on: October 22, 2018, 05:04:31 AM »
They have chosen they can't sit tight for our legislature to give a free instruction, so they will give that training now and gather their expenses and educational cost later. Extremely very exceptional. Further, this arrangement may likewise show the fact accommodated the "benefit of everyone".

seattlecyclone

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Re: New type of student loans?
« Reply #3 on: October 22, 2018, 02:48:38 PM »
Honestly, I really like this idea. It shifts a lot of the financial risk from the student to the institution. If the education enables a student to go on and earn a solid salary, the school is going to receive a decent return on its investment in that student. If not, the university has to write off their losses after a set time and the student isn't stuck with a giant albatross around their neck forever.

wordnerd

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Re: New type of student loans?
« Reply #4 on: October 22, 2018, 03:56:21 PM »
Honestly, I really like this idea. It shifts a lot of the financial risk from the student to the institution. If the education enables a student to go on and earn a solid salary, the school is going to receive a decent return on its investment in that student. If not, the university has to write off their losses after a set time and the student isn't stuck with a giant albatross around their neck forever.
I'm torn. Half of me completely agrees with you. And half of me worries that the consequence of this is the further transformation of education into a ROI generator. Schools will be incentized not to focus on music or classics or esoteric pursuits and instead add more business type classes. Some will argue this is a good thing. But, I know there are things I learned in college that made me happier, more complete individual and have not translated into one cent of earnings. If those studies don't live on in universities, where do they live?

marty998

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Re: New type of student loans?
« Reply #5 on: October 22, 2018, 04:14:17 PM »
I've seen this discussed before on the forum.... and I don't think the consensus was that it was a good idea.

I still go back and question why education is so expensive in the first place.

Then I saw a post elsewhere on the forum about someone weighing up a decision to be a college football coach earning several hundred thousand dollars a year.

Now it all makes sense.

seattlecyclone

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Re: New type of student loans?
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2018, 02:42:40 PM »
Honestly, I really like this idea. It shifts a lot of the financial risk from the student to the institution. If the education enables a student to go on and earn a solid salary, the school is going to receive a decent return on its investment in that student. If not, the university has to write off their losses after a set time and the student isn't stuck with a giant albatross around their neck forever.
I'm torn. Half of me completely agrees with you. And half of me worries that the consequence of this is the further transformation of education into a ROI generator. Schools will be incentized not to focus on music or classics or esoteric pursuits and instead add more business type classes. Some will argue this is a good thing. But, I know there are things I learned in college that made me happier, more complete individual and have not translated into one cent of earnings. If those studies don't live on in universities, where do they live?

I'm not so sure that would be the effect at all. The article said that this university varied the income percentage based on your course of study. Study engineering or medicine or another high-paying field and you'll only be stuck giving back a couple percent of your salary. Study something less profitable and you pay back a bigger percentage. The idea seems to be that the university sets the terms of the agreement such that they expect to make back about the same amount regardless of what you study. The university thus doesn't have any additional economic incentive to favor one subject over another. If you want to study art history or ancient Greek or whatever, the university would be happy to set you up with an appropriate payment plan for that.

And on the student's side, someone studying one of these subjects already knows it probably won't lead to a lucrative career. My guess would be that this system could make students more rather than less likely to study these things, as the financial downside is more limited than now where you owe a fixed dollar amount the second you sign up for the loan.