Author Topic: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021  (Read 9685 times)

sixwings

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #150 on: February 28, 2021, 10:19:34 AM »
Anyone done potatoes in grow bags? I won't have space in my garden for potatoes but I love fresh potatoes and am thinking of giving grow bags a shot. Any advice? I bought some kennebec potato starters, and I think I'll get a variety pack as well.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #151 on: March 01, 2021, 03:08:10 AM »
Yesterday I sowed 3 pots of parsley, which will take 4 weeks to grow.

I am giving my remaining kaffir lime seeds a last chance. I soaked them in water. They all floated, which a professional on TV said was not promising. I put them on wet kitchen paper towel with plastic over to prevent drying out.

The chili peppers are growing fine, as well as the many lovage plants.

MudPuppy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #152 on: March 01, 2021, 05:25:08 AM »
@sixwings inhabe and the effort isnít worth the reward imo

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #153 on: March 01, 2021, 06:27:21 AM »
Yesterday I sowed 3 pots of parsley, which will take 4 weeks to grow.

I am giving my remaining kaffir lime seeds a last chance. I soaked them in water. They all floated, which a professional on TV said was not promising. I put them on wet kitchen paper towel with plastic over to prevent drying out.


I soaked 5 clementine seeds overnight in a glass full of water.  4 sank overnight, and all 4 germinated.  The 5th was still floating and I threw it out. 

How long did you leave your seeds in the water?

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #154 on: March 01, 2021, 10:29:32 AM »
@RetiredAt63  - I did some research on the bay leaf tree cuttings.  Unfortunately, I really cut the tree back last fall so that I could bring it inside.  And it is only now sending out some tiny leaves of new growth.  Cuttings are supposed to be taken on flexible wood, (mine has none) at six inches of length (definitely none).  I will see how quickly it grows, but I fear that I should have kept the cuttings last fall when I harvested leaves.  I probably would have had two dozen new plants. 

Wm Dam is shipping 98% of my order.  I asked for pick up and they refunded the shipping a couple of weeks ago.  I do not want to pay for shipping on the items remaining on back order - promix seed starting soil.  Hopefully someone will call and sort this out. I really wanted an excuse to go for a long drive somewhere.  Right now I pretty much go no where.

In the meantime the urge to garden drove me to the TSC store for a bag of miracle grow. (Highlight of the weekend - going to the tractor supply company and the vacuum store - my life is really glamorous)

I now have potted up a dozen 4 inch pots of seedlings that had gotten too big for the cell plug tray - arugula, Chinese cabbage and bok choi.  I refilled those empty rows in the 72 hole tray with more herbs.  The rows that were sown at the same time as the speedy plants I potted up already, are just starting to come along.  But there was a setback last week -  I got things too hot and cooked the middle part of the flat.  The spinach, kale and arugula appear to be recovering.  The outer edges were fine. Some old basil and parsley seed have germinated.  Fresh herbs are in my near future.

Also started a 144 plug tray with more arugula, spinach and lettuce and some collected chard seed.  I am not sure how viable the chard is or if the arugula is even arugula.  It could be a mustard or kale. Hopefully the greenhouse will be warm enough by the time they need potting up. 

I read the instructions on my soil temperature monitor and hopefully have got that figured so no more cooking the baby plants.

I ordered seed potato from Vesey's along with strawberry plants (ever bearing) and Ann (gold) and Royalty (purplish) raspberries.  Out at the farm we have a lot of raspberries, but not these two varieties.  By the end of the month I hope to have them all pruned and thinned for a good harvest and the new canes will fill in two rows that were incomplete last summer.

I am really enjoying watching gardening youtube.  Charles Dowding and Huw Richards are my favourites.  I started cutting up cardboard for my multi-sowing onion experiments.  I can't believe how much I still don't know about growing food!  I really wish I was retired so I could go (more) nuts on gardening and storing food.






RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #155 on: March 01, 2021, 02:51:11 PM »
Frugal Lizard, don't worry about the bay cuttings.  I will try to find a local source, but if I don't I have been using dried bay leaves for decades, I will survive.    ;-)

I'm also growing things I never bothered to before - I think the pandemic has triggered some survival instinct in me.  Or maybe now that I don't have a whole yard to look after I am thinking more about my vegetable garden?

For general interest, I tried the starter pots from toilet paper rolls and don't like them.  The cardboard grabs water from the potting soil so I am watering more, but then the cardboard dries out in my dry winter air and I am watering again.  I lost one tomato seed to what looks like damping off, which hasn't happened to me in decades.  So I am going back to plastic starter pots/trays, if treated carefully they last for years.  I am sure the petroleum used is less than the gas I burn going to the garden   ;/   I ordered some starter trays and a little grow light from Canadian Tire this morning and my curb-side pickup is ready - more ready than I am, I won't be able to go until tomorrow.





Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #156 on: March 02, 2021, 04:22:34 AM »
Yesterday I sowed 3 pots of parsley, which will take 4 weeks to grow.

I am giving my remaining kaffir lime seeds a last chance. I soaked them in water. They all floated, which a professional on TV said was not promising. I put them on wet kitchen paper towel with plastic over to prevent drying out.


I soaked 5 clementine seeds overnight in a glass full of water.  4 sank overnight, and all 4 germinated.  The 5th was still floating and I threw it out. 

How long did you leave your seeds in the water?

I left them for many hours, but don't remember if it was overnight. I didn't throw away any, as this is all I have left.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #157 on: March 02, 2021, 07:04:28 AM »
Yesterday I sowed 3 pots of parsley, which will take 4 weeks to grow.

I am giving my remaining kaffir lime seeds a last chance. I soaked them in water. They all floated, which a professional on TV said was not promising. I put them on wet kitchen paper towel with plastic over to prevent drying out.


I soaked 5 clementine seeds overnight in a glass full of water.  4 sank overnight, and all 4 germinated.  The 5th was still floating and I threw it out. 

How long did you leave your seeds in the water?

I left them for many hours, but don't remember if it was overnight. I didn't throw away any, as this is all I have left.

I hope you get at least one germinating.  I  had mine in the oven with the light on so probably about 25/26C.

Anette

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #158 on: March 02, 2021, 09:05:52 AM »
Regarding my cats in my  flower beds problem I was cutting my roses last week and came up with this solution. We will see whether it makes a difference.

Also I have wasted a ton of time this past week learning about raised flower / vegetable beds. Watched  hours worth of YouTube bodies learning about growing things in Australia from Mike at Self sufficient meď. I shall find out whether that has much to do with gardening in Germany

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #159 on: March 02, 2021, 10:23:36 AM »
Good one @Anette -- a thorn in the paw might work.

Ya'll, I desperately need a new wheelbarrow.  After years of our old heavy piece of crap wheelbarrow I just can't take it anymore.  It's time. 

GreenEggs

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #160 on: March 02, 2021, 10:54:28 AM »
I was looking for an interesting, quick-growing, ground cover for a large natural area in our yard.  I found this small variegated bamboo variety ( Sasa Veitchii  ).  I found it at an online nursery for about $40-50, which seemed like a lot of money for something that should grow like a weed.  (I'm assuming that it's quick growing, most bamboo is, right?)  It has tiny 1/8" diameter culms which grow to 3-5' tall but can be kept as a ground cover if mowed once each Spring.  I found it on eBay for $27 including shipping.  The seller just happened to live about 40 miles away.


Here's a pic.  Isn't it pretty?  :)





1-SASA-VEITCHII-BAMBOO-PLANT-RHIZOME-12-034-L-X-1-4-034-W










the_hobbitish

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #161 on: March 02, 2021, 09:24:04 PM »
@GreenEggs I suggest checking if it spreads by underground rhizomes before you buy it. Many bamboo species can be really invasive and very hard to stop from spreading into places you don't want them. There's a lot of stories in my area of people having to pay a ton of money for specialized removal when their bamboo encroached on their neighbors.

Sun Hat

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #162 on: March 03, 2021, 06:30:36 AM »
Regarding my cats in my  flower beds problem I was cutting my roses last week and came up with this solution. We will see whether it makes a difference.

I do 'chop and drop' mulching and can attest to the deterrent effect of stepping on rose thorns while gardening barefoot. It's not quite enough to get me to wear shoes, but plenty to get me to avoid stepping into the beds around the roses. Hopefully the cats share my aversion to thorns and aren't as indifferent as my dog, who happily traipses amond the rose bushes while on his way to go eat the prickly raspberry canes.

It's a happy day here, as I've started my tomatoes and peppers on a warming mat. I haven't built my little greenhouse out of my old window panes yet, so I'll have to hustle to get it done before they sprout!

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #163 on: March 03, 2021, 06:41:45 AM »
My big seed order arrived from Wm. Dam
And I nearly cooked the first flat again!

I think I need to seed a lot more so that I am not trying to stop babying seedlings and end up neglecting them.  Still working out some of the hiccups in the system (the flat that nearly got cooked in the middle, had mold starting in one corner along the outer part of the flat.)

Potted up greens are looking very happy.

GreenEggs

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #164 on: March 03, 2021, 07:52:41 AM »
@GreenEggs I suggest checking if it spreads by underground rhizomes before you buy it. Many bamboo species can be really invasive and very hard to stop from spreading into places you don't want them. There's a lot of stories in my area of people having to pay a ton of money for specialized removal when their bamboo encroached on their neighbors.


Thanks for the warning.  I hadn't heard about people having to pay for removal when it encroaches into the neighboring properties.  The area I want to place it borders the lake on one side and is surrounded by our yard, which is kept mowed.  From what I've read, regular mowing prevents bamboo from spreading.  Barrier materials are also available to contain bamboo, but it needs to be 24" deep for most species which would be quite a chore to install. 


Considering the price of this cultivar I'd think a nursery would pay a property owner to eradicate it! ;) 


draco44

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #165 on: March 03, 2021, 09:35:18 AM »
Anyone done potatoes in grow bags? I won't have space in my garden for potatoes but I love fresh potatoes and am thinking of giving grow bags a shot. Any advice? I bought some kennebec potato starters, and I think I'll get a variety pack as well.

When my family tried this the yield was negligible, unfortunately. But growing conditions vary so much from place to place, I say give it a shot and embrace the experimental nature of gardening. If you've already got starters, might as well grow them somewhere! I do remember the bags dried out faster than expected, so my tip is to watch your watering.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #166 on: March 04, 2021, 02:59:59 PM »
I just transplanted all my pepper and tomato seedlings into nice plastic pots (these: https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/mckenzie-18-pot-seed-starter-1590290p.html?rrec=true#spc).  I also bought these (https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/mckenzie-21-cell-seed-starting-tray-3-in-0591680p.html#srp) but they are too deep for where the seedlings are now.  Which is, pathetic roots.  The TP rolls make sucky horrible useless starting pots.  I'm so glad I was experimenting with them instead of using them for my main plantings.  The 21 cell cell-pack will be great for tomatoes later on, they will be nice and deep until I move them into really deep containers.  I like to have really good root systems when I move my plants to the garden, we have too short a growing season to waste time getting little baby tomatoes and peppers going.

The grow light (https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/mckenzie-greenhouse-light-kit-0591681p.html#srp) is 2' long, one tube, just right for one seed tray.  It doesn't look that strong, but I have the light and freshly-transplanted plants on the plant shelf, so the grow light is supplementing daylight (or vice versa).

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #167 on: March 05, 2021, 08:58:13 PM »
The garden version of
HAPPY DANCE
 
 BASIL(s)
*The Clove scented Basil* sprouted profusely - YAY - I can't wait to see and smell... I love the scent of clove.
Should be interesting for all sorts of applications and new culinary creations.
Trying a new variety of basil that everyone had good things to say about called "Mammolo" supposed to have a Genovese (Italian sweet basil) flavor, but improved, hardier and do better in the heat - we'll see. Good sign - it sprouted very well. I just threw it in with the tomato pots, but I think I'll seed some more in a couple of dedicated pots.
Lime Basil - I think my seeds are no good. Nothing came up last year or this year. I might order some fresh seeds again next year.
HOLY BASIL
The Tulsi 'Krishna' variety has also sprouted profusely - still tiny but looking healthy. So exciting - it is one of the best 'Holy Basil'.
Not sure yet what I will do with it but my inner plant Nerd was screaming at me to find and plant it.

MANDARINA
The new variety Mandarina (a new (Lemon) Balm - a herb for tea and cooking) is growing like a weed, already six to eight inches.
Turns out that the scent is to die for - strong but sweet, Mandarin citrus scent. Should be awesome in salads and in drinks. 
I'm especially excited because I thought that none of the seeds made it, but I tucked some into several different pots in addition to seeding some in the ground.

The 'German' Blackberries have also made an appearance, tiny yet, but they appear to be hardier than I expected - we'll see how they do and whether they will survive this coming summer.
So far looks like enough came up so that I can test them in different areas of the garden. I kept some seed back so I can try again in the fall.

The 'pink' Pride of Barbados or Dwarf Poinciana (small tree) - one of *my last two seeds* is up and looking promising.
These rare seeds were impossible to find so I am motivated to keep it happy. Fingers crossed.

Korean Mint
I found the first sprouts barely there this morning - YAY - happy dance!
I think this is the kind that makes a small bush - I lost my info.

I really need to keep a gardening journal with observations and plant data as I am trying out more new varieties of herbs and veggie

KALE
The *Russian Red* from Victory Seeds is outstanding in taste and appearance. Beautiful and tasty. I am happy that it did so well in a big window box.

OMG - every last one of the Kale *Dinosaur* is up and slowly getting stronger after one week. What will I do with this much Kale?
These will all go into the garden in three different spots once they are a decent size.
I'm worried about our warm weather next week - maybe I should have waited till fall again.

SAGE
Hoping for lots of Pineapple Sage - bright red blooms and a lovely taste and scent. It has become my favorite summer heat plant:).
Tequila Sage - also fire engine red and lovely in a summer garden - my first try with seeds, but so far nothing has come up yet.
Clary Sage in white and in pink - one white one is turning into a little monster in a big pot- the other white ones are beginning to like living in the garden. Haven't seeded the pink ones yet - maybe tomorrow.

SPINACH
New Zealand Spinach and Amaranth (Chinese Spinach) - both perennial veggies - we'll see how they do.

CARDOON - aka Wild Artichoke
I planted as directed three to a hole in a small garden bed - we'll see.

THIS WEEK - I've been on garden patrol every day - sometimes watering the seedlings three times a day so they stay moist.
NEXT WEEK - I've got about twenty more veggies, flowers and herbs to be seeded. Actually planted my first Zinnia seeds of the year yesterday - Old Mexico.
THEN it is full-on Zinnia time - I have at least ten to 15 different Zinnia seeds to play with - Butterfly Heaven.

I am itching to do some garden projects, but clean-up and planting have to come first and I must be done by the end of the first week in April with all things plant-related. That gives me about four weeks until the first week in May to do other projects - garden shower, solar lights, painting and styling the gazebo area, putting up a new shade gazebo, and some hardscape and pro landscaping, all before the summer heat sets in.
I want to do at least one fun project this coming week - we'll see how it goes.

Oh and thanks to youtube I am now thinking of stylin' up my garden umbrellas possibly with tassels, party lights and maybe elephants and palms for that tropical feeling - crazy, right? - crazy good and satisfying for people like me who love color and decor and feel the strong need to play and create.

The weather Gods are smiling on us all of next week - having a garden is such a wonderful thing, taking care of the land and creating a habitat for the wildlife is even better.
Happy Gardening everyone!
« Last Edit: March 05, 2021, 09:04:25 PM by Rosy »

Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #168 on: March 06, 2021, 03:45:43 AM »
Great update @Rosy!  I always love to hear what you're up to in tropical paradise.  And +1 on Red Russian kale.  It's my favorite garden vegetable. 

I still haven't sown anything indoors because we're going away (camping) for a week at the end of the month, and I don't want to ask anyone to have to take care of tiny plants in my grow cabinet.  And truth -- I'm a control freak about that and don't think anyone but me can get their little needs met just right, haha.  So I'll be late this year on tomato, cucumber and pepper starts.  Maybe it's a good thing to cool my jets a bit.  I put them out too early last year and then had to do heroic covering measures to save them all after we had a hard cold snap in May. 

So I'm spending time on other spring tasks like path maintenance, cleanup, fertilizing, pruning, and transplanting some perennials.  The serviceberry and sourwood trees I planted last year made it through the winter and are looking good.  My raspberries and elderberries continue to produce lots of babies.  My Hinonmaki gooseberry also successfully tip rooted last year, so I have a couple little gooseberry babies that I'm BERY excited about.  :)  That variety tastes the best. 

Last but not least I'll be field grafting some apple trees in the next couple of weeks for the first time.  I've done bench grafting successfully, so hopefully this will work as well.  I have a couple adult apple trees that are either not producing any fruit (the story of Bob, for those who remember in past threads) or producing lackluster fruit.  Grafting onto those two guys seems like the thing to do.   

Happy gardening everyone!

goat_music_generator

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #169 on: March 06, 2021, 06:23:02 AM »
@Rosy Sounds amazing! BTW, just a word of warning to be careful with the Korean mint. The Japanese version is quite invasive here in Maryland and toxic to livestock; I bet it would thrive where you are, too. And my guess is the Korean version is closely related.

It makes a delicious mojito, though :)

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #170 on: March 06, 2021, 07:51:13 AM »
@Rosy Wow
@Trifele  hear ya on seedling control and care...even though I have almost baked one flat twice
@goat_music_generator I was given a pack of Korean mint seed.  I will test it out taking care where I plant it out.  The people who own my borrowed land town garden have family from Korea. It may be a nice thank you for allowing me to grow wild at their place.

Today I am starting the onions leeks and pepper seeds.  Going to try one flat of plug / single seed, one flat of strips multi sown and one flat of plug tray multi sown.

So far - old cilantro seed has not germinated.  But old basil is viable!

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #171 on: March 06, 2021, 04:14:15 PM »
@Rosy Sounds amazing! BTW, just a word of warning to be careful with the Korean mint. The Japanese version is quite invasive here in Maryland and toxic to livestock; I bet it would thrive where you are, too. And my guess is the Korean version is closely related.

It makes a delicious mojito, though :)
@goat_music_generator
You had me at Mojito:). For now, it is planted only in one box that tends to stay considerably more moist than my regular pots for whatever unknown reason. Where it is situated it can't really do much if any damage even if it escaped it would be fine.
But - I looked it up......

Actually - google says this one is not an invasive spreader or toxic.

Quote
Korean licorice mint (Agastache rugosa) is also called purple giant hyssop and grows best in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 5 through 9. This bushy perennial herb reaches 48 inches tall spreading 18 inches wide. The semi-evergreen leaves, which smell strongly of mint and licorice, are topped with short spikes of tubular-shaped lavender-blue blossoms from midsummer through early fall. This herb is not invasive like true mint varieties and attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Korean licorice mint seeds germinate well indoors with just a little care.
Now I remember why I didn't seed it sooner - I'm not a huge fan of licorice taste in plants but I might plant out two or three in the back garden anyway given that this one gets to 48 in tall. There must have been another reason why I wanted this one though so I have to read up on it a bit more.
Doesn't sound like a good Mojito mint at all - boo.

@Trifele - yeah well, can't leave the babies with a stranger now can we?:) - I totally get that. Nobody cares for our plantlings like we do.
@Frugal Lizard - see the info on Korean mint it is actually a type of Hyssop so no worries.

Made another fine batch of garden tomato sauce today harvested fresh incl the herbs right before it started raining. Starting tomorrow it will be fantastic garden weather for a whole week.
I think this is the first time that all my tomatoes look magazine-worthy incl the mystery tomatoes.

the_hobbitish

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #172 on: March 06, 2021, 09:06:42 PM »
My little window setup has become a hodge podge of plant incubators. Started tomatoes and peppers, sweet peas, head lettuce, dahlias, and bachelor's buttons. I'm still waiting on some other flower seeds and a bare root rose order to arrive.

I ordered compost for my raised beds and mulch for the paths in hopes that it will inspire me get outside and get everything ready for spring. I'm not much on working in freezing weather, but planting season is just around the corner.

Anette

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #173 on: March 06, 2021, 11:59:08 PM »
Well I think I will have to be more careful about what I read on this forum.

I started reading this threat maybe two weeks ago and have since spent about 530Ä on our garden  !!!I

Reading here lead me to watching a lot of YouTube: Raised vegetable beds, Charles Dowding, Mike from self sufficient me..... After which my husband promised to built some raised garden beds which lead us to order one ( haven't picked it up yet) as it doesn't cost significantly more than building one. ( we will look at the quality and might built the other - at least two - we have planned)

Our garden slopes of the whole length of the border to our neighbours   (about 20 m, small gardens here in Germany). About 8 m of this in the back we would love to be able to make better use of so we bought and picked up L shaped "stones" to be able to fill and level up these beds ( plus the gravel to put underneath them) We have taken away some somewhat rotted wooden fencing which previously had been there and have ordered plants for an edible hedge to be planted instead:

Sea buckthorn (2)
Red currant
Black currant
Gooseberry
Raspberry
Blackberry
A fig tree
and a cornel cherry

So basically not very mustachian but hopefully a good investment in pleasant surroundings, nice fruit and our own vegetable garden.
It felt wonderful to spend time together in the garden yesterday to get started ( just clearing for now). Very cold but sunny day.
I love reading about your gardening adventures and @Rosy I frequently have to remind myself I am not in Florida, haha

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #174 on: March 07, 2021, 07:11:09 AM »
Quote
I love reading about your gardening adventures and @Rosy I frequently have to remind myself I am not in Florida, haha
@Annette - oh ja:) I know the feeling. I wish I could grow currants here they make such a nice tidy hedge. Funny, when I grew up there I always scoffed at the old people who unfailingly had neat rows of currant bushes in their gardens. Soo boring!
Now I wish I had those cheery red currants for that incredibly healthy juice in my own garden.

Quote
I started reading this threat maybe two weeks ago and have since spent about 530Ä on our garden  !!!
Sure, go on and blame it all on us:) - we're happy to oblige and raise your level of interest in gardening:).
I think money spent on perennial harvests of fruit and veggies is money well spent.
One of my goals is to find as many perennial veggies that we like eating as possible.

It is a topsy turvy gardening world - I've discovered that Queensland Australia (Mike on youtube - Self Sufficient Me) has the same climate as Tampa Bay. Finally, a gardener whose intel doesn't end with zone 7 better yet his enthusiasm is palatable and genuine.

@the_hobbitish - that is a great little setup in your window. Sweet!
I may have to move a few of my plant babies if it gets too hot next week or maybe I should do that today since I have a spot on a large table next to the kitchen door under the window - easy to keep an eye on.
The time for seedlings here in my corner of the world is pretty much over other than zinnias or cosmos.
Seeding the last of the hot weather veggies today probably about a week too late, but hey.

I'm planning a trip to the garden center on Tue, my annual spring gardening foray -  a few four packs of violas..., two geraniums, snapdragons, a couple of herbs and veggies depending.
Probably a trip to Lowes garden center Thur and a visit to a new-to-me tropical plant nursery next week.

It is time to wrap up the planting.
It is a cold morning in the fifties but we will get to 71 today so I am taking my time drinking coffee and browsing the net until it is at least fifty-nine - sixty degrees before I venture out into the garden:).

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #175 on: March 07, 2021, 11:59:46 AM »
Just having a little rest sit down.

The kids and I hung up 8 buckets on the maple trees in our garden.  The sap is running today. 

This morning I started the peppers.  I was so restrained.  I made a list of what varieties I had.  And how many plants I truly needed and then just rounded up a little to either fill a row in a plug tray or have a few spares.  NOT three times more than I can possibly use. 

After doing the same thing yesterday - and also figuring out which garden I was planting them out at, and what seed was old, I planted:
one flat for my kitchen garden with scallions and a few sweet onions and a few leeks, using the Dowding multi sow method.
one flat for my pantry garden with french shallots (only 40 seeds so two per plug), sweet white winged 3-4 per plug, bandit leeks 2 per plug
one flat of one inch wide strips with multi sown leeks, sweet white, sweet yellow, walla walla, giant sweet white spanish, an early leek, a large leek. 

I used up all the seed.  The old seed was heavily sown, so hopefully there will be some ok germination.  All the packets said sow by December 2020. 

I started 12 tomatillos with very old seed. 

I have a couple of really small plug trays that I have been using for starting.  Fairly easy to pot up into larger modules or individual pots. 

I was going to go out to prune raspberries this afternoon but there was no room in the car.  Instead I have just attempted to repair my beloved small holed watering can and a spigot.  Next - cut hardware cloth to create squirrel resistant covers for my wild flower seed trays. But I needed a little sit down.

goat_music_generator

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #176 on: March 07, 2021, 07:11:06 PM »
@Rosy Sounds amazing! BTW, just a word of warning to be careful with the Korean mint. The Japanese version is quite invasive here in Maryland and toxic to livestock; I bet it would thrive where you are, too. And my guess is the Korean version is closely related.

It makes a delicious mojito, though :)
@goat_music_generator
You had me at Mojito:). For now, it is planted only in one box that tends to stay considerably more moist than my regular pots for whatever unknown reason. Where it is situated it can't really do much if any damage even if it escaped it would be fine.
But - I looked it up......

Actually - google says this one is not an invasive spreader or toxic.

Quote
Korean licorice mint (Agastache rugosa) is also called purple giant hyssop and grows best in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 5 through 9. This bushy perennial herb reaches 48 inches tall spreading 18 inches wide. The semi-evergreen leaves, which smell strongly of mint and licorice, are topped with short spikes of tubular-shaped lavender-blue blossoms from midsummer through early fall. This herb is not invasive like true mint varieties and attracts bees, butterflies and hummingbirds. Korean licorice mint seeds germinate well indoors with just a little care.
Now I remember why I didn't seed it sooner - I'm not a huge fan of licorice taste in plants but I might plant out two or three in the back garden anyway given that this one gets to 48 in tall. There must have been another reason why I wanted this one though so I have to read up on it a bit more.
Doesn't sound like a good Mojito mint at all - boo.

Oh, interesting! I was confusing this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agastache_rugosa (not invasive)

With this:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perilla_frutescens (invasive, also very tasty)

We have a lot of shiso in our area so I guess I jumped to conclusions.

Who knows though -- might still be good for a mojito. There's always the experimental method to find out :-)

Linea_Norway

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #177 on: March 08, 2021, 01:21:44 AM »
Well I think I will have to be more careful about what I read on this forum.

I started reading this threat maybe two weeks ago and have since spent about 530Ä on our garden  !!!I

Reading here lead me to watching a lot of YouTube: Raised vegetable beds, Charles Dowding, Mike from self sufficient me..... After which my husband promised to built some raised garden beds which lead us to order one ( haven't picked it up yet) as it doesn't cost significantly more than building one. ( we will look at the quality and might built the other - at least two - we have planned)

Our garden slopes of the whole length of the border to our neighbours   (about 20 m, small gardens here in Germany). About 8 m of this in the back we would love to be able to make better use of so we bought and picked up L shaped "stones" to be able to fill and level up these beds ( plus the gravel to put underneath them) We have taken away some somewhat rotted wooden fencing which previously had been there and have ordered plants for an edible hedge to be planted instead:

Sea buckthorn (2)
Red currant
Black currant
Gooseberry
Raspberry
Blackberry
A fig tree
and a cornel cherry

So basically not very mustachian but hopefully a good investment in pleasant surroundings, nice fruit and our own vegetable garden.
It felt wonderful to spend time together in the garden yesterday to get started ( just clearing for now). Very cold but sunny day.
I love reading about your gardening adventures and @Rosy I frequently have to remind myself I am not in Florida, haha

Your hedge sounds like you are implementing permaculture, which is nice.

How do neighbours look at fruiting hedges, or in general at hedges that grow on the border of the plot? Should the owner of the hedge cut/maintain the hedge on both sides? Can the neighbour pick the berries on their side of the bush? In the house we grew up we could pick the raspberries that grew on our side of the neighbour's fence. I don't remember well, but I think we cut the neighbour's bushes on our side of the fence.

firstmatedavy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #178 on: March 08, 2021, 10:37:11 AM »
Anyone done potatoes in grow bags? I won't have space in my garden for potatoes but I love fresh potatoes and am thinking of giving grow bags a shot. Any advice? I bought some kennebec potato starters, and I think I'll get a variety pack as well.

I'm growing everything in grow bags (no yard) and one of them will have potatoes. We're going to get some Yukon golds at the grocery store, toss them in and see what happens.

firstmatedavy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #179 on: March 08, 2021, 10:45:56 AM »
MANDARINA
The new variety Mandarina (a new (Lemon) Balm - a herb for tea and cooking) is growing like a weed, already six to eight inches.
Turns out that the scent is to die for - strong but sweet, Mandarin citrus scent. Should be awesome in salads and in drinks. 
I'm especially excited because I thought that none of the seeds made it, but I tucked some into several different pots in addition to seeding some in the ground.

Lemon balm is one of my favorite plants because it's smells like happiness. (Which is probably one of the plant's pest-repellent chemicals being psychoactive in humans, but that's what most, maybe all relaxing herbal teas are.) Back when I had a house, the yard was full of the stuff. It definitely does grow like a weed.

I got some seeds for a lemon-scented variety. It's going in the *small* planting bags, because I don't trust it to be a companion plant to anything.

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #180 on: March 08, 2021, 12:36:22 PM »
Quote
Quote
I got some seeds for a lemon-scented variety. It's going in the *small* planting bags, because I don't trust it to be a companion plant to anything.
FirstMateDavey
I have the lemon-scented lemon balm in a flower bed - it does a great job of keeping out the weeds:) and seems to get along well with the Cosmos and the Zinnias. I think it is on the way to become a perennial in my garden - it stayed green all year long. I'd love that.
Unfortunately, it doesn't grow like a weed in my garden (our summers are too hot) but for the first time one pot of it survived just fine in a shadier area of the garden - so I am actually thrilled about that.
I'd plant it in the shade garden but I know it wouldn't stand a chance against the ferns that have naturalized there.
If it makes it one more year I think I'll be home free.

As for the Mandarina - since I threw seeds into so many different pots I can tell you:
 
1. Tomatoes seem to hate it - it is hardly growing and struggling.
2. Chamomile - they like each other but it looks like a weird pairing - they both look very healthy. I think that once the Chamomile sends up flower stalks it 
    look better and they will probably shade each other.
3. Geraniums aren't fond of it either - so I am definitely moving them out of that pot asap.

4. Celery - they get along fine and seem to be a good pairing - this pairing appears to be the most beneficial for both plants.
5. Calendula (Orange King) - demands its own space but otherwise it tolerates the Mandarina:) they look good and healthy together.

I do hope the Mandarina will work in the garden, just in case it doesn't I will do up two pots of it and keep them in the shadier area.

If you like the lemon balm you'll love the Mandarina variety.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #181 on: March 09, 2021, 03:47:31 PM »
Winter sown seeds in the unheated greenhouse under plastic and floating row covers are up.  Gonna plant some more seed

I have a number of tiny plugs of hardy greens.  As soon as they need potting up, I am going to move them out into the greenhouse.

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #182 on: March 09, 2021, 06:02:25 PM »
Deep watered in the 'tropical' area today. Rigged up support for my waterhose with a small trellis and let it rain while I weeded.

One of my white salvias from last year has bloomed all year long and still going strong - perennial - winner:).
I weeded a bit, cut back dry branches and discovered that
I have five Amaryllis about to bloom. YAY

One Amaryllis is just starting to split open - looks like it might be a red one. The others are still closed up tight. These were a gift from a garden friend so I don't know what they will look like - anticipation:).

The Fennel from last year is turning out to be a true perennial and the seeds from the mother plant that I sprinkled about in January have sprouted and are about 8 inches and looking healthy. The mother plant was a mess - I composted all but one nice piece in the ground and broke off another piece to try in a planter. Not sure if you can grow fennel in a pot?

Ended up with a nice new starter plant as I was weeding a pot - Lily of the Nile, this one is a smaller variety and the blooms are pastel blue.
I prefer the larger, bright blue ones but there is something appealing about this plant.
Two weekends ago I moved all the dark blue ones into the center area of the veggie garden - all potted.
I've tried some in various areas of the garden but they never bloom or get fat and happy - so I gave up on that.
I'll have to remember to move the last two garden fails into a nice pot. I'm running out of nice pots:).

This year I grew my own geraniums from pieces that broke off when the wind blew down the planters on the railing.
... and I separated two more so five new plants for free. There were seven ...:(.

Made some headway in the garden clean-up today - and - drumroll, harvested my first four Kale plants for a big pot of fabulous soup.
That Red Russian looks so pretty it is like bringing in a bouquet from the garden.

It was tender with a robust flavor - I sauteed it with thick bacon, added some olive oil, onions, carrots, celery, greens from a bunch of carrots - about fifteen-twenty minutes - then added boiling water, White Navy Bean Soup from Bear Creek (takes 10 minutes) and a half a cup of quick-cooking Barley.
Topped the plates with Parmesan shavings and served it with bread. Supper in 45 min (incl 15 minutes harvesting and prepping)
Mr. R. had seconds.

Frugal Lizard - you do an awful lot of work:) always interesting to see what you are up to.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #183 on: March 10, 2021, 05:52:13 PM »
I think I am just really good at describing what I do (a very good trait for a person making their living as a consultant no? - as long as my paying clients think I am working ALL the time for them too;-)

My farmer friend traded me her soil blockers. New from Lee Valley the set of three would be well over 100$.  I am going to dehydrate a box of peaches for her and her toddler. Too bad I planted all my onion seeds on the weekend.  I don't have anything needing soil blocks to sow for a few weeks.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #184 on: March 10, 2021, 09:12:15 PM »
My William Dam seeds are here!  More planting tomorrow!  Peppers!  Onions!
Frugal Lizard, how did you plant your onions?  It is years (decades?) since I have grown onions from seed, totally a newbie here.  I saw someplace that they should not have long day-lengths or they may bulb early - have you found this true?  Do you give them a shorter day-length?  I suppose if they are in the greenhouse instead of under your grow lights they will get the cool and short days they need.

Even with the warmer days we have about a foot of snow on the ground, and the road in the community garden is not plowed, so no chance to direct sow anything for a while yet.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #185 on: March 11, 2021, 05:27:28 AM »
@RetiredAt63 - I believe all the varieties Wm Dam carries are long day onions.  I move them out to natural daylight of greenhouse as early as possible because of space so they are only under lights for five weeks.  And that is 14 hours because I have one timer.  In my experience bulb size is triggered by the flower being removed so I have often given the seedlings a trim (and trimming them makes them much easier to transplant).  Onion sets are more susceptible to day length change, I believe.

You could do some winter sowing on your balcony for early transplants into the garden. 

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #186 on: March 11, 2021, 07:02:41 AM »
@RetiredAt63 - I believe all the varieties Wm Dam carries are long day onions.  I move them out to natural daylight of greenhouse as early as possible because of space so they are only under lights for five weeks.  And that is 14 hours because I have one timer.  In my experience bulb size is triggered by the flower being removed so I have often given the seedlings a trim (and trimming them makes them much easier to transplant).  Onion sets are more susceptible to day length change, I believe.

You could do some winter sowing on your balcony for early transplants into the garden.

Yes, my onion varieties are both long day varieties.  I was more concerned about the seedling day length.  They won't get the grow light, the peppers get it.  Are onion seedlings OK with nights still in the -5 to -10C range?  That is what anything on the balcony will be exposed to.  Will they even germinate?   Germinating them inside and then having the seedlings exposed to super cold nights seems even riskier.

I may also put some on the window sill in the craft room.  They will only get natural light there.  Biggest issue is having them share window sill space with Misty.

Credit to William Dam, all the seeds are untreated.  One pepper and one pea from Stokes are treated.  I would not have ordered them if I had known.  I suppose it is someplace on the web page, but I didn't see it.  I want my soil fungi to be happy.  I will probably dab the seeds with damp paper towel before planting to get as much off as possible.

Trimming onion seedlings is such a radical idea, but I keep seeing it suggested, so will try it.  The other thing I will try when I do the transplanting is giving some their own space and having others 2 super close together.  I actually like onions that are flat on one side, so much easier to slice.  Not as aesthetically pleasing, perhaps.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #187 on: March 11, 2021, 07:11:43 AM »
@RetiredAt63 - I believe all the varieties Wm Dam carries are long day onions.  I move them out to natural daylight of greenhouse as early as possible because of space so they are only under lights for five weeks.  And that is 14 hours because I have one timer.  In my experience bulb size is triggered by the flower being removed so I have often given the seedlings a trim (and trimming them makes them much easier to transplant).  Onion sets are more susceptible to day length change, I believe.

You could do some winter sowing on your balcony for early transplants into the garden.

Yes, my onion varieties are both long day varieties.  I was more concerned about the seedling day length.  They won't get the grow light, the peppers get it.  Are onion seedlings OK with nights still in the -5 to -10C range?  That is what anything on the balcony will be exposed to.  Will they even germinate?   Germinating them inside and then having the seedlings exposed to super cold nights seems even riskier.

I may also put some on the window sill in the craft room.  They will only get natural light there.  Biggest issue is having them share window sill space with Misty.

Credit to William Dam, all the seeds are untreated.  One pepper and one pea from Stokes are treated.  I would not have ordered them if I had known.  I suppose it is someplace on the web page, but I didn't see it.  I want my soil fungi to be happy.  I will probably dab the seeds with damp paper towel before planting to get as much off as possible.

Trimming onion seedlings is such a radical idea, but I keep seeing it suggested, so will try it.  The other thing I will try when I do the transplanting is giving some their own space and having others 2 super close together.  I actually like onions that are flat on one side, so much easier to slice.  Not as aesthetically pleasing, perhaps.
Onions take so long, they should just be inside until overnight temperatures are not dipping below 2C. But if you don't have a huge number you could get them out in the day into brighter lighters and come in for night time. I was thinking of winter sowing for spinach, kale, lettuce in covered containers for getting a jump start on the leafy greens.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #188 on: March 11, 2021, 09:37:00 AM »
@RetiredAt63 - I believe all the varieties Wm Dam carries are long day onions.  I move them out to natural daylight of greenhouse as early as possible because of space so they are only under lights for five weeks.  And that is 14 hours because I have one timer.  In my experience bulb size is triggered by the flower being removed so I have often given the seedlings a trim (and trimming them makes them much easier to transplant).  Onion sets are more susceptible to day length change, I believe.

You could do some winter sowing on your balcony for early transplants into the garden.

Yes, my onion varieties are both long day varieties.  I was more concerned about the seedling day length.  They won't get the grow light, the peppers get it.  Are onion seedlings OK with nights still in the -5 to -10C range?  That is what anything on the balcony will be exposed to.  Will they even germinate?   Germinating them inside and then having the seedlings exposed to super cold nights seems even riskier.

I may also put some on the window sill in the craft room.  They will only get natural light there.  Biggest issue is having them share window sill space with Misty.

Credit to William Dam, all the seeds are untreated.  One pepper and one pea from Stokes are treated.  I would not have ordered them if I had known.  I suppose it is someplace on the web page, but I didn't see it.  I want my soil fungi to be happy.  I will probably dab the seeds with damp paper towel before planting to get as much off as possible.

Trimming onion seedlings is such a radical idea, but I keep seeing it suggested, so will try it.  The other thing I will try when I do the transplanting is giving some their own space and having others 2 super close together.  I actually like onions that are flat on one side, so much easier to slice.  Not as aesthetically pleasing, perhaps.
Onions take so long, they should just be inside until overnight temperatures are not dipping below 2C. But if you don't have a huge number you could get them out in the day into brighter lighters and come in for night time. I was thinking of winter sowing for spinach, kale, lettuce in covered containers for getting a jump start on the leafy greens.

Thanks.  Peppers are in the oven.  I'll just start the onions at room temp and put them on a window sill once they germinate.  With the blinds closed that should be cooler than the rest of the apartment.

Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #189 on: March 12, 2021, 06:38:16 AM »
Onions from new seed are up. 
Nothing on the peppers yet.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #190 on: March 12, 2021, 01:24:29 PM »
Onions from new seed are up. 
Nothing on the peppers yet.

You are way ahead of me!  But then, so is your zone.   ;-)

William Dam seed packaging says 7-10 days for onions at 21C.

Rosy

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #191 on: March 12, 2021, 02:24:46 PM »
Cardoon (Wild Artichoke) is up in the garden about 2 inches tall and fat and happy looking so far. I'm truly astounded, it has been only about a week since I planted the seeds.

Amaranth (Chinese Spinach) is up in the window box and in a huge pot. Hoping it will transplant well into the garden.
Today I seeded some in the garden - fingers crossed that it is not too late to seed outside.

Kale (Dinosaur) is looking stronger. I seeded in degradable seed pots, a method which I often have no success with - I usually do better if I just plant my seeds in window boxes. I'll have to google about when and how to plant them in the garden.
I'm planning on keeping a couple in a shadier area in a big pot - maybe they will be perennial in my area.
I've got no idea what I'm doin':) just playing and testing. I've got extra seed so I can plant them again in the fall if we like the taste and they actually grow well.

Tomorrow I will re-seed the New Zealand Spinach that I most likely trampled to death (don't ask) or maybe it just takes more than five days to come up (you get spoiled in Florida - some things literally sprout overnight). Besides, I also want to try a second batch in a different area.
We'll see.

Zinnias - seeded out eight different varieties yesterday and seven varieties today. Still have about ten more to go - we'll see how far I get tomorrow.
Also composted another bed today.
I went a little wild with the Zinnia seeds last year. This year I ordered three new kinds that were sold out last year.
My inner plant Nerd is bouncing with happiness - grinning from ear to ear.

Failure
May have to reseed the Verbena, Valerian, Tequila Sage and Pineapple Sage - not one sprout in two weeks - bummer. I think I may have fried the seeds. Debating whether I should order a Tequila Sage and a Pineapple Sage live plant online - I'm tempted.

See @Frugal Lizard - you are not the only one who fries their seeds:)- it simply dried out faster than I could rewater. I'll have to try again in my trusty window box with moisture soil. Forget the seedling stuff - it is just not working for me. This time I'll set them in the more shady area.

Spanish Lavender - YAY - finally, lots of plant babies in the window box. Lavender is tricky in my area, most years they don't survive even in a pot but Spanish Lavender is rather pretty, smells fantastic, and deals with the heat and humidity better than any other variety that I have tried.
Of course, nobody carries it locally, except at the plant fair but I found the seeds online so I was anxiously waiting to see if they would actually sprout.

I'm still re-potting and dividing, fertilizing, and weeding - haven't been to the nurseries this week as I planned.
It is OK - things may be moving a bit slower than I want, but I can finally see some order returning to the wilderness that I call my garden.

With a little bit of luck, I might meet my timetable for spring gardening in zone 10 - at least the zinnias can be seeded all the way into May, but tomorrow is my last veggie and herb seed planting until fall.
I might just take a break on Monday and do a little garden project and repaint some garden decor.

Wishing you a successful gardening weekend!:)


Trifele

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #192 on: March 15, 2021, 04:15:44 AM »
It was a good weekend here!  I still haven't planted any seeds (because we're going to be gone in a couple weeks, and I won't be here to care for seedlings.)  I spent time this weekend:

-- Transplanting spearmint.  I planted two plants last year and they spread like crazy, so this spring I have lots of little child plants to work with.  I also have a new area to plant them right next to the house.  I love spearmint, and drink it as tea almost every day.  Looking forward to lots more plants this year!  Extra bonus -- deer don't eat it!  Which is the only reason I can plant it near the house, outside the garden. 

-- Hoeing, weeding, and bed prep.  Our new puppy is a hilarious companion and helper in these endeavors.  For planting she is NOT an asset, however, and I have to go it alone.  :)

-- Path maintenance, hauling wood chips .  I bought a new wheelbarrow!  Yay!  It is feather light by comparison.  Fun fact -- composite/plastic wheelbarrows outsell metal ones by a huge margin in this area because we're in the mountains.  There are two directions here really -- up and down -- and on an uphill trip you really, really want a light wheelbarrow.  Chalk it up to my cheapness/frugality that I stubbornly continued with the old metal one for five years before I buckled and got the plastic one.  Shoulda done it sooner. 

-- I bought a cheap redbud tree at Aldi.  I didn't realize they ever had trees there (?) but there it was.  I'm now working on where to plant that guy.  We have one full size redbud now, and the bees adore it.  They literally sound happy and excited when they eat from it.  A fantastic and beautiful native for pollinators. 

Have a good week everyone!

the_hobbitish

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #193 on: March 15, 2021, 06:45:16 AM »
I binge watched the Dowding channel on YouTube this weekend. It's really soothing and I like that he's about inexpensive time saving methods. It inspired me to get going with seedlings. I think I have all the seeds started that I'll need through the summer except for some kale. I ran out of makeshift seed trays and will have to direct sow a handful instead.

An order of compost and mulch arrived this morning and is blocking my driveway. I plan to cardboard and mulch my paths this year to get a handle on the weeds. I'm guessing it's a full day or two of work, but it's back down to freezing and I don't really want to be in the yard. I'm going to have to suck it up and get it done if I want to get out to get groceries this week. 😆

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #194 on: March 15, 2021, 11:03:03 AM »
I binge watched the Dowding channel on YouTube this weekend. It's really soothing and I like that he's about inexpensive time saving methods. It inspired me to get going with seedlings. I think I have all the seeds started that I'll need through the summer except for some kale. I ran out of makeshift seed trays and will have to direct sow a handful instead.

An order of compost and mulch arrived this morning and is blocking my driveway. I plan to cardboard and mulch my paths this year to get a handle on the weeds. I'm guessing it's a full day or two of work, but it's back down to freezing and I don't really want to be in the yard. I'm going to have to suck it up and get it done if I want to get out to get groceries this week. 😆

All the manual labour of clearing the driveway will warm you up.    ;-)
We are at -10C, at freezing sounds good.

the_hobbitish

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #195 on: March 15, 2021, 11:10:50 AM »
@RetiredAt63 you're so right. It's 35 and I'm shedding layers. I'm thankful the sleet storm held off until tomorrow though. Not something to do in the wet.


Frugal Lizard

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #196 on: March 15, 2021, 01:05:05 PM »
@RetiredAt63 - I have way more space to fill so I am pushing the limits on starting stuff. 

I gotta brag about my seed starting set up my dearest created.  Look what I am growing!  Don't you love how leeks grow?
Second photo is the onion experiment - some of the old seed is coming up really well.  Some is .... waiting.....
Needed some herbs for eating now in photo 3 plus some green for transplanting into the green house next weekend.
photo 4 is mainly chinese cabbage - it is pretty happy.  Never grown it before.  We should be able to harvest some of the outer leaves alla Dowding.

the_hobbitish

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #197 on: March 15, 2021, 03:50:42 PM »
Nice set up frugal lizard. That's a serious amount of baby plants.

Mulch and compost are in. I ran out of cardboard base layer. Can't wait to put some plants in it!


RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #198 on: March 15, 2021, 04:52:48 PM »
@RetiredAt63 you're so right. It's 35 and I'm shedding layers. I'm thankful the sleet storm held off until tomorrow though. Not something to do in the wet.




Oooh, very nice.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Planting and Growing Your Own -- 2021
« Reply #199 on: March 15, 2021, 05:00:25 PM »
Frugal Lizard, that is looking good.

At the house I had a great seed starting setup.  I had a 4' long and 6' tall chrome shelving unit in the kitchen/dining area (tile floor, safe for plants) in front of the sliding doors to the deck, south-facing.  On that I had 3 4' shop lights with good bulbs for growing.  I used to start all my own plants plus extras for our garden club to sell at our fund raiser.  The rooted sweet potato slips alone made us a good chunk of money.

All that went when I moved.  I have had to start from scratch for the setup here - even if I had kept the shelf and lights, I have no place to put them.  So I am trying to keep things contained.  I am glad I bought the 3' long 4' tall wire shelf for the living room as a plant stand, it has extra space on it for my seedlings.  Once our weather is reliably warmish I will start moving things out to the balcony gradually.  The apartment location is a zone warmer than the community garden (cities are heat island, we know) so I can do that.  And since I am here, if an extra cold night comes, everything can come back in.