Author Topic: Australian Investing Thread  (Read 1883381 times)

TassieFI

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4850 on: March 16, 2020, 03:14:22 AM »
Rather sobering fact talked about on ABCís 7:30 tonight in that there are only 2000 ICU beds in all of Australia.  As a healthcare worker I can only hope more extreme and stringent social distancing/containment issues are mandated and implemented by government sooner rather than later. 

marty998

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4851 on: March 16, 2020, 04:53:48 AM »
Market down 10% today, with a chunk of that in the after market auction at 4:10pm, so there's a disconnect between the VAS ETF price movement for the day and the market of about 2.5%. Wonder how they will true that up.... guess we'll find out tomorrow.

Rather sobering fact talked about on ABCís 7:30 tonight in that there are only 2000 ICU beds in all of Australia.  As a healthcare worker I can only hope more extreme and stringent social distancing/containment issues are mandated and implemented by government sooner rather than later. 

They're already rationing ICU beds in Italy - people over 60 are being turned away.

You can expect the same thing to happen here, there's a rush on ordering of ventilators but even still, there won't be enough if there is a spike in infections.

TassieFI

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4852 on: March 16, 2020, 05:32:05 AM »
I totally hear you Marty as just out of personal interest Iíve been following this pretty close for weeks now and reading different studies (yes Iíve got rather weird interests....lol) on all different aspects of this pandemic.  Itís heartbreaking whatís happening in different countries as they attempt to deal with this.  I think though to have it very publicly on record the actual number of icu beds in Australia should be a pretty sobering stat for all Australians and the government how terribly serious this is and it really is at crisis point (especially with flu season about to hit). 

Economically itíll be pretty interesting to see how this all shakes out and where things do end up bottoming out on the Australian and international markets.  Glad we are one of the very fortunate ones who are able to slowly drip feed in as the markets tank and eventually recover :-) Sadly for a lot in the community, economically this is going to be a disaster and I do feel for them :-(

marty998

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4853 on: March 16, 2020, 02:21:11 PM »
I totally hear you Marty as just out of personal interest Iíve been following this pretty close for weeks now and reading different studies (yes Iíve got rather weird interests....lol) on all different aspects of this pandemic.  Itís heartbreaking whatís happening in different countries as they attempt to deal with this.  I think though to have it very publicly on record the actual number of icu beds in Australia should be a pretty sobering stat for all Australians and the government how terribly serious this is and it really is at crisis point (especially with flu season about to hit). 

Economically itíll be pretty interesting to see how this all shakes out and where things do end up bottoming out on the Australian and international markets.  Glad we are one of the very fortunate ones who are able to slowly drip feed in as the markets tank and eventually recover :-) Sadly for a lot in the community, economically this is going to be a disaster and I do feel for them :-(

Yep - I hate seeing people cheer at a market drop. The wholesale destruction of wealth and hard earned savings of millions of hard working people is nothing to cheer about.

All things considered, more of the $17 billion stimulus should have been spent on the Health System. Wanna stimulate the economy? Hire more doctors and nurses and invest in hospital equipment.

This is a health crises first and an economic one second. They're trying to fix the latter (effect) before treating the former (cause).

chevy1956

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4854 on: March 16, 2020, 04:19:27 PM »
This is a health crises first and an economic one second. They're trying to fix the latter (effect) before treating the former (cause).

I care about the economic impact but to me it's way overdone. We should be able to accept lower growth for 6 months to a year. It shouldn't be catastrophic. The health crisis though is really important. Let's work through that and the economy will come back.

Dropbear

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4855 on: March 16, 2020, 08:18:24 PM »
UBS Australian ETFs to be Terminated

https://www.ubs.com/au/en/asset-management/funds-and-prices/exchange-traded-funds.html

UBS announced on Friday 13 March that MONY, DIV, ETF, UBE, UBJ, and UBU index funds will be terminated from the ASX on Monday 11 May.

---

Can I please ask you all for your review of how this affects me?

When I first started ETF investing a couple of years ago, I bought some UBU along with several other ETFs as part of my broad initial strategy.  Since then, my strategy has been simplified to focus more on VAS and VGS (which were also there from the beginning), but to date I still hold UBU.

Currently I'm coasting in a semi-FIRE state, about 60% to being FIRE - I've been pursing a research project and have a reduced income to report this financial year.  I have an emergency fund for 2+ years of living.  However, the project is now on hold due to the virus disruptions, so it might be good if I can return to work.

When the markets started dropping due to Covid-19, I thought I would hold all my ETFs as I planned.

However, it appears that I am now being forced out of UBU.  The timing is terrible - currently showing the lowest price it has been in quite some time.  However, as of now, I'm still 25% up over the 4 or so years that I've been holding it.

Can I please ask:

1 - What are my options?  Am I correct in thinking that I will have to leave UBU (whether I sell out at some point or wait for termination in May) and realise whatever profit or loss has accrued at that point?  Are there no other options for remaining invested in the US market and continuing to ride out the storm?

2 - What are your bets for timing - selling now verses selling later or terminating?  (Sorry, we're not usually the types to be discussing market timing like this!)  Or does timing matter at all, because if I sell UBU and buy an equivalent holding at current prices, have I effectively remained invested through the crash, so as to sufficiently benefit from any future recovery?

3 - Is this issue just one of the risks associated with investing, or are there any other lessons for me or others to be learnt here please?

Thanks!

mjr

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4856 on: March 16, 2020, 11:45:16 PM »
1 - Yep, you have to bail.  You get to choose when you liquidate, from now until May.

2 - I think it's still going to fall, but that's clearly market timing so what the hell do I know ?  Given that you don't have a choice, best bet is to reinvest as quickly as possible - hopefully not going to make a lot of difference whether you liquidate now or in 2 months.

3 - It's a risk investing with managed funds/etfs for sure.  Only way to minimise the risk is go wth the big funds with the big players

marty998

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4857 on: March 17, 2020, 04:28:46 AM »
If you don't bail, you will receive your proceeds from UBS a little later than 14 May.

However, UBS has to liquidate the entire fund. It may not be possible for them to do this if some stocks (especially those at the very bottom of the index) are illiquid, or they judge it to not be in the best interests of unit holders to sell immediately and crash the share price of those stocks at the bottom.

Waiting till the very end also means you will pick up a share of the final tax components of the fund upon liquidation, including capital gains and (most likely) losses. You might choose to crystallise your losses now (and use them in this tax year) by selling out on market, rather than wait till the wind up of the fund which could spill over into 2021 tax year.

I'd get out now, reinvest whatever proceeds you have in your other assets in your allocation (VAS and VGS)

Abundant life

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4858 on: March 17, 2020, 12:22:32 PM »
Is anyone else having trouble logging into their share trading account?

I've been with St George's direct shares for a few years now and hold a modest portfolio of an LIC and TLS. I login regularly to check on them (so I haven't forgotten my password!)

I'd like to at least see how they are going and invest in ETF's while the market is down. However last week when I couldn't log in I was able to phone them and they explained they were having 'technical problems'.

Since then I still can't log in and now the website says they're experiencing high call volumes. I tried to call at various times of the day, the last time waiting on the line for over 15 minutes, then gave up. I sent them an email but have heard nothing back. Am I the only one this is happening to?

deborah

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4859 on: March 17, 2020, 12:53:46 PM »
I would expect this to be happening. Everyone is panicking. Theyíre probably all selling. Youíll have to be prepared to stay on the phone for an hour if you want to get through, and choose your time well.

Trevor Reznik

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4860 on: March 17, 2020, 02:23:02 PM »
Commsec has been fairly good and the few times the website wasn't working I could login via the phone app.

TassieFI

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4861 on: March 17, 2020, 06:52:15 PM »
I'm with CMC and haven't had any issues and I've been checking in daily :-)

Dropbear

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4862 on: March 17, 2020, 08:18:58 PM »
1 - Yep, you have to bail.

Thanks mjr

chevy1956

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4863 on: March 17, 2020, 08:48:33 PM »
CommSec is working for me. I just bought a bunch of VAS. I intend to buy a couple more times over the next 6 or so months.

bigchrisb

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4864 on: March 18, 2020, 07:08:11 AM »
Nabtrade has been patchy on the high volume days.  I've been able do most of what I wanted eventually.  I'm accumulating, about 250k committed thus far and have about the same available. Wife and I also keeping 2 years expenses in cash accounts in case offsets freeze up.

marty998

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4865 on: March 19, 2020, 06:20:40 AM »
And the level of fucked just went up a notch today. ZIRP just hit Australian shores and the QE taps have been turned on.

The RBA basically just printed $90 billion to hand to the banks and say "here, throw it at the economy". Anecdotally I am already hearing of job losses and wage cuts. Interest rates at zero aren't going to help if you have no income :(

The cap raisings have started. Webjet in a trading halt (definitely a raising), and Flight Centre also in a TH (no details as yet).

I didn't think it would be so soon but here we are.

One saving grace is that the environment is loving it. Clear blue skies and clean air to breathe :)

Bloop Bloop

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4866 on: March 19, 2020, 04:38:56 PM »
How the heck are we ever going to pay back the deficit.

Ozlady

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4867 on: March 19, 2020, 04:52:58 PM »
Special tax levy on the rich? and employed ? :)

middo

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4868 on: March 19, 2020, 05:28:49 PM »
It is always possible that the "surplus fetish" the Coalition has had since 2008 may finally be broken, and reasonable budgetary measures may be needed for a while yet. 

We were probably heading for a recession anyway, and this has just brought it on much sooner.  But growth was always going to be an issue when the Government was proudly proclaiming their financial genius of removing around $50,000,000,000 per year from the economy to reduce the deficit.  That's $2000 per person in Australia, which is about how much consumer spending was contracting by.

In the 1970's, no one thought it unreasonable to have higher taxes than we do now, and our services were less.  Maybe we need a rethink of our priorities as a society.

Little Aussie Battler

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4869 on: March 19, 2020, 06:34:16 PM »
How the heck are we ever going to pay back the deficit.
I assume a 2-5% budget repair levy that will last for years.

The quicker we limit the spread and impact of this virus, and stop the panic (or, at least, change the media narrative), the faster the real economy and market will recover.

I'm not sure that there is a better answer at this point.

chevy1956

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4870 on: March 20, 2020, 07:39:54 PM »
How the heck are we ever going to pay back the deficit.
I assume a 2-5% budget repair levy that will last for years.

The quicker we limit the spread and impact of this virus, and stop the panic (or, at least, change the media narrative), the faster the real economy and market will recover.

I agree. I think this virus is a real problem but the economic impacts could be much worse.

marty998

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4871 on: March 22, 2020, 05:48:09 AM »
How the heck are we ever going to pay back the deficit.
I assume a 2-5% budget repair levy that will last for years.

The quicker we limit the spread and impact of this virus, and stop the panic (or, at least, change the media narrative), the faster the real economy and market will recover.

I agree. I think this virus is a real problem but the economic impacts could be much worse.

I think you're fucked Bloop. Time to leave the country.

Oh wait ;)

Bloop Bloop

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4872 on: March 22, 2020, 08:34:51 AM »
I think there's no doubt that my financial trajectory has just been lopped by a fairly large margin. I'll suffer a modest dip in income due to some of the economic turmoil and then I'll forego the juicy tax cuts that were meant to roll out (since they're undoubtedly off the table) and I'm planning for a significant tax rise or a permanent deficit levy. A triple whammy. At least I have my health, and that's the more important thing. When the country / world is in significant turmoil your thoughts can only turn to taking life one day at a time and being grateful for what you do have, and trying to make others' situation better.

marty998

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4873 on: March 22, 2020, 05:59:24 PM »
I think there's no doubt that my financial trajectory has just been lopped by a fairly large margin. I'll suffer a modest dip in income due to some of the economic turmoil and then I'll forego the juicy tax cuts that were meant to roll out (since they're undoubtedly off the table) and I'm planning for a significant tax rise or a permanent deficit levy. A triple whammy. At least I have my health, and that's the more important thing. When the country / world is in significant turmoil your thoughts can only turn to taking life one day at a time and being grateful for what you do have, and trying to make others' situation better.

Thatís a healthy attitude (no pun intended).

Whilst Iíve escaped the fall in equities for the most part, I still have my job and income.

However Iím expecting a hit to the property market soon. Thatíll bite, but long term things will recover eventually.

chevy1956

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4874 on: March 23, 2020, 04:59:15 AM »
I'm down a tonne of money but I'm not that worried. I own my house. If I keep my job I'll just keep investing in Shares for another couple of years. If I lose my job I'll survive for 5 odd years, sell the house and move elsewhere.

Dropbear

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4875 on: March 24, 2020, 05:37:25 AM »
What does everyone reckon about the option the federal government has announced for financially stressed people to withdraw $10-20k from their super?

Obviously for everyday types (either low income or just living-week-to-week) it's a terrible option to cash out their super after the market has slumped, and also to forgo the compounding effect that would otherwise happen with it.  So it will probably hit youth, women, and the disadvantaged the hardest.

But what about for the mustachian?  What if they take $10-20k out of their super (let's assume they've chosen the index option inside super) and re-invest it in the index outside super?  Pay more income tax on it while you're still in the working phase, sure, but now that money is unlocked and ready for FIRE...

For me, I'm thinking it would probably be better to leave it in super, because if I'm fortunate enough to live to retirement age then it'll probably be marginally more value by then.  But given the American mustachians have all sorts of paths for shifting their retirement accounts around, I wonder if anyone is thinking of taking the opportunity to do the same thing here?

Dropbear

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4876 on: March 24, 2020, 05:47:26 AM »
As for the question of whether the super system can help with current economic circumstances, there was a really interesting article in The Conversation suggesting the government could allow people to take a zero interest loan against their super.  The idea is that the cash comes in from the Reserve Bank, the super stays invested as security, and the loan can be sorted out in time...

If the government is reluctant to give people that much money directly, then I like this zero interest loan concept much better than the government's own super cash-out option!

How super could soften the financial blow of coronavirus
https://theconversation.com/how-super-could-soften-the-financial-blow-of-coronavirus-134134

There was also a great comment:
Would we be able to take out these interest free loans on our super to invest in our super?

Alchemisst

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4877 on: March 24, 2020, 08:20:07 PM »
I have some Vanguard Total U.S stock market (VTS), Vanguard world ex U.S (VEU) and total world hedged to Australian currency (VGAD).

As the USD has increased to the AUD the Unhedged etf's have not fallen as much as much as VGAD, I am considering selling some and buying the hedged VGAD as the AUD is currently less than 60 cents and I don't see it staying this low long term.

Is this a good idea or am I just making a prediction?

bigchrisb

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4878 on: March 25, 2020, 01:48:59 AM »
I have some Vanguard Total U.S stock market (VTS), Vanguard world ex U.S (VEU) and total world hedged to Australian currency (VGAD).

As the USD has increased to the AUD the Unhedged etf's have not fallen as much as much as VGAD, I am considering selling some and buying the hedged VGAD as the AUD is currently less than 60 cents and I don't see it staying this low long term.

Is this a good idea or am I just making a prediction?

You are making a prediction.  However, I'm also making the same prediction on forex, and have switched to buying VGAD instead of VGS, and have been sending Ä earned over the last 9 months into $AUD.  Currency markets were really dislocated a week or so ago - I managed to send some Ä home at 51.5 - its since bounced back to about 55.  Given that both Europe and the US are major infection centres, and also some of the most integrated economies, I see no rational reason for these currencies to be stronger.

Long term I prefer to hold unhedged international shares, both for diversification and due to the higher turnover/tax issues of hedged.  Hence I will sell my VGAD back to VGS at some point, but not sure how I will force myself to do it.  I suspect it will be if the AUD gets to above 0.8 against the USD.  An arbitrary line in the sand, but at least one I can try to commit to and force the action (and realise a 33% relative currency gain, if it plays out). 

Alchemisst

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4879 on: March 25, 2020, 06:09:13 PM »
What brokers do you guys use? I have been using comsec just because I've been with them for a long time and ease of use, I know they aren't the cheapest and have been meaning to change for a while, any recommendations?

Wadiman

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4880 on: March 25, 2020, 08:11:52 PM »
I use selfwealth and have been pretty happy with them - flat fee of 9.95 irrespective of trade value and CHESS sponsored.

mjr

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4881 on: March 26, 2020, 01:03:13 AM »
But what about for the mustachian?  What if they take $10-20k out of their super (let's assume they've chosen the index option inside super) and re-invest it in the index outside super?  Pay

It's really hard to get money into super, I can't imagine that anyone who's fair dinkum about retiring early would care about $20k taken out of super and reinvested in taxable accounts.

Dropbear

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4882 on: March 26, 2020, 02:31:46 AM »
It's really hard to get money into super, I can't imagine that anyone who's fair dinkum about retiring early would care about $20k taken out of super and reinvested in taxable accounts.

Haha, good point.

Dropbear

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4883 on: March 26, 2020, 02:49:29 AM »
Has anyone picked up the VESG Vanguard Ethically Conscious International Shares Index ETF, or its managed fund equivalent?

It's relatively new and small, but has outperformed VGS over its first year for the same 0.18% management fee.  It appears that VESG also has a higher weighting towards tech, financials, and health care than VGS, perhaps this is as a result of having lower (non-renewable) energy holdings?

Has anyone done any deeper exploration of it?  I'm interested if it might be a reasonable way to add some weight towards greener or smarter businesses, while still being a broad-based and cheap index fund?

Fresh Bread

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4884 on: March 26, 2020, 05:40:15 AM »
I have a big chunk in the wholesale fund. It's very new yes, we got into it to avoid fossil fuel extraction although there's still processing in there IIRC. You'd know more than me about performance as I'm too scared to look.

Eucalyptus

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4885 on: March 28, 2020, 04:19:24 AM »
I have a big chunk in the wholesale fund. It's very new yes, we got into it to avoid fossil fuel extraction although there's still processing in there IIRC. You'd know more than me about performance as I'm too scared to look.


The ethical funds are doing much better than VAS and the S&P500 don't worry.


Dropbear

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4886 on: March 28, 2020, 05:15:41 AM »
I have a big chunk in the wholesale fund. It's very new yes, we got into it to avoid fossil fuel extraction although there's still processing in there IIRC. You'd know more than me about performance as I'm too scared to look.
The ethical funds are doing much better than VAS and the S&P500 don't worry.

Further to the ethical fund questions - is it worthwhile holding both ethical and general funds for diversification reasons (VESG and VGS for ethical and general versions of international ex-Australia Vanguard funds respectively), or is it safe enough and potentially lucrative to switch out of VGS and into VESG?

Fresh Bread

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4887 on: March 28, 2020, 04:25:42 PM »
I have a big chunk in the wholesale fund. It's very new yes, we got into it to avoid fossil fuel extraction although there's still processing in there IIRC. You'd know more than me about performance as I'm too scared to look.
The ethical funds are doing much better than VAS and the S&P500 don't worry.

Further to the ethical fund questions - is it worthwhile holding both ethical and general funds for diversification reasons (VESG and VGS for ethical and general versions of international ex-Australia Vanguard funds respectively), or is it safe enough and potentially lucrative to switch out of VGS and into VESG?

We have both. I think it is something like 40% international/40% Aussie /20% ethically conscious. As I said, I'm not looking - not until we are coming back out the other side.

I think should we suddenly be confident enough to invest some cash (our other income streams are looking sketchy right now!) then it will go in the ethical fund.

I think we did a spreadsheet to identify what was excluded from the fund but memory is fuzzy so must have been my husband. Will look. Definitely remember there being some sketchy companies that are still included, but you have to draw the line somewhere, otherwise you'd only be investing in B-Corp ones and I still want to be in an index fund.

Separate question / similar topic:

I've been meaning to change my super to an ethical. Is it a bad idea to move it while the market is down or doesn't it make any difference? My husband's instinctive answer was not to, but if I'm just switching not cashing in, it's fine, yeah?

deborah

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4888 on: March 28, 2020, 04:52:59 PM »
I'd switch whenever you want to. We've been about to move some investments for a while, and it's happening at the moment, because the ones we want to sell are quite close in value to the ones we want to buy. It's the best differential we've seen since November when we decided to do it.

MrThatsDifferent

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4889 on: March 30, 2020, 01:56:16 AM »
I have a mate who reckons himself a stock expert and thinks we should convert our supers to bonds and then convert it back when things stabilize. Does this make sense? Should we be doing this?

deborah

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4890 on: March 30, 2020, 02:03:50 AM »
I have a mate who reckons himself a stock expert and thinks we should convert our supers to bonds and then convert it back when things stabilize. Does this make sense? Should we be doing this?
What does your investment plan say?

chevy1956

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4891 on: March 30, 2020, 04:06:39 AM »
I have a mate who reckons himself a stock expert and thinks we should convert our supers to bonds and then convert it back when things stabilize. Does this make sense? Should we be doing this?

This is why you need an investment plan. I don't have one written down but you need to take decisions like this out of your hand. People will always come up with advice like this. Sometimes they will be right. That doesn't mean you will make money from their advice. Sometimes they will be wrong.

Work out your investment allocation in Super and stick to it. I'm 100% stocks.

Adventures With Poopsie

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4892 on: March 30, 2020, 09:48:06 PM »
Nabtrade has been patchy on the high volume days.  I've been able do most of what I wanted eventually.  I'm accumulating, about 250k committed thus far and have about the same available. Wife and I also keeping 2 years expenses in cash accounts in case offsets freeze up.

Chris, can you explain what you mean about offsets freezing up? Can't say I have heard of it and am using the offset heavily for our EF/spending so would love to hear your thoughts!

MrThatsDifferent

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4893 on: March 31, 2020, 07:08:32 AM »
I have a mate who reckons himself a stock expert and thinks we should convert our supers to bonds and then convert it back when things stabilize. Does this make sense? Should we be doing this?
What does your investment plan say?

Iím just DCA and have my super in index funds and outside investments in Vanguard Lifestrategy. I wasnít planning on changing a thing, I just wanted to understand why heíd would be recommending that course of action? Iím going to ride this out.

bigchrisb

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4894 on: March 31, 2020, 09:47:18 AM »
Nabtrade has been patchy on the high volume days.  I've been able do most of what I wanted eventually.  I'm accumulating, about 250k committed thus far and have about the same available. Wife and I also keeping 2 years expenses in cash accounts in case offsets freeze up.

Chris, can you explain what you mean about offsets freezing up? Can't say I have heard of it and am using the offset heavily for our EF/spending so would love to hear your thoughts!

The bond markets have been crazy (as in GFC crazy) and were starting to freeze up until some pretty major central bank intervention. Our banks, and particularly the second tier lenders are heavily dependent upon there being liquidity in these markets.  I'm not worried about loss of the money in an offset or redraw, but I am worried about access being suspended for a period of time, or pre-payments not being released for redraw.

So I've made sure that my emergency fund cash is actually cash deposits - even though I'll lose a percent or two in interest.  I'm talking $30k kind of numbers.  The bulk of my investable cash is still in the offset.

Adventures With Poopsie

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4895 on: March 31, 2020, 06:51:50 PM »
Thanks so much for your response and explanation, Chris!

marty998

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4896 on: April 07, 2020, 02:30:58 AM »
Well we have our answer to what index fund investors do in a market fall. Remember all those doom and gloom articles saying we would sell sell sell and amplify the crash?

During March, the Vanguard ASX 300 ETF (VAS) went from 56 million units on issue to 64 million units on issue.

Seems we are the type to never let a crisis go to waste.

mjr

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4897 on: April 07, 2020, 02:56:40 AM »
Ha !  Good find.  Well done to all of us.

chevy1956

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4898 on: April 07, 2020, 04:00:42 PM »
I like that update. I've bought more and I will buy again. I'm more concerned about buying bonds than stocks now.

UnleashHell

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Re: Australian Investing Thread
« Reply #4899 on: April 08, 2020, 05:27:59 AM »
the s&p dropped yesterday.
THE TOP IS IN!