Author Topic: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on  (Read 2535 times)

shelivesthedream

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Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« on: October 13, 2018, 05:17:17 AM »
Our son is nearly six months old and will shortly start becoming mobile so we're reorganising our house a bit. We'll be living in the house until he's nearly 2.5 years old, so I'd really love to just do one re-org and then not have to think about it again. Does anyone have any tips for making our house a space that will be safe for our crawling infant but will enable our future toddler to be reasonably (and safely) independent? For example, we are planning to keep all his plastic eating stuff in a low cupboard (the one we currently have all the bleach in...) so in the future he can get it out and put it away himself.

Cranky

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #1 on: October 13, 2018, 06:19:55 AM »
Remember that you want to say "yes" whenever possible. So, the bleach goes up high! As does anything else that is dangerous, breakable, or precious.

Fix the book cases and dressers to the wall. Are there stove knobs that you need to cover? Will you want to gate off the kitchen and/or bathroom? Have you turned down the water temperature? (Can you do that there?) Take a hard look at any electric cords.

Basically, sit down on the floor and look around and think "What could I kill myself with?" LOL

Sibley

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2018, 06:25:34 PM »
Invite someone with a toddler to come over and see what the kid gets into that you don't want them to.

chaskavitch

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2018, 06:54:23 AM »
Our 2.5 year old still can't open the cupboards we put the child safety locks on, no matter how hard he tries, so those are helpful.  He can, however, now reach and unlock all of our exterior and interior doors.  If you have doors with round handles, this takes a lot longer, but if you have the lever-type handles, try to find a locking system for those.  Also, like Cranky said, cover your electrical outlets if you can, get baby gates BEFORE he falls down the stairs, etc.

He does love to throw things, too, so keep in mind any breakable decorations you have.  Nothing has been broken YET, but he's been chucking a beanie baby monkey at the ceiling pretty hard lately, and I'm worried for our picture frames, both on the walls and on our shelves.  I don't have recommendations on how to keep them safe, other than trying to teach him not to throw things indoors. Ha.


elliha

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2018, 07:30:17 AM »
Fix book cases, some dressers etc. to the walls, this can actually be a safety issue even for adults if you fall and instinctively grab something like this and it falls on top of you. People have been injured or even died from it, even adults. This must be fixed as well as other very dangerous things such as poisonous things or the oven not having a lock. Other than that I think it is much better to wait and see what the kid is interested in and if you need to do more but you don't really need to bring out the big guns for every kid. My daughter wouldn't touch a knife or scissors if they lay on the table, at the most I would look at her and say "Dangerous" and she would walk away from it. My son is much less careful. When they are very little you mostly you just need to make sure they don't eat small objects but that is hard to baby proof as such, you just need to keep on the look out. The reason I don't think you should "over-proof" your house is that it can a bit too many locks if you lock everything.

Cranky

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #5 on: October 15, 2018, 10:04:08 AM »
Oh, yeah. We got rid of the coffee table for about ten years.

bognish

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #6 on: October 15, 2018, 10:36:53 AM »
Tupperware and plastic items in the bottom drawers. Knives and glass items in the top drawers. If you want to put them to work unloading the dishwasher, we put utensils (forks, spoons, butter knives) in one of those removable holders so we could take it out and let kids empty the dishwasher utensil basket.

The fabric foldable storage bins work good for toys. No hard surfaces if the kid pulls it down on their head. Easy to put on the floor and have them fill back up to clean up before the next activity. We had 1 or 2 bins kid accessible that they could play with and get out. 1 or 2 bins out of site so we could mix up the toy rotation and keep things fresh.Typically if kids can't see the toys they dont remember they exist and dont ask to play with them. Annoying toys go in the out of site bin for 2 or 3 weeks to make sure they don't get asked for again before tossing in the trash. Many toys have "batteries that cannot be replaced".

nessness

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #7 on: October 15, 2018, 01:41:32 PM »
We installed a latch high up on the front door that the kids can't reach. I have a couple of acquaintances whose 2-3 year olds have gotten out of the house unnoticed.

Cranky

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #8 on: October 16, 2018, 08:07:14 AM »
I bought a box of those patches that attach with command strips for the lucky parents of my grandboy, and they have used them liberally since they are in a rental.

Heís 2.5 and now that he can put on his own shoes, he sees no reason why he shouldnít open the front door and make an exit.

When my own kids were that age, our baby proofing was fairly simple - we just didnít have a lot of stuff to begin with and it wasnít hard to put things out of reach. This time around itís been more challenging because we have so many more hazards to try and make inaccessible!

reeshau

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #9 on: October 16, 2018, 08:18:34 AM »

Also: The hearth of a fireplace (the place you sit on) always made me nervous.  All those hard corners and edges. 


We found a nice, custom foam cover for the hearth.  While I still cringed whenever "contact" happened, it did its job and nothing got hurt but feelings.  Best part was, it was removable for "fancy" times, as needed.

LiveLean

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #10 on: October 21, 2018, 04:58:01 AM »
Take a step back, breathe, and remember that most everything marketed for toddler safety today did not exist 30 years ago. And yet we all managed to get through our early years without killing ourselves.

Do the obvious -- gate/fence your swimming pool, if you have one, for instance - but don't obsess over it. Otherwise you'll end up bubble wrapping your house.

We have a rental property/second home that rents by the week in the summer and at least once a year someone will put those annoying outlet covers in every single one of our outlets. Those folks should just stay at home rather than renting houses.

katekat

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #11 on: October 21, 2018, 05:51:58 AM »
I'm 99% sure you'll know this already, SLTD -- and I'm super unqualified to give toddler advice -- but since outlet/socket covers have been mentioned a couple of times in this thread it's worth pointing out that what might be good advice internationally can be super bad advice for the UK!

British sockets are really really safe and commercial socket covers, if anything, can make them more dangerous: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/5039454/Electrical-socket-safety-covers-are-absurd-and-dangerous-say-engineers.html

elliha

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2018, 06:42:28 AM »
I'm 99% sure you'll know this already, SLTD -- and I'm super unqualified to give toddler advice -- but since outlet/socket covers have been mentioned a couple of times in this thread it's worth pointing out that what might be good advice internationally can be super bad advice for the UK!

British sockets are really really safe and commercial socket covers, if anything, can make them more dangerous: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/5039454/Electrical-socket-safety-covers-are-absurd-and-dangerous-say-engineers.html

The same is true in Sweden, houses built after 70s almost always have some kind of built in protection and even older houses may have them and the built in protection is better than the added stuff and outlets may be damaged by the extra covers. Some of the covers may also be swallowed by kids if they would manage to get them out anyway or the parent leaves them on the floor or something like that. It is much better to fit modern outlets in an older house than use the protectors, it is a relatively easy and cheap thing to do.

Cranky

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #13 on: October 21, 2018, 09:58:52 AM »
What childproofing items werenít available 30 years ago?

There are actually a lot of different kinds of outlet covers - some are designed to keep kids from unplugging things.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #14 on: October 21, 2018, 12:54:33 PM »
Thanks, all! I had heard about socket covers being un-recommended for the UK. There's nothing important that he could reach to unplug - just two lamps and a radio - and I might duct tape those plugs in if he seems curious.

We've got some stair gates, I've going to put an oven lock on and child lock three drawers in our kitchen. We have two small sideboards and two sets of shelves to fix to the wall. I'm going to to put a lock on our utility room door, on our cupboard under the stairs, and on the door of our joint study which is full of bookshelves, plugs and chokable objects. Other than that, seems like we're kind of good on stuff that might kill him and will just have to be alert to annoying stuff that he might break.

Cassie

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #15 on: October 21, 2018, 06:14:10 PM »
I wouldnít have anything out that will break your heart if it gets broken. Have some stuff out that you donít care about and teach him not to touch it. Of course put dangerous chemicals up high.

ysette9

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #16 on: October 21, 2018, 10:51:49 PM »
I feel like after making sure that outright poison isn’t accessible, and that they can’t pull anything on them to crush them, you may be able to wait and see how he turns out. My youngest is strong and dexterous and curious and gets into a lot. My oldest not at all. We never baby-proofed because we could just tell her “no” a few times and that was good. We also only have two stairs in the house which is enough to teach the baby how to go down butt/feet first and be safe.

Then again, my husband had a baby play date and was shocked at the ruckus and destruction from other people’s kids. If we had a more rambunctious brood it would be different.

Goldielocks

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #17 on: October 21, 2018, 11:20:23 PM »
Put metal bowls / pots in a low cupboard (with a wooden spoon).   That way, when he is exploring, you will know where he is when you hear the band strike up.  :0 JK because of course you will know where he is, but the idea to have things he can reach / touch without a "no" is a great one.

Add door lock (simple latch) up high on exterior doors that you need to be taller to reach.  Some kids are escape artists and run out the front door a lot.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #18 on: October 22, 2018, 12:31:34 AM »
How would you install an extra latch on plastic doors?

Goldielocks

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #19 on: October 22, 2018, 06:58:58 PM »
How would you install an extra latch on plastic doors?

I am assuming you don't mean an exterior door...? 
What sort of plastic door are you referring to?   furniture type ones can have a sticky back to the latch, if light duty   Most doors are plastic over wood or fibreglass, which you attach a latch per normal procedure.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2018, 01:05:44 AM »
I did mean exterior doors.

dashuk

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #21 on: October 23, 2018, 02:48:00 AM »
I did mean exterior doors.

We just lock them. Key is on a high hook nearby during the daytime, so not really an inconvenience.

My in-laws house very rapidly acquired bolts high up on the bathroom and toilet doors when it became apparent that tiny fingers could undo the locks built into the knobs from the outside :D.  Obviously as parent rather than grandparent you'll have already accepted you're not having a poo on your own for the next several years, so that doesn't matter.

As noted, we have extremely over-engineered mains sockets in the UK.

Hang TV on the wall (although ISTR you not having one?).

How effective kitchen cupboard locks are depends on the relative robustness of the door/hinges vs child. Our (90+ %ile height and weight) kids fairly quickly figured out that if they swung on it the door sagged enough that the catch missed the hook. We now have the knobs on the cupboard under the sink and the fridge (next to each other) tied together with an elastic hairband. Pretty sure #2 knows how to unhook it, but he seems to accept it, and the elastic generally shuts the fridge again, which is good.

Cranky

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #22 on: October 23, 2018, 03:54:46 AM »
Oh, if youíve got a tv not on the walk, strap it down so it canít be pulled over.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #23 on: October 23, 2018, 04:06:30 AM »
Hazards seem to be sorting themselves into the following categories:
Genuine risk of instant death (e.g. falling out of a window, being crushed by a full bookcase)
Potential A&E trip (e.g. burns from touching the oven door, eating pins)
Tears and tidying up (e.g. squeezing all of the shower gel into the bath, pulling the curtains down)

Obviously the first category must be dealt with as completely as possible. The second category must be dealt with or mitigated to the greatest extent possible. And if anything from the third category can easily be dealt with it will be but otherwise we will learn that actions have consequences.

The only genuinely precious things we own are some of my husband's books and we are going to lock him out of our study. Other than that of course it would be sad and annoying if he broke things but we would live. We don't have lots of ornaments and sentimental crap.

P.S. We have no TV. And no coffee table.

cerat0n1a

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #24 on: October 23, 2018, 04:29:09 AM »
Take a step back, breathe, and remember that most everything marketed for toddler safety today did not exist 30 years ago. And yet we all managed to get through our early years without killing ourselves.

True, but I have a nice scar on my face from when I was a toddler, my brother had his only ever trip to hospital, when he was one, from climbing up a sideboard and helping himself to mum's iron tablets, one of my sisters has a long scar on her leg from climbing up on a broken fence and falling onto a rusty nail. And I can think of a few scary near misses too. In the UK these days, if you turn up at hospital with an injured toddler too often, you will have a visit from social services...

Our kids were capable of working out window locks and cupboard locks before the age of 3  - I ended up using a screwdriver to screw some upstairs windows shut. That only works with wooden frames of course. At least no-one has to worry about video recorders being used as postboxes any more.

Seems to me like you've prioritised correctly SLTD and I think all the obvious things have been covered here. You also need to think about other people's houses, which were always more of a problem IME and also be prepared to fix things on the fly. Youngest son was obsessed with vacuum cleaners ("huba" was one of his first 10 words) and that was a bit of a safety issue until he grew out of it. Are "reins" still a thing for toddlers walking near busy roads?

I've seen hospital data which says that in some areas more than 50% of under-5s visit A&E in any one year. Clearly a lot of that is people worrying about meningitis or something rather than actual accidents, but still.

dashuk

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #25 on: October 23, 2018, 05:07:08 AM »
Are "reins" still a thing for toddlers walking near busy roads?

Yes. Although the set we have came from a charity shop and may well date back to my childhood. The ubiquitous Little Life animal rucksacks come with a 'lead' as well.

We didn't use them a lot - I've got mixed feelings about them - but there were a few instances where they were good for peace of mind, like when OH was walking #1 to pre-school a few weeks post-partum with #2 in the pushchair.

GuitarStv

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #26 on: October 23, 2018, 07:27:05 AM »
Most of what we did for child safety was just putting things up high and electrical plug socket covers.  I installed a few child locks on lower bathroom and kitchen cabinet doors, but ended up taking them off because they were a pain in the ass for the adults to use.  We have a smart beagle who is able to open most cabinet drawers by banging her head into them repeatedly and wiggling her snout, so we were kinda prepared for the toddler thing already I guess . . . most of the edible/poison stuff was already up high or carefully hidden away in tightly sealed containers.

We've got a lot of stairs in our house and did install some gates around them too.  Corners and edges on things though?  Meh.  Banging your head is part of being a child.

chaskavitch

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #27 on: October 23, 2018, 09:25:28 AM »
I did mean exterior doors.

We just lock them. Key is on a high hook nearby during the daytime, so not really an inconvenience.


Our exterior doors have a normal turn handle and a deadbolt with a turning mechanism, like the below picture, both of which our 2.5 year old can reach and undo.  We can't lock them with a key at all from the inside.  Thanks to this discussion, DH and I are considering getting high latches for when we're home, because occasionally the quiet times make me worry...

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #28 on: October 23, 2018, 09:53:45 AM »
We have gates on the staircases, all furniture bolted to the wall, an oven lock, and a few child locks on cabinets. But for the most part, we let her get into stuff.  We add child proofing as we see the need for it- the oven lock came after she opened the (cold) oven.  We moved a bathroom lock from downstairs (where she can't get to) to our pantry, so it locks now too.

All of our doors are levers, so she can get into them, so we use gates to keep her away from rooms, but she can get into most of them if she wants. We rearranged our bathroom drawers so she can get out her own toothbrush, and give us ours- but can't get any sort of medicine. We rearranged the kitchen so she can reach her plates, but not our breakable ones.

We haven't added anything to exterior doors, but will likely have to when she gets older and figures out bolt locks or sliding doors.  We do have to remember to lock the garage door now though, because she likes to let herself out to play with her toys. Which would be fine if they weren't next to killer saws.

Goldielocks

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #29 on: October 24, 2018, 12:35:18 AM »
I did mean exterior doors.
Can you link a photo from a door website (with details)?   Maybe your term "plastic" is different from mine.   Maybe you mean the exterior storm / screen door?  I have seen plastic screen doors, but not exterior ones.

Essentially, if they can put a hinge in it, you can screw or whatever you want in it, too.  ? Some doors are hollow, so you need to keep that in mind (with built up area for the hinges to screw into).

 I keep thinking you are talking about melamine surface over wood doors, which are pretty common, or fibreglass door, or something else.

Moonwaves

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #30 on: October 24, 2018, 01:06:21 AM »
I did mean exterior doors.
Can you link a photo from a door website (with details)?   Maybe your term "plastic" is different from mine.   Maybe you mean the exterior storm / screen door?  I have seen plastic screen doors, but not exterior ones.

Essentially, if they can put a hinge in it, you can screw or whatever you want in it, too.  ? Some doors are hollow, so you need to keep that in mind (with built up area for the hinges to screw into).

 I keep thinking you are talking about melamine surface over wood doors, which are pretty common, or fibreglass door, or something else.
I assumed she meant uPVC doors, which are fairly standard in newer houses in Ireland (and presumably UK, too). Like these: https://www.wickes.co.uk/Products/Doors+Windows/External-Doors/Front+Back-Doors/uPVC-Doors/c/1000651.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #31 on: October 24, 2018, 01:52:18 AM »
I did mean exterior doors.
Can you link a photo from a door website (with details)?   Maybe your term "plastic" is different from mine.   Maybe you mean the exterior storm / screen door?  I have seen plastic screen doors, but not exterior ones.

Essentially, if they can put a hinge in it, you can screw or whatever you want in it, too.  ? Some doors are hollow, so you need to keep that in mind (with built up area for the hinges to screw into).

 I keep thinking you are talking about melamine surface over wood doors, which are pretty common, or fibreglass door, or something else.
I assumed she meant uPVC doors, which are fairly standard in newer houses in Ireland (and presumably UK, too). Like these: https://www.wickes.co.uk/Products/Doors+Windows/External-Doors/Front+Back-Doors/uPVC-Doors/c/1000651.

Yes, those are the ones I mean. Ours is most like this one: https://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Carolina-Pre-hung-Upvc-Front-Door-Set-2085-x-920mm-Left-Hand-Hung/p/121569 They are a normal front door (I don't really know what a screen door or storm door is - I've sort of heard of them but never seen one) that's made of plastic.

Goldielocks

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #32 on: October 24, 2018, 04:16:18 PM »
Okay, thanks.  Try this video to get an idea...   There are also self drilling PVC screws so you don't have to pre drill the hole.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vxzuFCW4w6k

We have PVC frames on doors / windows here, and solid PVC screen doors (which are kind of flappy), and PVC film over wood doors (for surface coating) but not all 100% PVC for exterior doors.  (Cabinets, yes, but not entry doors).


dashuk

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #33 on: October 25, 2018, 02:18:41 AM »
I would wonder whether drilling holes in the frame of a uPVC door or window would compromise its thermal properties, because I think at least some brands gas-fill the frame as well as the glass unit.

Cranky

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #34 on: October 25, 2018, 05:23:01 AM »
I think the self stick cabinet latches will work. An adult who yanks on the door really hard could probably pull them off, but they will keep a toddler contained. Put them up high on the door.

Also, I had bells on my exterior doors when my kids were that age, so I could hear if anyone made a break for it.

It really is easier if you're in a small apartment because you are pretty aware of where they are. (And my kids tended to stick close.)

chemistk

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #35 on: October 26, 2018, 06:12:20 AM »
I think if we could do it again, we would only buy these things:

-Baby gates for all stairs that don't have a door.
-Cabinet latches and locks. (the magnetic kind, if you can)
-Door handle covers.
-(Not sure this is a thing in the UK) Safety outlets. We rent, so we can't do these upgrades (we asked), but one room has safety outlets where the plug will only work if both prongs go in at the same time.

It all depends on the kid. We put the corner guards on things, and then they fall and injure themselves on the wall (ugh lol). Then they ate the foam corner guards. They pulled the socket protectors out, they thwarted about half of the stuff we thought they wouldn't be able to get through.

Slow&Steady

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #36 on: October 26, 2018, 08:29:32 AM »
Maybe I am in the minority here but aside from removing the coffee table (simply to have more crawling/playing room), and organizing the cabinets so that kid stuff was easier to reach and dangerous stuff was more difficult to get to we did not do any child proofing with our 1st baby.  We have baby gates but those were purchased long before the baby came along and was more to keep the dogs and cat from killing each other, I do not think we have used it at all for the baby but we also live in a single level home.  However, we did spend time explaining stuff from a young age.  "Do not touch this, it is hot and will burn you.  Do not go outside without mommy or daddy.  These are sharp and can cut you."  I found that most of the stuff I bought were things to make her more independent, such as a good stool that she could move around the kitchen to help cook or get things off the counter, light switch extenders so that she could turn the light on and off by herself, a toilet seat that has the little seat builtin and a little step that she could move herself so that she could try to potty by herself. 

She is 4 now and has never stuck anything in an electrical outlet, only goes near the wood burning stove when it is not in use or we say she can help with something, can turn on all the necessary lights by herself, will go outside by herself after she asks us, and helps get/cook food all the time.  She probably wasn't able to open the doors knobs until 2.5 or 3 and both our exterior doors are surrounded by a fence or else that might have been something I worried more about. 

Anatidae V

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #37 on: October 26, 2018, 08:37:20 AM »
We put foam stripping over the nasty metal/tile step inside our house between our kitchen and loungeroom, and I've been enthusiastic with applying stick-on plastic latches for our kitchen cupboards, bathroom cupboards and the drawers in our study nook, plus dangerous goods (cleaning chemicals, medicines and supplements) placed high. We do need to get a fence for our yard, but our generally mild mannered toddler has been easy on us. I agree with making it hard for the kiddo to get out of the house, particularly onto the road. As difficult as you can possibly make it. Not every kid who makes a run for it, makes it back safely (though almost all do, and even more so now). I have one less family member due to this.

Abe

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #38 on: October 26, 2018, 10:24:28 PM »
We did a couple things that ended up being useful, and others that are (so far) unnecessary. Caveat being I took care of a lot of pediatric trauma so my experience is skewed significantly.

1. Covers on the electrical sockets (unless you live in Europe, apparently). Our son picked at them for a day and then gave up. I've never seen a major electrical burn from 110V, even in children, so it's probably low yield. However, covers are cheap. 220V can cause significant injuries and those outlets should be covered or deactivated if not used.

2. Straps for TVs, monitors, bookcases, stand-alone cabinets, and anything else heavy that can fall on the child. Lots of severe trauma from kids pulling TVs onto themselves. It is best to screw the straps into the wall studs (not sheetrock).

3. Hot water - turn your tap to max heat. If it hurts to keep your hand under it for more than a second or two, it can cause severe burns. Go to the water heater and turn it down until it's safe. Children burn easier than adults, especially on their face and palms.

4. Anything that gets hot and can burn should be kept well away from kids (tea kettles, room heaters, hot water on stove, deep fryers). Metal surfaces usually don't cause major burns because the kid will reflexively pull their hand away. More important is keeping them away from hot water or oil. They cause deep burns since it's harder for the kid to "escape" the heat source.

5. Any cleaning agents - keep them on high shelves rather than under the sink cabinets. Your child will figure out how to open those door locks eventually. Don't make it possible for them to try to drink the Draino.

6. Covers for knobs on the stove. Prevents your house from filling with combustible gas.

7. Locks for toilet seats. Toddlers can fall into toilets and drown. Also, never leave them unsupervised near any tub, bucket, etc filled with water.

8. Any power tool, or really any tool that has moving parts should be locked away. Finger amputations require very little force. Hand tools are less dangerous but can still hurt if used as a toy.   

9. Gates at top and bottom of stairs. Falls from couches, chairs, etc are unlikely to cause significant injury. Falls from stairs are much higher risk of neck or head injury. Also, don't leave ladders around. If for some reason you have a permanent ladder, remove the first few rungs so they can't climb up.

10. Play equipment outdoors should be properly secured to the ground. The most common serious injury are from these things are swings that are not secured and tip over.

The reality is a properly supervised toddler is unlikely to seriously injure themselves, but it's impractical to watch them every waking moment.

« Last Edit: October 26, 2018, 10:32:32 PM by Abe »

Cassie

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #39 on: October 26, 2018, 10:58:33 PM »
Most toddlers follow their parents around every second.  I always knew where my kids were all the time.   

Anatidae V

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #40 on: October 26, 2018, 11:51:23 PM »
@Abe good point about the water temperature. However, if you have a tank system it needs a certain temp to keep safe to drink. A plumber can install a device to keep water temp entering your house at 50įC, the recommended temperature according to the kidsafe groups here. Then your water is safe to use and won't cause burns (very quickly).

HappierAtHome

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #41 on: October 27, 2018, 02:46:38 AM »
The only thing I will say about babyproofing is that every kid is radically different. My 17 month old can open every door in the house, pushes chairs up to tables so he can climb up onto them, and certainly does not follow me around (I run after him!). You mostly just have to wait and see what kind of toddler yours is.

Independence: I make sure there are books where he can get them, so he can bring me a book whenever he wants me to read one. If I leave the baby carrier on the floor or table, he will bring it to me when he wants a walk through the neighbourhood. My toddler has never in his life asked for a nappy change, but Anatidae V has previously said hers brought her the change pad when he wanted a change. Any set up that enables your child to communicate what he needs or wants will make it easier for you.

Cranky

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #42 on: October 27, 2018, 05:03:23 AM »
My dh stuck a fork into electrical outlet as a small child, so the minute I announce I was pregnant he went out and bought socket plugs. ;-)

cerat0n1a

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #43 on: October 27, 2018, 06:30:15 AM »
My dh stuck a fork into electrical outlet as a small child, so the minute I announce I was pregnant he went out and bought socket plugs. ;-)

Fortunately in Britain, our sockets are already safe and using socket covers makes it less safe, not more. We have 3 prongs on the plug. Current will only flow if all 3 of the prongs are pushed in. The prong on the ground connection is longer than on the other two and acts as a mechanical switch. Furthermore, unlike the US, each prong is half covered in insulation. So the prongs have to be pushed all the way in for anything current to flow - so there's no possibility of problems due to touching something exposed. The prongs themselves are much longer and thicker than fork tines and the whole socket is much bigger.

If your child could get hold of three flat-bladed screwdrivers that didn't have insulated handles, maybe they could electrocute themselves, but even then, they'd trip the RCD first if they'd made a path to earth. If your toddler can get hold of some screwdrivers, there's probably other ways they could hurt themselves.

Cranky

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #44 on: October 27, 2018, 09:18:13 AM »
I have a friend whose 2yo used a screwdriver to take the crib apart.

Goldielocks

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #45 on: October 27, 2018, 03:22:08 PM »
I have a friend whose 2yo used a screwdriver to take the crib apart.
Hah!  My 16 mo daughter would fling herself over the crib rail, land with a thud, get up manage to open the bedroom door and walk out of her room, and start wandering -- at 4am.   


We had to put the mattress on the floor so she would not injure herself, but getting up so early to watch her was very hard.

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #46 on: October 27, 2018, 04:19:10 PM »
Could someone send me a news link to a toddler who fell into a toilet and drowned?

I think most parents are more worried about all the things they try to flush down them, or that they just like to play and splash in them.

Yes, you can drown in less than an inch. But as deep as my anxiety is, I've never heard of a toddler drowning in a toilet

Goldielocks

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #47 on: October 27, 2018, 04:46:48 PM »
It's pretty low compared to all drownings, I think.


Here is the only news story about a toddler toilet drowing that I found.
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2205259/Mendi-Altman-Familys-horror-toddler-drowns-face-aunts-toilet-visiting-Rosh-Hashanah.html

This is the only study reference I found, but not the actual study -- you may be able to find the original study by CPSC websearch...

http://www.helpkeepkidssafe.org/pt/pt_tips_wat

Quote
About one-third as many children (an average of about 115 annually) drown from other hazards around the home as do in pools. U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) has received reports of 459 young children who drowned in bathtubs, buckets, toilets, spas, hot tubs and other containers of water in a 4-year period between 1996 and 1999.
Ö
Children under age one most often drown in bathtubs, buckets, or toilets.

Toilets
Toilets can be overlooked as a drowning hazard in the home. The typical scenario involves a child under 3-years-old falling headfirst into the toilet. CPSC has received reports of 16* children under age 5 who drowned in toilets between 1996 and 1999.
** NOTE, murders are included in these numbers, and a high number of newborn murders are in a toilet, at the time of birth, so I can't tell what the number of accidental ones are out of the 16 reported**
Quote
...
Keep the toilet lid down to prevent access to the water and consider using a toilet clip to stop young children from opening the lids. Consider placing a latch on the bathroom door out of reach of young children.

And the report on child deaths:


In the Homes: 459 children died in the home from drowning in these 4 years, including:
Buckets: 58 children
Bathtubs: 306 Children (approx.)
Toilets: 16 children
Hot tap water scalds: 34 children died
Spa / hot tub:55

Plus
Swimming Pool:344 children
Natural environment / boating: not mentioned

I'm a red panda

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #48 on: October 27, 2018, 04:58:29 PM »
Thanks.  More worried about the dog bowls...but less so now that she is SO mobile.

Abe

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Re: Babyproofing for toddler independence later on
« Reply #49 on: October 28, 2018, 03:28:06 PM »
Could someone send me a news link to a toddler who fell into a toilet and drowned?

I think most parents are more worried about all the things they try to flush down them, or that they just like to play and splash in them.

Yes, you can drown in less than an inch. But as deep as my anxiety is, I've never heard of a toddler drowning in a toilet

I personally was involved in the resuscitation of one child. They didnít make it. Obviously itís anecdotal but children can fall in and not get out.