Author Topic: Top is in  (Read 1367922 times)

EscapeVelocity2020

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5900 on: February 23, 2020, 07:30:38 PM »
Grrr...futures are showing Monday is coming in as a hard crash.   Oh well, who needed another $100,000 on those puts...would just have been more taxes.
Well, if SPY does fall below 325 before March 20th, you will have made it a lot more fun to watch!  Not entirely sure if you will be better off since you also comment on making money when this position loses money, but it has given me some interest to watch the market on Monday since you seem to think something big is about to happen.

Roland of Gilead

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5901 on: February 23, 2020, 07:33:38 PM »
Grrr...futures are showing Monday is coming in as a hard crash.   Oh well, who needed another $100,000 on those puts...would just have been more taxes.
Well, if SPY does fall below 325 before March 20th, you will have made it a lot more fun to watch!  Not entirely sure if you will be better off since you also comment on making money when this position loses money, but it has given me some interest to watch the market on Monday since you seem to think something big is about to happen.

It isn't as fun to watch when I have closed out the puts for a $3500 gain and yet still hold well over a million in a 401K that is mostly in the S&P500.

Monerexia

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5902 on: February 23, 2020, 09:37:39 PM »
Grrr...futures are showing Monday is coming in as a hard crash.   Oh well, who needed another $100,000 on those puts...would just have been more taxes.
Well, if SPY does fall below 325 before March 20th, you will have made it a lot more fun to watch!  Not entirely sure if you will be better off since you also comment on making money when this position loses money, but it has given me some interest to watch the market on Monday since you seem to think something big is about to happen.

It isn't as fun to watch when I have closed out the puts for a $3500 gain and yet still hold well over a million in a 401K that is mostly in the S&P500.

SELL SELL SELL!!!!!

aspiringnomad

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5903 on: February 23, 2020, 11:07:10 PM »
Read every page of this thread. Just print them out and leave them next to your toilet.

Fold it lengthwise after reading, and you have your supply of double-ply close at hand. ;)

Forever roll top is forever in.


Wow thatís a real thing.  Is it cheaper than regular rolls?

When you said forever roll I thought more like this:

Oh it's real. Charmin sells it for $30, oddly with the stand included. Not sure what that works out to on a per square basis, but when factoring divorce attorney costs, probably cheaper than buying this forever roll for your family:



vand

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5904 on: February 24, 2020, 05:01:40 AM »
Markets are very stretched and due a correction, maybe a significant one.
I've partially hedged my portfolio by shorting S&P and FTSE100 from this level. Laugh all you want.

For disclosure: 

I took advantage of the FTSE's dip below its 200dma to cover my short position for 190pts profit, and also to slug more money into my FTSE tracker.

Still holding S&P short position, currently 74pts in loss. Happy enough to let this run as its only a small percentage of my overall position.

Covered all short positions now. Didnt trally make much from S&P short but make some decent profit from FTSE shorts.

My 25% precious metal allocation is my only portfolio hedge right now. And what a great hesge it is proving.

frugalnacho

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5905 on: February 24, 2020, 07:02:12 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

Roland of Gilead

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5906 on: February 24, 2020, 07:04:41 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

I think he was saying that stonks only go up, so essentially he was the first member of https://www.reddit.com/r/wallstreetbets before there was even an internet

vand

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5907 on: February 24, 2020, 07:15:04 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

Quite easy.. the type of bubble sentiment which justifies the idea that any price is worth paying.

Brother Esau

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5908 on: February 24, 2020, 07:44:02 AM »
Uh oh...

frugalnacho

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5909 on: February 24, 2020, 08:00:33 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

I think he was saying that stonks only go up, so essentially he was the first member of https://www.reddit.com/r/wallstreetbets before there was even an internet

So did he not know what a plateau is, or do I?

Buffaloski Boris

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5910 on: February 24, 2020, 08:06:10 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

Quite easy.. the type of bubble sentiment which justifies the idea that any price is worth paying.

This is not a bubble.  The market is just pining for the fjords! 

frugalnacho

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5911 on: February 24, 2020, 08:14:59 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

Quite easy.. the type of bubble sentiment which justifies the idea that any price is worth paying.

Right, but still they cannot have reached a plateau and simultaneously go higher.  Regardless of your own personal beliefs, only one of those statements can possibly be true. 

frugalnacho

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5912 on: February 24, 2020, 08:16:07 AM »
Also the top is in.  Prices will plateau and remain stable.  They will also continue to increase.  But top is in, so expect a correction as well.

vand

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5913 on: February 24, 2020, 08:52:33 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

Quite easy.. the type of bubble sentiment which justifies the idea that any price is worth paying.

Right, but still they cannot have reached a plateau and simultaneously go higher.  Regardless of your own personal beliefs, only one of those statements can possibly be true.

Why are you getting worked up over the illogical reasoning put out at the top an asset bubble? This is exactly how asset bubbles are formed! Prices become detatched from reality and all sorts of contradictory nonsense is invented to justify it.

During the Nikkei bubble they believed that patriotism would mean nobody would be tempted to sell their shares so there would always be a shortage of supply to drive prices higher. During dotcom companies losing money per unit sold would claim they would make it up through selling more units. I'm not making this stuff up.. this is how silly and twisted logic becomes when everyone is caught up in a bubble.

wienerdog

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5914 on: February 24, 2020, 08:59:33 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

Quite easy.. the type of bubble sentiment which justifies the idea that any price is worth paying.

Right, but still they cannot have reached a plateau and simultaneously go higher.  Regardless of your own personal beliefs, only one of those statements can possibly be true.

Why are you getting worked up over the illogical reasoning put out at the top an asset bubble? This is exactly how asset bubbles are formed! Prices become detatched from reality and all sorts of contradictory nonsense is invented to justify it.

During the Nikkei bubble they believed that patriotism would mean nobody would be tempted to sell their shares so there would always be a shortage of supply to drive prices higher. During dotcom companies losing money per unit sold would claim they would make it up through selling more units. I'm not making this stuff up.. this is how silly and twisted logic becomes when everyone is caught up in a bubble.

So you are saying fear is back?

Buffaloski Boris

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5915 on: February 24, 2020, 08:59:58 AM »
Also the top is in.  Prices will plateau and remain stable.  They will also continue to increase.  But top is in, so expect a correction as well.

So the outlook for stocks is that prices will go up, prices will go down, and prices will be stable? 

That's why I'm here: actionable advice.

(Thanks for the chuckle).   

Buffaloski Boris

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5916 on: February 24, 2020, 09:05:10 AM »

Davnasty

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5917 on: February 24, 2020, 09:36:13 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

Quite easy.. the type of bubble sentiment which justifies the idea that any price is worth paying.

Right, but still they cannot have reached a plateau and simultaneously go higher.  Regardless of your own personal beliefs, only one of those statements can possibly be true.

Why are you getting worked up over the illogical reasoning put out at the top an asset bubble? This is exactly how asset bubbles are formed! Prices become detatched from reality and all sorts of contradictory nonsense is invented to justify it.

During the Nikkei bubble they believed that patriotism would mean nobody would be tempted to sell their shares so there would always be a shortage of supply to drive prices higher. During dotcom companies losing money per unit sold would claim they would make it up through selling more units. I'm not making this stuff up.. this is how silly and twisted logic becomes when everyone is caught up in a bubble.

You're missing the point. The only thing frugalnacho was questioning was the wording and no one is "worked up".

"reached what looks like a permanently high plateau." sounds a lot like saying the top is in/the market will go forever sideways. Obviously that's not what Fisher meant if he also said "prices [] should go much higher".

Perhaps Fisher meant that prices had reached a plateau and would never dip below it? In any case I agree that the word choice was confusing.

frugalnacho

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5918 on: February 24, 2020, 09:52:42 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

Quite easy.. the type of bubble sentiment which justifies the idea that any price is worth paying.

Right, but still they cannot have reached a plateau and simultaneously go higher.  Regardless of your own personal beliefs, only one of those statements can possibly be true.

Why are you getting worked up over the illogical reasoning put out at the top an asset bubble? This is exactly how asset bubbles are formed! Prices become detatched from reality and all sorts of contradictory nonsense is invented to justify it.

During the Nikkei bubble they believed that patriotism would mean nobody would be tempted to sell their shares so there would always be a shortage of supply to drive prices higher. During dotcom companies losing money per unit sold would claim they would make it up through selling more units. I'm not making this stuff up.. this is how silly and twisted logic becomes when everyone is caught up in a bubble.

I'm not worked up, and I'm not concerned over illogical reasoning.  The statement posted is self contradictory though, that's where I'm confused.  I'm fine with irrational exuberance, and illogical reasoning, but it has to be self consistent at least.   The people claiming that patriotism will drive prices higher were not simultaneously saying the prices will drop or stay flat, because no matter how ill informed and flawed your logic is to reach your conclusion, that conclusion is self contradictory. 

You claim prices will go up, you may be right or you may be wrong.
You claim prices will go down, you may be right or you may be wrong.
You claim prices will both go up and down simultaneously, you are definitely wrong.  Similarly to claim prices have reached a "permanent plateau" but also "will go much higher" and you are definitely wrong because it makes no sense.  Are you familiar with the old robot saying, "Does not compute"?

frugalnacho

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5919 on: February 24, 2020, 09:56:29 AM »
There was another thread, awhile back (like 1929 I think) where poster Irving Fisher said the market had reached a permanently high plateau.

"The stock market crash of 1929 and the subsequent Great Depression cost Fisher much of his personal wealth and academic reputation. He famously predicted, nine days before the crash, that stock prices had "reached what looks like a permanently high plateau."[26] Irving Fisher stated on October 21 that the market was "only shaking out of the lunatic fringe" and went on to explain why he felt the prices still had not caught up with their real value and should go much higher. On Wednesday, October 23, he announced in a banker's meeting "security values in most instances were not inflated." For months after the Crash, he continued to assure investors that a recovery was just around the corner. "

How could stocks have "reached a permanently high plateau", but also "not have caught up with their real value and should go much higher"? Is my reading comprehension top in, or are those statements completely contradictory?

Quite easy.. the type of bubble sentiment which justifies the idea that any price is worth paying.

Right, but still they cannot have reached a plateau and simultaneously go higher.  Regardless of your own personal beliefs, only one of those statements can possibly be true.

Why are you getting worked up over the illogical reasoning put out at the top an asset bubble? This is exactly how asset bubbles are formed! Prices become detatched from reality and all sorts of contradictory nonsense is invented to justify it.

During the Nikkei bubble they believed that patriotism would mean nobody would be tempted to sell their shares so there would always be a shortage of supply to drive prices higher. During dotcom companies losing money per unit sold would claim they would make it up through selling more units. I'm not making this stuff up.. this is how silly and twisted logic becomes when everyone is caught up in a bubble.

You're missing the point. The only thing frugalnacho was questioning was the wording and no one is "worked up".

"reached what looks like a permanently high plateau." sounds a lot like saying the top is in/the market will go forever sideways. Obviously that's not what Fisher meant if he also said "prices [] should go much higher".

Perhaps Fisher meant that prices had reached a plateau and would never dip below it? In any case I agree that the word choice was confusing.

Exactly, I'm not fucking worked up god dammit!


SwordGuy

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5920 on: February 24, 2020, 11:01:22 AM »
With all the activity on this thread I figured something must be going on in the market.

And, basically, at the moment, my stocks are still higher than they were at the start of the year.

Time to press the snooze button again. 

Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5921 on: February 24, 2020, 11:05:20 AM »
With all the activity on this thread I figured something must be going on in the market.

And, basically, at the moment, my stocks are still higher than they were at the start of the year.

Time to press the snooze button again.

Are you kidding me?!? The Dow is down like 1000 points which is like 20% of 5000, which would be like 18% of the total Dow! The top was so in yesterday!

dougules

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5922 on: February 24, 2020, 11:12:57 AM »
Right, but still they cannot have reached a plateau and simultaneously go higher.  Regardless of your own personal beliefs, only one of those statements can possibly be true.

Why are you getting worked up over the illogical reasoning put out at the top an asset bubble? This is exactly how asset bubbles are formed! Prices become detatched from reality and all sorts of contradictory nonsense is invented to justify it.

During the Nikkei bubble they believed that patriotism would mean nobody would be tempted to sell their shares so there would always be a shortage of supply to drive prices higher. During dotcom companies losing money per unit sold would claim they would make it up through selling more units. I'm not making this stuff up.. this is how silly and twisted logic becomes when everyone is caught up in a bubble.

Yes, that's exactly what we're all saying!  The top is in!  The bubble is about to burst, and we're all doomed!

Turkey Leg

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5923 on: February 24, 2020, 11:14:12 AM »
Sell all stocks and buy gold because...



...gold top is in!

techwiz

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5924 on: February 24, 2020, 11:43:44 AM »


Market bubble "POP"

Top is in!

BDWW

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5925 on: February 24, 2020, 12:16:24 PM »
I do get a bit irrationally sad on days like today...

Because I invest on a regular schedule, and don't have very much excess cash to buy shares on the dip. Oh well, maybe it be down more when next week's transfer hits.

wienerdog

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5926 on: February 24, 2020, 12:18:08 PM »
Why didn't Thorstach call the top on Thursday so I had warning of this?

SwordGuy

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5927 on: February 24, 2020, 12:21:34 PM »
S&P 500 was up 0.05% YTD when I checked.

Now it's down 0.13% YTD.   

I don't pay much attention to the Dow because I invest in broad-brush index funds.

dandarc

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5928 on: February 24, 2020, 12:23:01 PM »
Pricing in Bernie's win in Nevada?

SwordGuy

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5929 on: February 24, 2020, 12:34:45 PM »
With all the activity on this thread I figured something must be going on in the market.

And, basically, at the moment, my stocks are still higher than they were at the start of the year.

Time to press the snooze button again.

Are you kidding me?!? The Dow is down like 1000 points which is like 20% of 5000, which would be like 18% of the total Dow! The top was so in yesterday!

Are you kidding me?   As of this moment the Dow is down about 918 points, or 1.63% for the year.   Yawn.

Wake me at 10% down for the year.

habaneroNorway

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5930 on: February 24, 2020, 01:01:02 PM »
The Dow is a bizarre index, the weightings in the index are a result of share price of the components, not market cap as for the S&P 500. So the company with the highest weighting in the Dow is Boeing as the share price is 300 something (Apple is now #2). And some of the most valuable companies in the US ain't even in the index, like Amazon, for example. Goldman Sachs has almost twice the weight of JP Morgan despite the latter being way more valuable as a company. Home Depot has a higher weighting than Microsoft. And so on and so on.

DadJokes

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5931 on: February 24, 2020, 01:20:48 PM »
I wonder when Thorstach will make an appearance, leading to a nice rebound. Hopefully, it's after my next paycheck posts.

dandarc

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5932 on: February 24, 2020, 01:22:48 PM »
I wonder when Thorstach will make an appearance, leading to a nice rebound. Hopefully, it's after my next paycheck posts.
I'm guessing when fear is back.

dragoncar

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5933 on: February 24, 2020, 01:53:35 PM »
Itís not really contradictory.  I see plateau defined as ď a state of little or no change following a period of activity or progressĒ which does not preclude a little increase. 

Alternatively, heís speaking  geologically and a plateaus remain flat while plate tectonics continues to lift the entire plateau

Buffaloski Boris

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5934 on: February 24, 2020, 02:27:57 PM »

Are you kidding me?   As of this moment the Dow is down about 918 points, or 1.63% for the year.   Yawn.

Wake me at 10% down for the year.

Do a favor? Kick me awake when it goes to -15%.

aboatguy

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5935 on: February 24, 2020, 04:01:43 PM »
It went down, it is still dropping.......


To paraphrase Herman Wouk, Panic!, in times of danger or in doubt run in circles scream and shout....... or channel Jack Bogle and just do nothing...   I  prefer the later..and the top is still not in.

and it's still dropping
and its still dropping.....

Brother Esau

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5936 on: February 24, 2020, 04:36:23 PM »

Are you kidding me?   As of this moment the Dow is down about 918 points, or 1.63% for the year.   Yawn.

Wake me at 10% down for the year.

Do a favor? Kick me awake when it goes to -15%.

meh...i'll start paying attention after -20%

aspiringnomad

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5937 on: February 24, 2020, 04:54:33 PM »
Fear is back, VIX above 15, XIV breaking down. SPY to follow, a new coronavirus, aka COVID-19, will be a reality check.

All hail thorstach, the new prognosticator of prognosticators!



Glenstache

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5938 on: February 24, 2020, 05:18:37 PM »
Itís not really contradictory.  I see plateau defined as ď a state of little or no change following a period of activity or progressĒ which does not preclude a little increase. 

Alternatively, heís speaking  geologically and a plateaus remain flat while plate tectonics continues to lift the entire plateau
Geologically, plateaus are often all that us left after everything else has been eroded away.

dragoncar

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5939 on: February 24, 2020, 05:50:46 PM »

Are you kidding me?   As of this moment the Dow is down about 918 points, or 1.63% for the year.   Yawn.

Wake me at 10% down for the year.

Do a favor? Kick me awake when it goes to -15%.


Exflyboy

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5940 on: February 24, 2020, 06:06:50 PM »
I plan to move some of my Bond funds to stock at -20%.. I was just about to pull the trigger on Dec 24th 2018.. and the bastard market went up.. grr!

So yeah, 20% down is my first move..:)

Buffaloski Boris

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5941 on: February 24, 2020, 06:27:30 PM »
I plan to move some of my Bond funds to stock at -20%.. I was just about to pull the trigger on Dec 24th 2018.. and the bastard market went up.. grr!

So yeah, 20% down is my first move..:)

Yeah, I missed it last time.  Hence my humble request for an early wake-up call at -15%.  Until then it's just background noise.

Brother Esau

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5942 on: February 24, 2020, 06:54:10 PM »
I plan to move some of my Bond funds to stock at -20%.. I was just about to pull the trigger on Dec 24th 2018.. and the bastard market went up.. grr!

So yeah, 20% down is my first move..:)

I have green soldiers lined up and ready for the attack.

Heliios

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5943 on: February 24, 2020, 06:56:54 PM »
 Today

TomTX

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5944 on: February 24, 2020, 07:10:00 PM »

I have green soldiers lined up and ready for the attack.

I've got very little other than the usual beginning of the month payroll deduction investments...

JAYSLOL

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5945 on: February 24, 2020, 07:13:56 PM »
I wonder when Thorstach will make an appearance, leading to a nice rebound. Hopefully, it's after my next paycheck posts.

Tomorrow, if tomorrow is another day of sliding stock prices, followed by a rally Wednesday. 

Brother Esau

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5946 on: February 24, 2020, 07:15:32 PM »

I have green soldiers lined up and ready for the attack.

I've got very little other than the usual beginning of the month payroll deduction investments...

Just rebalancing in my case

Wintergreen78

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5947 on: February 24, 2020, 08:01:05 PM »
We havenít had a drop this big in the SP500 since 2018!!!

This is a disaster!!!!

PANIC!!!!!

Two whole years people. This is historic. Youíll be telling your grandkids where you were on February 24, 2020.

Iím selling everything and buying land in Arizona.

Glenstache

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5948 on: February 24, 2020, 09:51:14 PM »
We havenít had a drop this big in the SP500 since 2018!!!

This is a disaster!!!!

PANIC!!!!!

Two whole years people. This is historic. Youíll be telling your grandkids where you were on February 24, 2020.

Iím selling everything and buying land in Arizona.
Watch out for the Arizona property top.

Monerexia

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Re: Top is in
« Reply #5949 on: February 24, 2020, 09:57:09 PM »
How bleak it must be for the Only Up Is Good crowd. Missing the whole other half of life haha