Author Topic: Name your "side hustle"  (Read 42006 times)

Captain Cactus

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #100 on: May 22, 2018, 05:41:53 PM »
Update on my screen printed apparel business:  have met with vendors to discuss print costs/capabilities.  Going to start attending SBA meetings in my area.  Also getting a SCORE mentor.  Taking baby steps because Iím working full time.  Canít wait til the day I can report that Iím open for business!



Thank you all for your replies.  So much to think about.  I'm now considering the option of contracting out the screen printing itself to a local vendor to avoid the upfront capital cost of equipment purchase.

Captain Cactus

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #101 on: December 10, 2019, 06:09:48 AM »
Thank you all for your replies.  So much to think about.  I'm now considering the option of contracting out the screen printing itself to a local vendor to avoid the upfront capital cost of equipment purchase.

I am happy to report that I followed through on this... developed some design ideas, found an artist to make them look good, and then found a local hip print shop to produce my shirts. 

Now I recognize that this forum may not be the best place to talk about fabricating material possessions but I figured it was worth sharing, and Iím kinda proud of what weíve done so far.

Interested in the costs?  Here goes:
Design cost me $150.
Blank shirts cost me around $6 apiece (certified organic cotton, made in USA vs the cheap $2 Gildan shirts made by slaves somewhere overseas).
Printing was $3 per garment.  I ordered 53 of them in various sizes.
So with some random fees theyíre about $10/shirt to produce, not including the cost of design.
I am selling them on Etsy to keep startup costs down while I test my concept. 
Selling for $25 plus free shipping...aiming for around $10 profit per shirt.  I had them priced slightly higher and was planning on donating a percentage of profits to a non profit but I canít get anyone to call me back or respond to my outreach... hmmm.

Anyway, here it is! 

« Last Edit: January 26, 2022, 10:28:43 AM by Captain Cactus »

Fish Sweet

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #102 on: December 16, 2019, 11:27:59 AM »
Iíll take any and all feedback.  My feelings might get hurt but I need to grow and improve so I have a product people are willing to buy!
I don't have feedback or critique for you quite yet-- just some thoughts and questions that I think you might want to dig into so you can focus your sale efforts:

- Flip your perspective around a little-- don't think about producing a product that people will buy, because at the end of the day, "people" will pay money (sometimes a lot of money) for just about fricken anything-- a banana taped to a wall, a 20k coffee dispenser, face creams that correspond with your horoscope, a kiss, whatever.  It's a matter of enticing the right people (the kind of people who your product appeals to) and getting it in front of their eyes, and distinguishing what you offer from the rest of the pack.

- With that in mind, describe the kind of people who you think are your target market-- and I don't mean "people who are into the NE vibe", but flesh them out, personify them.  Are they locals?  Tourists? Do they buy organic and cruelty free?  Do they not care about that stuff? Are they cost conscious? Progressive?  Conservative? White? Japanese? Do they wear flannel?  Watch Game of Thrones? Do they have dogs? Kids? Do they drive Hondas, BMWS, Subarus?  Are they spendy people?  This isn't an exercise in stereotyping, mind you, and your ideal customer does not necessarily fit within certain ethnic groups, religion, car model, etc.  But no product appeals to everyone, so you have to know who your stuff appeals to.

- How do those people-- your target market-- shop?  Are they computer literate?  Do they go on Etsy? Ebay? Amazon marketplace?  If they want a t-shirt, do they probably buy it from Old Navy or their local craft fair? Are they on instagram? Facebook?  Twitter? Are they buying this for themselves, or for a friend or family member?  How do you get your products in front of the right set of eyes?  And if the right set of eyes see your shirt design, what are you hoping will 'hook' them?   

Chris Pascale

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #103 on: December 16, 2019, 01:35:58 PM »
Adjunct professor.

But I've done a ton of other stuff - ghostwriting, Uber driving, etc.

I've edited some books, but mostly for free for projects I really like. It's so involved, and I really work hard to be the very best editor the project could ever have, that I don't want to waste my time on something I don't like.

iwannaretire

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #104 on: December 16, 2019, 06:55:21 PM »


Interested in the costs?  Here goes:
Design cost me $150.
Blank shirts cost me around $6 apiece (certified organic cotton, made in USA vs the cheap $2 Gildan shirts made by slaves somewhere overseas).
Printing was $3 per garment.  I ordered 53 of them in various sizes.
So with some random fees theyíre about $10/shirt to produce, not including the cost of design.
I am selling them on Etsy to keep startup costs down while I test my concept. 
Selling for $25 plus free shipping...aiming for around $10 profit per shirt.  I had them priced slightly higher and was planning on donating a percentage of profits to a non profit but I canít get anyone to call me back or respond to my outreach... hmmm.

Anyway, here it is! 

https://www.etsy.com/listing/732140218/connecticut-shirt-hartford-shirt?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=connecticut+oyster+shirt&ref=sr_gallery-1-1&organic_search_click=1&frs=1

Iíll take any and all feedback.  My feelings might get hurt but I need to grow and improve so I have a product people are willing to buy!
[/quote]

Here's a few thoughts from someone who sells t-shirts on Merch by Amazon, Etsy, Redbubble and various other PODs:

1.  Your competition is getting equivalent designs for $3-$10 each from overseas designers.  $150 is a lot for that design, which is very niche.

2.   I could not tell from the design itself what it was referring to.  It is too subtle to sell online.  For t-shirts, customers will spend about 5 seconds looking at your design and will rarely read the description.  I think it would be better for mom and pop shops and souvenir shops.  Perhaps take them to a local farmer's market.

3.  If you want to improve your sales and get the right customer online, I would recommend Pinterest and Instagram to promote the design.  On Pinterest, establish a board generally for people from Connecticut and one for tourists going to Connecticut.  Post a lot of things about Connecticut and include your shirt on them.  I don't do Intragram marketing, but I hear it is a good way to get views.

4.  If the design is successful, expect a thousand copycats from every nook and cranny of the globe.

5.  If you want to have your own t-shirt shop online without using other platforms, most people in the t-shirt business use Shopify.  That said, Etsy, Amazon and other PODs will do a lot of marketing for you and have a lot more business than you're going to get on a Shopify site.

Good luck!

DavidAnnArbor

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #105 on: December 17, 2019, 07:33:04 PM »
Lately my side hustle has been picking up bank account bonuses for opening up a new account.  I just got $500 for opening up a Chase business checking account. I hope to get another $1450 over the next two months.

goldenace1982

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #106 on: January 08, 2020, 08:54:43 AM »
Wow, lots of side hustles here...

Hello All

I am fairly new active member of this group buy a passive observer for a bit (couple months). I have started making a few shifts in my quest for financial independence.   As of late I am looking into i creasing my cash flow to help support my aging parents, as it seemed fair since they gave up their retirement savings to send me to college!!

I have been investing in real estate for a couple years, and things have been cooling off a lit here in Wisconsin,  so I am looking for a business to i crease their cash flow, ideally to $10k per month (they have many dr. bills and debt), but to begin with, perhaps 2 - 3 k per month to cover their mortgage.

In my quest for a cashflow business, i discovered ecommerce,  although not new, drop shipping in ecommerce seems to have been doing well.  I recently stumbled upon consultants that would stand up an ecommerce "store" for intial seed money, yielding in $1k cash flow per month in 3-6 mos guaranteed.  The initial seed would be $7k.

I was wondering if anyone has experienced drop ship ecommerce and provide some i sight into risk and confidence in some cashflow numbers or how i could proceed further with this opportunity?


I originally posted this on a different thread, i was suggested to try this thread to get activity.

goldenace1982

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #107 on: January 08, 2020, 01:19:39 PM »
Lately my side hustle has been picking up bank account bonuses for opening up a new account.  I just got $500 for opening up a Chase business checking account. I hope to get another $1450 over the next two months.

Do you see these impacting your credit score?  I have "heard" they do... but never tried.

nara

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #108 on: January 19, 2020, 04:11:29 PM »
I like this thread revival! Lots of great ideas mentioned.

My most successful side hustle has been teaching chunky blanket making classes. I took a class over the summer with the sole intention of giving out handmade Christmas gifts. One thing led to another and eventually I partnered with a local craft shop to begin selling my items. While my items didn't sell well there was a lot of interest in my offering how-to classes. My first class sold out within hours with over a thousand people interested. I began to offer more and when those all also sold out within hours, I felt like I was onto something.

I began to scale more to increase profits. I worked out an arrangement with the shop to reduce their fees since I was bringing in so much business. I began ordering my yarn in wholesale from China so I wasn't paying retail prices or running to Michael's several times a week for supplies. I also trained my husband to be my "assistant" and doubled my class size. I now bring in around $330 per class--but my goal is to get to $500 a class relatively soon.

I have big dreams of having a thriving make and take craft business similar to a Paint and Sip but where we teach a variety of popular classes on a regular basis such as soap making, candle making, sewing, etc. to corporate clients, parties, and small groups. But this is all new to me (I've never been an artist) and am really in shock and wondering if interest in these classes are sustainable over the long term.

I am transitioning out of my former business (an unrelated medical business), which I sold this year. I am an entrepreneur at heart and always need to be working on something that is MINE instead of growing someone else's company. I am not passionate anymore about my current career--so this little project gives me hope that maybe I can have something else to transition to and be successful at and which could support us financially. I have never had  job I truly loved before, so hoping this all works out!

My other (much less lucrative) side hustle is selling drop ship print on demand mugs on Etsy. I had a designed on Fiver create basic black and white mug designs for professionals in my field as gifts for passing their board exams. It is very niche, but several times a year after results are posted for each testing window, I have an influx of sales.

SailingOnASmallSailboat

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #109 on: January 19, 2020, 04:37:51 PM »
I like this thread revival! Lots of great ideas mentioned.

My most successful side hustle has been teaching chunky blanket making classes. I took a class over the summer with the sole intention of giving out handmade Christmas gifts. One thing led to another and eventually I partnered with a local craft shop to begin selling my items. While my items didn't sell well there was a lot of interest in my offering how-to classes. My first class sold out within hours with over a thousand people interested. I began to offer more and when those all also sold out within hours, I felt like I was onto something.

I began to scale more to increase profits. I worked out an arrangement with the shop to reduce their fees since I was bringing in so much business. I began ordering my yarn in wholesale from China so I wasn't paying retail prices or running to Michael's several times a week for supplies. I also trained my husband to be my "assistant" and doubled my class size. I now bring in around $330 per class--but my goal is to get to $500 a class relatively soon.

I have big dreams of having a thriving make and take craft business similar to a Paint and Sip but where we teach a variety of popular classes on a regular basis such as soap making, candle making, sewing, etc. to corporate clients, parties, and small groups. But this is all new to me (I've never been an artist) and am really in shock and wondering if interest in these classes are sustainable over the long term.

I am transitioning out of my former business (an unrelated medical business), which I sold this year. I am an entrepreneur at heart and always need to be working on something that is MINE instead of growing someone else's company. I am not passionate anymore about my current career--so this little project gives me hope that maybe I can have something else to transition to and be successful at and which could support us financially. I have never had  job I truly loved before, so hoping this all works out!

My other (much less lucrative) side hustle is selling drop ship print on demand mugs on Etsy. I had a designed on Fiver create basic black and white mug designs for professionals in my field as gifts for passing their board exams. It is very niche, but several times a year after results are posted for each testing window, I have an influx of sales.

Check out ways to offer classes online as well. It's a booming space with good reason. It's not quite the same as in-person, for sure, but if there are some concepts that translate to video it could be a good side-side biz.

DavidAnnArbor

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #110 on: February 05, 2020, 07:42:40 AM »
I don't know if this counts as a side hustle but over the last four months I opened up 4 business checking accounts and earned $2,450 in bonus interest from them.

$500 Chase business checking
$500 Fifth Third business checking
$700 Old National business checking
$750 Huntington Bank business checking

lexde

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #111 on: March 10, 2020, 11:34:56 AM »
My side hustle is just billing more hours at my FT job.

I really donít know anywhere else I can get a steady $50/hr. for as many hours as I can possibly work.

Iíve done bank bonuses as well but they arenít consistent.

LovinPSDs

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #112 on: April 09, 2020, 06:30:38 AM »
My side hustle is just billing more hours at my FT job.

I really donít know anywhere else I can get a steady $50/hr. for as many hours as I can possibly work.

Iíve done bank bonuses as well but they arenít consistent.

There isn't anything wrong with this... I wish my employer paid overtime.  I think in the winter months I'd buckle down and pay my house off REAL quick if I could.

Guy Ensenada

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #113 on: April 10, 2020, 10:58:53 AM »
I have done some side work in my local area for years. I'd like to scale it up. By day I am a mild mannered guidance counselor, helping students research and select transfer colleges or providing them with career counseling and planning. So I could market myself as a career coach or a college counselor. In my 2 plus decades, I've worked with students who have gone to Ivy League schools, Big 10 universities, elite liberal arts colleges, and everything in between. There's a lot of players in that space hyperfocused on Ivy League admission or worse, Aunt Becky style plans. I am more interested in helping kids find the RIGHT school for them, which I am fairly good at doing in my day job.

Steeze

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #114 on: April 10, 2020, 11:10:53 AM »
I am considering a niche screen printing business.  Mostly online, possibly some while customers in select locations.  Anybody know any screen printers?  Artists?

A friend of mine has a small printing biz - has an automated press, a couple embroidery machines, and some vinyl equipment. He specializes in orders under 1000 pieces but could do larger orders. Usually you can beat his prices if the orders are very large though. Most of his orders are in the 50-500 range for local schools, events, and contractors.

If your interested send me a PM and I’ll give you his contact info.

Edit: my bad didn’t realize this was from 2017!
« Last Edit: April 10, 2020, 12:22:31 PM by Steeze »

semiretired31

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #115 on: January 21, 2022, 12:04:34 AM »
usertesting.com. When I qualify for tests, I get paid $10 for 10-20 minutes of checking out another company's website and telling them what I think about it. I'm at the computer all day anyway so it's easy to spend a few minutes here and there to see if I qualify for a test. I make $100-200/mo. It's enough to cover my gym membership and pay for kids' school activities while also being something I can ignore when I don't want to do it.

As soon as I'm done chasing/coaching my kids on soccer weekends (a couple years left), I intend to start reffing a bunch.  Pretty good side gig in something I love.  Refs are severely needed, so should be all the opportunity I want.  Can't wait...
Do it! Yes, it's much needed. The kid reffing this weekend forgot that the teams switch sides after halftime. SMH!

A slippery slope.  Refs get treated horribly (I'm guilty at times) and then they no longer want to come out.  Then, the quality of reffing goes down because the refs get younger and younger.  Then.. people get even worse on the sidelines. 

I want to do it for a million reasons.  Love to watch youth soccer and be involved.  And, I think I can do a good job and improve the play for kids.  And... it's not a bad side gig.  There's money to be made.  Win/win/win...

Update. Iíve had my reffing license for 18 months and have been making some nice side money and enjoying the heck out of it. Definitely do more as my time is more my own. One more reason to look forward to full FI

Warlord1986

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #116 on: January 23, 2022, 02:31:22 PM »
Writing and editing research papers and grants. It's not super steady, but it brings in some money here and there.

I'm hoping to move into technical writing at some point. :)

SwordGuy

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #117 on: January 23, 2022, 06:01:04 PM »
Saw the @Captain Cactus  t-shirt comments and didn't at first realize how far back they were made. 

For anyone else interested in a similar business, I buy t-shirts online all the time.   Quite a few of them are taking orders for a period of time ((say 30 days from the advert going up) and THEN, AND ONLY THEN, do they go print them.   

In other words, they COLLECT THE MONEY FIRST and ONLY THEN INCUR THE MANUFACTURING EXPENSE, instead of the other order.  And there is no wastage because they only pay to print the ones they have sold.

This is a big deal.   You can't lose your shirt over-printing the wrong shirt if you do things in this order (assuming they were priced correctly).

I would recommend this for any business that can get away with it -- and more of them can do that than you might think. 


SwordGuy

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #118 on: January 23, 2022, 06:07:15 PM »
We've successfully retired, but when we did have side hustles, we:

1) Wrote and published a how-to journal for a club we were in.
2) Wrote technical articles for pay.
3) Wrote a book for royalties.
4) Renovated lightly distressed houses and rented them out.

Full details in the entrepreneurial article or in my journal, both linked in my tag line.

For anyone thinking about starting a business, I suggest you google "Pop-up Business School" articles and interviews.   The organization now goes by "Rebel Business School"  (Nothing to do with the US traitors in grey uniforms, they're Brits.)   They've got gobs of good insights and examples on how to start up a business with very little cash and no debt.

Captain Cactus

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #119 on: January 24, 2022, 06:16:38 AM »
Saw the @Captain Cactus  t-shirt comments and didn't at first realize how far back they were made. 

For anyone else interested in a similar business, I buy t-shirts online all the time.   Quite a few of them are taking orders for a period of time ((say 30 days from the advert going up) and THEN, AND ONLY THEN, do they go print them.   

In other words, they COLLECT THE MONEY FIRST and ONLY THEN INCUR THE MANUFACTURING EXPENSE, instead of the other order.  And there is no wastage because they only pay to print the ones they have sold.

This is a big deal.   You can't lose your shirt over-printing the wrong shirt if you do things in this order (assuming they were priced correctly).


Thanks for the mention ;)

I'll provide an update.

I actually went though with getting some designs by working with an artist... I really like 1 of those designs and was actually sold a good amount on Etsy (using one of those print on demand companies) but then the pandemic hit and turn around times slowed down so much that I just pulled my listings because I didn't want to deal with the customer service fallout.  I think there is some good potential with that one design...I won't go into details for the sake of anonymity but I'll say that I can honestly envision it on t-shirts, sweat shirts, stickers, bumper stickers, throw pillows, wall art, etc... I just don't want to deal with all of that myself while I'm handling a full time job and family.  Maybe there's some way to license out the design?  But I'm simply not savvy enough in that arena. 

For the t-shirts, I listed them for $39.99 I think (yeah, I know!!!) and I sold a steady stream around the holidays.  Of that, my "cut" was around $15/shirt after the cost of the shirt and the print on demand service.  I found that nobody seemed to care about premium quality organic cotton... so I reverted back to the lower quality Gilding shirts and they seemed to sell just as well. 

I would recommend this for any business that can get away with it -- and more of them can do that than you might think.

SailingOnASmallSailboat

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #120 on: January 24, 2022, 06:23:07 AM »
Side hustles here:

DH: created a software program for boaters that's been selling for a few years now. He's got some new upgrades he'll implement in the next month or so and will raise prices.

Me: one of those dreaded MLMs (running on residuals now, which is basically free money), podcast sponsorship, teaching at boat shows, and a couple of online courses for cruisers.

goodmoneygoodlife

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #121 on: January 28, 2022, 07:16:06 AM »
I mostly do e-commerce with a 1 product store, and code money printers for myself.

Probably want to move onto selling SaaS after the above 2 has fewer fires.

netloc

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #122 on: January 28, 2022, 08:10:30 AM »
usertesting.com. When I qualify for tests, I get paid $10 for 10-20 minutes of checking out another company's website and telling them what I think about it. I'm at the computer all day anyway so it's easy to spend a few minutes here and there to see if I qualify for a test. I make $100-200/mo. It's enough to cover my gym membership and pay for kids' school activities while also being something I can ignore when I don't want to do it.

As soon as I'm done chasing/coaching my kids on soccer weekends (a couple years left), I intend to start reffing a bunch.  Pretty good side gig in something I love.  Refs are severely needed, so should be all the opportunity I want.  Can't wait...
Do it! Yes, it's much needed. The kid reffing this weekend forgot that the teams switch sides after halftime. SMH!

A slippery slope.  Refs get treated horribly (I'm guilty at times) and then they no longer want to come out.  Then, the quality of reffing goes down because the refs get younger and younger.  Then.. people get even worse on the sidelines. 

I want to do it for a million reasons.  Love to watch youth soccer and be involved.  And, I think I can do a good job and improve the play for kids.  And... it's not a bad side gig.  There's money to be made.  Win/win/win...

Update. Iíve had my reffing license for 18 months and have been making some nice side money and enjoying the heck out of it. Definitely do more as my time is more my own. One more reason to look forward to full FI

If you don't mind my asking, what's the pay like per game? Age group and region of the country?

Refereeing soccer/basketball is the side hustle that I'm most interested in. I played both fairly competitively but then let them go to focus on college instead of trying to juggle a sport and school. Seems like a great way to stay in shape, keep the mind sharp, provide a kind of community service, and make money (of course). I think I was enough of a "student of the game" that if I dedicated myself I could potentially ref high level high school and club games. I've put it off the past few years but I know I'll never have an entirely clear schedule to dive in so I might as well just get the process started.

Like you I could envision myself continuing to do it even once FI.

semiretired31

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #123 on: February 16, 2022, 08:26:45 PM »
Iím in SE PA and here is a link to the fees for youth soccer.

https://www.epysa.org/referee-fees/

My understanding is that PIAA for junior high and high school is even more lucrative. Not there yet. But, planning to move in that direction eventually.

trc4897

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #124 on: February 23, 2022, 06:45:50 AM »
Last year I started a side hustle. I sell 3D printed items and also 3D print custom orders for people through Etsy. Another chunk of my side income last year was designing Peloton accessories for a friends Amazon store, although I doubt that continues much this year (everything launched last year). Will be working with him to find new products to go after!

Car Jack

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #125 on: February 23, 2022, 06:32:31 PM »
Well, because it does take some work, I'd say selling tradelines brings in the most cash money.  About $5500 last year.  I'm expecting this to build as I have been getting new credit cards over the last several years, so when the window opens for new cards, I always have some to add.

My second is scrapping electronics and metals.  I have an electronic scrapyard not far and on my route when I go out to see my mom.  Between this stuff and trailer loads of steel, I probably bring in maybe $300 a year.  I've also found that this scrap dealer pays more for junk silver coins than anyone else.  They've actually matched the guy on craigslist who used to be the #1 payer for me.

So not a cash generator, but a heating oil saver, I cut firewood and heat my house with it in a forced air wood furnace.  Fortunately, we do have an oil fired furnace as well so if I don't run the wood, we don't freeze.  I'd say we save around $2k a year in oil costs.

cupcakery

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #126 on: February 24, 2022, 06:20:13 AM »
I do some bookkeeping on the side.  I used to make about $10k a year, but it dropped to about $9k since COVID, because one of my clients went out of business and a couple downsized.  I make more per hour doing this than I make at my FT job, but it is more draining.  People do stupid stuff with their money and trying to reconcile their books is crazy making.  That and I don't like selling myself to attract clients, makes it better as a side thing for me rather than doing it FT.

netloc

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Re: Name your "side hustle"
« Reply #127 on: February 24, 2022, 06:37:37 AM »
Iím in SE PA and here is a link to the fees for youth soccer.

https://www.epysa.org/referee-fees/

My understanding is that PIAA for junior high and high school is even more lucrative. Not there yet. But, planning to move in that direction eventually.

Thanks. I'm actually in the same region!

I've had a few former coaches approach me about it and I believe they mostly do PIAA games.

I guess that's where they'd start me, but maybe they would recommend doing lower-level club games first. I'd prefer not to jump through hoops to get numerous certifications, but if that's what it takes to get up to speed I would do it.