Author Topic: Woodworking advice - Boarding up garage side entrance door  (Read 2326 times)

Sibley

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Woodworking advice - Boarding up garage side entrance door
« on: August 15, 2015, 01:42:31 PM »
Hi guys. I've got a project on the radar, and I could use some advice. My parents have a old wood siding garage, pretty basic design. It's got two people-sized doors in the back, one of which needs to boarded up. They have all the tools that could be needed, but skill is lacking. Dad used to be fully capable, but early dementia has taken its toll. He'll be helping out but I can't rely on him for how to do things or to fully develop a plan. I have limited experience, but I think I can manage as long as I have a plan.

So, I need to remove the threshold, framing, and fill in the opening somehow. I'll then be painting the exterior to match the rest of the garage. The outside of the garage is horizontal wood siding.

I can remove the door, threshold, and framing I think. To fill the opening, I was thinking of screwing in a large piece of plywood (to the studs next to it) and then putting siding over it. Would that work? Is there a better way? Also, what do I do about the edges on the outside? This isn't particularly visible, but I don't want to leave a raw 1/4 inch gap all around. Do I use caulk to fill it in?

Please help me get this to a workable plan. Thanks in advance

Telecaster

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Re: Woodworking advice - Boarding up garage side entrance door
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2015, 02:29:45 PM »
I can remove the door, threshold, and framing I think. To fill the opening, I was thinking of screwing in a large piece of plywood (to the studs next to it) and then putting siding over it. Would that work? Is there a better way? Also, what do I do about the edges on the outside? This isn't particularly visible, but I don't want to leave a raw 1/4 inch gap all around. Do I use caulk to fill it in?

Please help me get this to a workable plan. Thanks in advance

It would help to see a pic, because you want to match the existing construction.  But unless there is something funky going on, there is probably no need to remove the framing itself.   You will need to remove the jambs and moldings.    Then attach a new sill plate in the gap left by the door (presumably the rest of the garage also has a sill plate, so try to match is  there).    Typically studs are on 24 inch centers, and doors are typically wider than that, so it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to run a new stud right in the middle of the door frame. 

Then you want to match in the construction on the outside.   If there is plywood then siding, do that.   Otherwise just construct the exterior walls the same way they did.   You should caulk the joints, but you should be able to  make them much smaller than 1/4 inch. 

Sibley

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Re: Woodworking advice - Boarding up garage side entrance door
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2015, 04:15:59 PM »
Ok, dad sent some pictures and I did some googling.

By "framing", I meant the jambs and molding. I think there is a sill plate in the rest of the garage, so will do my best to match. But this not a fancy garage.

The studs are not 24 inches actually - built before that was standard. I think 32? Regardless, I'll figure out how to put a stud in and put it down the middle of the old door.

Not sure about plywood under the siding, I'll have to check it when I'm there. If I have time I may redo the old boarding up of the window, seen in the picture of the side (better view of the siding itself).

Pictures (hopefully this works):


Cadman

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Re: Woodworking advice - Boarding up garage side entrance door
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2015, 03:25:17 PM »
Hmm, that is some narrow lap siding. I think your biggest challenge is going to be blending the new to the old. Every time I've seen this done it always ends up looking "wrong".

Short of a specialized lumber mill, you might have some trouble finding pine lap boards, especially in that size and thickness. Then, no matter how careful you are, you'll have definite vertical lines where old meets new, even with a perfect fit. I try to avoid caulk since it attracts dirt, shrinks with age and would require a foam 'backer rod' in your application. You'll also need a good miter saw with a sharp 'trim' blade to avoid chipping/blowing out the edges of the pine. And when you get done, it will still be obvious there was a door there.

The best way to hide what you're doing is to add a little visual depth. I'd pull the door, leave the casings, and build a panel that fits the opening. Install it around the same depth as the old door slab. The 'narrow version (4"?)' of T1-11 could work. You can also get fir-grade siding and roughsawn soffit plywood at Men*rds that would do the job. Once you've cut it to fit the opening, attach a perimeter of 2x4's to the back and run a couple vertical. This will keep the plywood from bowing down the road. Paint it before installation including all edges and run construction screws through the perimeter into the casing to secure it, then caulk from the inside to seal out weather/bugs.

The eye will still know a door was there but it will no longer focus on how the siding doesn't match up right or how the new profile depth is a little 'off'.  And to do the job, all you need is a drill and a circ saw.




Sibley

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Re: Woodworking advice - Boarding up garage side entrance door
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2015, 04:30:20 PM »
We've been able to get replacement wood in the recent past. On the inside of the garage, you can see it's actually 5 or 6 inches wide, it works out to be 2 of the rows. I don't know if it's widely available, but this was pretty standard in the area so all the local places carry it at least.

I was over there this weekend for other reasons, and took a look in person. The wood at the bottom of the door frame is bad and needs to be replaced. Plus some other bad wood on the side, and the squirrels messed up the roof... you get the idea. But I did get the inside cleaned out some, including the 30 year old fridge.

The panel approach would be much easier, and given time constraints I may go that approach. This isn't really visible from the street too. Thanks :)

Fishindude

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Re: Woodworking advice - Boarding up garage side entrance door
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2015, 11:58:44 AM »
  • Strip out the door, jambs, casings, etc.
    Stud in the opening with 2x4's or 2x6's similar to the rest of the structure.
    Cover outside surface of studs with 7/16" OSB sheathing.
    Install exact same kind of siding flush and in line with existing siding. 
    If you want it to look right you will need to remove and reinstall all of the siding on that wall, otherwise you will see the butt joints in siding the exact shape of the old door opening.
    Paint as required.

Noahjoe

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Re: Woodworking advice - Boarding up garage side entrance door
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2015, 02:17:29 PM »
two more pennies:

the garage contacts the ground directly, and already looks punky. Use treated lumber where you can for ground contact fixes.

1. rip out old door/rotten wood.
2. measure opening in 3 places horizontally and vertically - top, middle, bottom.
3. cut framing for bottom measurement.
4. cut framing for top measurement.
5. subtract 3 inches and cut studs.
6. Make box out of said framing materials that should slide right into your old doorway.
7. Rip a plywood (I wouldn't use OSB in a spot that gets this wet) sheet to proper dimensions and remember that you measured in 3 places. this probably won't be square.
8. Fasten to framing box.
9. Add center stud to box. You now have a beautiful tiny wall.
10. Add some Typar/Tyvek/housewrap to your new box.
     10a. Finesse: predrill your box in a couple spots so you can set some screws and reduce shifting when you hit the existing wall. Or use a nailgun.
     10b. fasten a piece of siding to your box, preferably at the top, middle, and bottom - make sure it'll line up with the old stuff.
     10c. With someone on the outside of the garage, and someone inside, have them guide the whole assembly into place so it's as flush as possible with your old siding.
11. Screw the box into place.
12. Fasten siding.
13. Paint.

You'll still see the butt joint, but it'll look better than slapping it all together one board at a time. This way you can make sure it's going to make as good a connection as possible. Paint may do an appreciable job of hiding it at that point. I'm not sure if there's a filler made that would be suitable for this, but you could look into that as well.

  10a.