Author Topic: Super Blog vs Traditional Publishing  (Read 735 times)

JG in Hangzhou

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Super Blog vs Traditional Publishing
« on: March 06, 2017, 08:08:02 PM »
Here's my dilemma.  I've created a lot of cool resources for teaching during the last seven years running my English Language school in China.  Tons of publishable games, books and content.   

Now I've finally got time to organize it in a way to share, distribute, capitalize on the work I've already done. 

While I've started reaching out to publishers, I haven't had any formal meetings yet.  How to prepare, and what to be wary of. 
Also, should I consider starting a blog?   How long does it take to attract an audience? 
How to balance what should be protected by seeking out a traditional publishing route or what could be distributed via a blog to generate more interest in publishable content?

Also, I have some experiential learning  software products I have use but would need additional development to package for sale.  Anyone have experience publishing learning software or can point me to appropriate resource to learn more about this aspect?   


SeattleCPA

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Re: Super Blog vs Traditional Publishing
« Reply #1 on: March 07, 2017, 08:04:29 AM »
I think blogs and ebooks offer more opportunity these days than traditional publishing.

I'd poke around White Coat Investor and look at pages like this to get an idea as to the upside:

http://whitecoatinvestor.com/state-of-the-blog-2017/

BTW, I share this only to add context to my remarks... here's amazon's list of the traditional books I've written:

https://www.amazon.com/Stephen-L.-Nelson/e/B001IGNMO6
My blog Evergreen Small Business
My free downloadable ebook: Thirteen Word Retirement Plan

Guy Ensenada

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Re: Super Blog vs Traditional Publishing
« Reply #2 on: March 07, 2017, 08:43:58 AM »
Here's my dilemma.  I've created a lot of cool resources for teaching during the last seven years running my English Language school in China.

Hey JG, what grade levels do you teach? I am doing some work with some students from China at the college I work for. They tell me I ought to consider going into consulting (they call it agent) with families to help them find colleges and universities stateside to connect them to. May be an opportunity there.....

JG in Hangzhou

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Re: Super Blog vs Traditional Publishing
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2017, 09:22:04 PM »

Hey JG, what grade levels do you teach? I am doing some work with some students from China at the college I work for. They tell me I ought to consider going into consulting (they call it agent) with families to help them find colleges and universities stateside to connect them to. May be an opportunity there.....

Guy - I know a Chinese neighbor who does this.  There is definitely a market for it.  While I have considered it, I haven't gone down this route as most of what I see in China are agents taking money from parents and not providing real value.   If you can build a relationship with college recruiters in the USA, you might be able to break into this market quite easily.  My advice is to avoid working with the current Chinese agencies like Shinyway, etc. as you might get morally disappointed when you see how they handle customer service. 
 
My school has students from Age 6 to 14.  About 50% of my top class move on to go to high school in Canada, Australia or the US.  It's really how I designed the whole school, to accelerate them to a Grade six reading level by the time they reach Grade 6.  Given that the school system here requires about a second grade reading level and almost no speaking level to get into high school, that can be a challenge for students that start late.  Most of my students are from middle or upper class families here and start early so they have the potential, however, outside of a language school, they have little or no opportunities to practice. 

Given that, if you are in a desirable living area in the US and have access to High Schools or Universities that are interested in actively recruiting Chinese, I would be willing to partner up to try to match what the schools are looking for and what the students here are interested in...

JG in Hangzhou

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Re: Super Blog vs Traditional Publishing
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2017, 09:40:45 PM »
I think blogs and ebooks offer more opportunity these days than traditional publishing.

I'd poke around White Coat Investor and look at pages like this to get an idea as to the upside:

http://whitecoatinvestor.com/state-of-the-blog-2017/

BTW, I share this only to add context to my remarks... here's amazon's list of the traditional books I've written:

https://www.amazon.com/Stephen-L.-Nelson/e/B001IGNMO6
So this strategy involves blogging on some regular basic to attract a readership in order to advertise books, eBooks or other products related to the blog, correct?
It seems the White Coat Investor still has a 'published' (self-published?) book available on Amazon. 
Perhaps the best approach is to finish the products first, then start the blog...
 

SeattleCPA

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Re: Super Blog vs Traditional Publishing
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2017, 07:51:29 AM »
I think blogs and ebooks offer more opportunity these days than traditional publishing.

I'd poke around White Coat Investor and look at pages like this to get an idea as to the upside:

http://whitecoatinvestor.com/state-of-the-blog-2017/

BTW, I share this only to add context to my remarks... here's amazon's list of the traditional books I've written:

https://www.amazon.com/Stephen-L.-Nelson/e/B001IGNMO6
So this strategy involves blogging on some regular basic to attract a readership in order to advertise books, eBooks or other products related to the blog, correct?
It seems the White Coat Investor still has a 'published' (self-published?) book available on Amazon. 
Perhaps the best approach is to finish the products first, then start the blog...
 

I would look again at this revenue from various sources... The print book is way less significant than the blog-related revenue. Also, the blog is feeding those print book sales, I'm sure. Not the other way around.

I would think you start with a blog, build your audience, and then begin monetization via either informational products or advertising or both.
My blog Evergreen Small Business
My free downloadable ebook: Thirteen Word Retirement Plan

Guy Ensenada

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Re: Super Blog vs Traditional Publishing
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2017, 11:35:23 AM »

Hey JG, what grade levels do you teach? I am doing some work with some students from China at the college I work for. They tell me I ought to consider going into consulting (they call it agent) with families to help them find colleges and universities stateside to connect them to. May be an opportunity there.....

Guy - I know a Chinese neighbor who does this.  There is definitely a market for it.  While I have considered it, I haven't gone down this route as most of what I see in China are agents taking money from parents and not providing real value.   If you can build a relationship with college recruiters in the USA, you might be able to break into this market quite easily.  My advice is to avoid working with the current Chinese agencies like Shinyway, etc. as you might get morally disappointed when you see how they handle customer service. 
 
My school has students from Age 6 to 14.  About 50% of my top class move on to go to high school in Canada, Australia or the US.  It's really how I designed the whole school, to accelerate them to a Grade six reading level by the time they reach Grade 6.  Given that the school system here requires about a second grade reading level and almost no speaking level to get into high school, that can be a challenge for students that start late.  Most of my students are from middle or upper class families here and start early so they have the potential, however, outside of a language school, they have little or no opportunities to practice. 

Given that, if you are in a desirable living area in the US and have access to High Schools or Universities that are interested in actively recruiting Chinese, I would be willing to partner up to try to match what the schools are looking for and what the students here are interested in...

I think we could be on to something- long story I will gladly share via PM. Feel free to contact me, but we are thinking on the same lines and very similar values.