Author Topic: Any experiences with the Cash Flow for Kids board game by Robert Kiyosaki?  (Read 385 times)

jengod

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We love the “retro 1974 edition” of PAYDAY (sold at Target) and we have enjoyed the Allowance Game from Lakeshore. My 8yo enjoys Monopoly although I personally get overwhelmed by the full length of a game.

Wondering about other business or finance board games for kids. I see Cash Flow for Kids on Amazon but it’s pricey and although I’ve appreciated his books for what they are, I wouldn’t say he’s my primary source of advice on personal finance.

Have you played it? Recommend or discourage purchase?

mousebandit

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We have it, kids love it.  It really lays out the distinction between income and expenses, and assets and liabilities and gets kids thinking on that level.  Perfect introduction to financial independence.  It is stupid expensive, but it's nice, and we have 4 kids and will keep it forever.  We play it frequently.  It can take a while to get through a game, and it is luck-based, which can frustrate your brighter kids, since they have very little control over their finances.  But still, I think it's good.  Best bet would be to split the cost with some mustachian parent friends, and swap it back and forth. 

jengod

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Ugh just saw my phone triple posted. SORRY everybody.

Impressed to hear you guys dig it! I just bought a vintage game called Ratrace. Maybe Cashflow will be our next get. Thank you!

shelivesthedream

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I played Ratrace with my parents and brother. The gameplay is simple and kind of stupid but we got it as young teenagers and the retro chic and weird phrasing led to endless rounds of family in-jokes. Who is Pamela, and why am I buying her a mink coat? Won't she be upset if I also buy a sports car for Donna? Why do I have to pay you money just to be in your shop if I'm not buying anything? (There was a protection racket run by Boris and Mr Fist.) It turned into an opportunity for character creation and role play and laughing at the olden days stylin'. The game was a bit pants, but the fun was endless.

If you want an "educational" game, I recommend Articulate. It's like charades but with words and you have to really flex your mind and be on the ball with vocabulary. It's easy for a wide range of ages to play, although as children we had a free pass on any card we drew where we actually didn't know what it was (names of people and places, mostly).