Author Topic: Canadians Investing in Vanguard  (Read 285 times)

Rachel.T

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Canadians Investing in Vanguard
« on: August 07, 2018, 08:36:08 PM »
Hello, this is my first post on MMM. Iíve been reading a lot about index funds and investing using Vanguard. Iíve been reading some books on index investing (The Simple Path to Wealth, The Little Book of Common Sense Investing), but these books pertain mostly to Americans. Since I live in Canada, how do I go about investing in index funds, and as a Canadian, would I be able to invest through Vanguard? In addition, are there any book recommendations that provide information about investing in index funds as a Canadian?

snacky

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Re: Canadians Investing in Vanguard
« Reply #1 on: August 07, 2018, 09:06:17 PM »
You can't have an investment account with Vanguard directly, but any of the online brokerages will have vanguard products. I use Qtrade, for example. Here's an overview of the options: https://www.moneysense.ca/save/investing/canadas-best-online-brokers-2018/
(note: I didn't read the article, I just did a quick google)

https://canadiancouchpotato.com/ is a fantastic resource for ETF investing for Canadians.

Good luck!

Retire-Canada

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Re: Canadians Investing in Vanguard
« Reply #2 on: August 08, 2018, 06:57:46 AM »
I built myself a Vanguard portfolio based loosely on the CCP model portfolios of the day and opened RRSP/TFSA/Non-Reg accounts with Questrade. No problem buying Vanguard ETFs [free buys] at QT.

nihilism122

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Re: Canadians Investing in Vanguard
« Reply #3 on: August 08, 2018, 03:54:08 PM »
Just use VGRO if you are starting out.  That's all you need. 

K-ice

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Re: Canadians Investing in Vanguard
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2018, 08:32:19 PM »
I am roughly following couch potato (from a few year or so ago) with VAB, VXC, & VCN.

But Iím going to get my SO started on VBAL &/or VGRO soon.

I donít think VCNS would be enough to keep a mustacian going but I might recommend it to my conservative retired parents who are currently paying way to much 2% to a CIBC ďadvisorĒ for a 70:30 bond:equities mutual fund mix.


Freedomin5

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Re: Canadians Investing in Vanguard
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2018, 11:24:30 PM »
I second the recommendation to look through the Canadian Couch Potato site. As others have mentioned, you canít buy from Vanguard directly, but you can buy Vanguard funds through several online brokerages. I use TD WebBroker (I find it easier to keep all my banking/investing in one place ó transferring funds from my TD bank account to WebBroker can be done in one banking interface). You will have to check each online brokerage though, because I think some of them waive fees on certain ETF purchases. Also keep in mind that there are also other ETF providers such as iShares that offer competitive similar products.

K-ice

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Re: Canadians Investing in Vanguard
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2018, 11:44:59 PM »
I'll add that I just use RBC direct investing, and I am very happy with them.  It is $10 a trade and the annual fee is waved if you have $15,000 combined in all accounts.  I barely make 6 trades a year so trade fees are no big deal.  They are also now applying DRIP on Vanguard shares which they didn't do in the past.  (Drip is an automatic reinvestment at no fee.)

We just realized my SO is being charged fees for $3000 in shares in his CIBC direct investing account.  They are charging $105 per year! You need over $25,000 in your RRSP account to waive the fees at CIBC. 

So we are about to move that account "in-kind" to RBC. 

Shop around and confirm the annual fee, fee per trade and min amount to have annual fee waved.

From what I've heard QTrade, TD & RBC are good.  I'm running from CIBC.