Author Topic: Pest control  (Read 4033 times)

madage

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  • Location: TX
Pest control
« on: October 17, 2012, 09:05:36 AM »
Our area is susceptible to insect pests, and I cannot abide cockroaches in my home. We've been paying for pest control for about the past 18 months, but I happened to be home the last time the pest control guy came through and noticed it took him about 15 minutes to treat both around our slab outside and inside our home. The bill for this was $73! I'd like to cancel the service and treat for the pests myself. Buying the chemicals online and a dedicated sprayer gives me a start up cost about equal to one company treatment, but the chemicals will last me at least a year, which should save significant money. Does anyone have experience with DIY pest control?

Doubi

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Re: Pest control
« Reply #1 on: October 17, 2012, 10:08:24 AM »
Look on Amazone for
Bifen XTS 25.1% Bifenthrin Oil Base Multi Use Pest Control Insecticide Concentrate 32 oz container
Sold by: Pest Control Pros

This stuff is highly concentrated. It used to be sold under an brand name at Home Depot in a dilluted form for 10 time the price you will pay on Amazone.

I use it at my winter home in Florida for fire ants and termites. Reading the instructions (available on the internet) attached with the product, it seem to be effective in killing about every type of existing bugs.

Good luck


Secret Stache

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Re: Pest control
« Reply #2 on: October 17, 2012, 11:34:46 AM »
I use a product called Talstar Pro which is similar to the one mentioned above.  You can get a pint of the stuff for $20-$30 online or check your local pest control store (I first found this at a pool/lawn chemical store).  It works great, 1 ounce per gallon, and use the pump sprayer to treat around the foundation of the home and any entry points.

You can also treat the lawn if you buy one of the attachements for a water hose or re-use one the bottles of weed 'n feed or pesticide that attaches to a hose.

twa2w

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Re: Pest control
« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2012, 03:26:33 PM »
You may want to also do a google search on the use of diatomaceous earth and the use of spices to control insects if you want to try a less toxic solution.

madage

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Re: Pest control
« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2012, 07:36:21 PM »
You may want to also do a google search on the use of diatomaceous earth and the use of spices to control insects if you want to try a less toxic solution.

Thanks for the suggestion on Diatomaceous earth. I'm concerned that won't work very well in our humid climate, unfortunately. Relative humidity is rarely below 50% here, and typically much higher.

Another Reader

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Re: Pest control
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2012, 08:07:45 PM »
Here's an excerpt from a University of Kentucky article on cockroach control using boric acid.  This is a much less toxic method.

BORIC ACID
 
People have been fighting cockroaches with boric acid for nearly a century. Boric acid is one of the most effective cockroach control agents ever developed provided that it is used correctly. Unfortunately, most people use it incorrectly, and in the process waste their money and effort. Boric acid may be used alone or in combination with the baiting techniques previously discussed.

 
Properties and Advantages

Boric acid is a wonderful tool for controlling cockroaches in homes, restaurants and other buildings. It is effective in extremely small amounts and retains its potency almost indefinitely provided the deposit remains dry. Unlike many insecticides, boric acid has no repellency to insects and, consequently, roaches return to treated areas repeatedly until they die. Boric acid is deadly to cockroaches, but is low in toxicity to people, pets and other nontarget animals. It is also odorless and contains no volatile solvents.

 
 
Boric acid is a white, inorganic powder chemically derived from boron and water. Boron is mined from vast mineral deposits in the ground and is used in countless consumer products, including laundry additives, toothpaste and mouthwash. Boric acid insecticide formulations can be purchased at hardware and grocery stores. The powder comes ready-to-use, i.e., no mixing or dilution is required. Formulations sold in plastic, squeeze-type bottles with narrow applicator tips are the easiest to use. (These containers are similar in appearance to the squeezable mustard and ketchup bottles found in restaurants).

 
 
Cockroaches succumb to boric acid when they crawl over treated areas. The tiny particles of powder adhere to the cockroaches' body, and the material is ingested as the roach preens the powder from its legs and antennae. Some boric acid is also absorbed through the greasy outer covering of the insect's body. All species of cockroaches are susceptible to boric acid provided the powder is applied into areas where the roaches are living.

 
 
Using Boric Acid Like a Pro

The key to success with boric acid is proper application. For best results, the powder should be applied in a very thin layer barely visible to the naked eye. Piles or heavy accumulations will be avoided by foraging cockroaches much as we would avoid walking through a snow drift. To apply a fine layer, shake the container and puff a small quantity of the powder into the target area. Manufacturers of boric acid often fill their containers too full of powder -- by using a container which is no more than two-thirds full, an airspace is created at the top which allows the dust to be puffed more easily (A few pennies or pebbles placed inside the container helps prevent the powder from caking). The trick is to give the container a shake, then puff a very light dusting of the powder into the area you wish to treat.

 
 
Avoid applying a heavy layer, and never apply the material with a spoon.

Where the powder is applied is just as important as how it's applied. Cockroaches prefer to live in cracks, crevices and secluded areas close to food, moisture and warmth. Kitchens and bathrooms are the most common areas to find cockroaches, although any area of a home may become infested if the infestation is severe, or if species other than the German cockroach are involved. Key areas for treatment include under/behind the refrigerator, stove and dishwasher, into the opening where plumbing pipes enter walls (such as under sinks and behind the commode, shower and washing machine), and into cracks along edges and corners inside cabinets and pantries. Oftentimes, there is a void (hollow space) under kitchen and bathroom cabinets which becomes a hiding place for cockroaches. This area can be accessed and treated by injecting powder through any existing gap at the top of the kickplate, or if none is present, by drilling a few small holes.

 
 
NEVER apply boric acid onto countertops or other exposed surfaces, especially those used to prepare food. Any visible residues should be wiped off with a damp cloth.


Ants can controlled with a strategic placement of Borax detergent mixed with sugar.