Author Topic: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment  (Read 1283 times)

shelivesthedream

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Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« on: March 03, 2017, 10:15:28 AM »
I'm in the market for a springform cake tin at the moment (and maybe a couple of other things over the next few years). I'd like something that's fairly BIFL (Buy It For a Long time, at least!) and in my internet searching non-stick surfaces are generally decried as not lasting, even when they're from a good brand. I'm currently looking at a stainless steel cake tin from a restaurant supply store.

I grew up with non-stick everything so I don't know what it's like to cook with "stick" stuff, but I like the idea that it doesn't have a "surface" that will come off. (There's also the idea of bits of Teflon in my food, which is a bit gross but not a deal-breaking concern.) However, I don't want to be stuck with something that causes endless tears, either because it's not very good or because I'm not using it properly. I'm willing to change my cooking habits (acquired two cast iron pans from a relative a while ago and really enjoy using them now I've got good at it) but I don't know what to expect the differences to be and how to adapt to them.

So: what do I need to know about buying and using "stick" cookware that will help me decide?

wonkette

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2017, 12:06:19 PM »
Where I am there is a ton of baking equipment available secondhand in good condition including fun novelty bundt pans and the like. I get the impression people use them a couple of times and then purge them.

Anyway, for springform and other cake pans I like the slick nonstick surface so I only have to lightly grease the pan, or not grease it at all. For fussier cakes having fat along the sides can make a difference. I use my pans only 4-6 times a year though, so ymmv.

Cali Nonya

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #2 on: March 03, 2017, 01:33:42 PM »
How do you feel about butter? (More specifically generally higher added fats to recipes).

I have cooked with lots of old steel and cast-iron since I like old inherited cookware, but the thing to keep in mind is that if you go back about a century recipes especially baking had more fats and less sugars, which is more compatible to older cookware.  I have a both modern non-stick and old timey cookware and will use either depending on the recipe, but I perfer glass, steel, and enamel and avoid Teflon whenever possible. 

Steel + butter = nonstick

Mgmny

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #3 on: March 03, 2017, 01:57:54 PM »
I agree with Cali Nonya!

I use stainless steel cookware for most of everything, and cast iron for frying and meats.  I have only 1 nonstick pan that i reserve for eggs and eggs only. I baby that pan and make sure to always cook at very low heats and cover it with a cloth when storing.

I do use nonstick and glass for baking, and do not use metal to cut things out of them, and I use lots of Crisco when baking.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #4 on: March 03, 2017, 02:09:23 PM »
Positive feelings about butter! Apart from greasing it thoroughly, what else do I need to know about caring for stainless steel bakeware? What washing utensils and cleaners can I use? Can anything damage it?

prognastat

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #5 on: March 03, 2017, 02:19:09 PM »
Positive feelings about butter! Apart from greasing it thoroughly, what else do I need to know about caring for stainless steel bakeware? What washing utensils and cleaners can I use? Can anything damage it?

From what I understand it is quite similar to cast iron in that it does have a seasoning that you need to not damage and maintain.

Doubleh

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #6 on: March 03, 2017, 03:29:32 PM »

From what I understand it is quite similar to cast iron in that it does have a seasoning that you need to not damage and maintain.

This is a new one on me - I have a carbon steel wok which I season and take care of similar to cast iron. But the stainless steel sauce pan & saute pan I've used daily for the last decade just get soaked in hit soapy water and lightly scrubbed if they really need it. But they actually rarely do as just a little oil or butter stops must stuff from sticking

Cali Nonya

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2017, 03:30:01 PM »
Not much damages stainless steel but use may discolor and of course scratching with steel utensil will scratch, but not make it unusable.

Bakeware should stay in good shape for ~50 yrs or so considering some of the old stuff I have gotten my hands on.  I've got stuff stamped 1910's that's in great shape.  Stove top pots & pans (more so than bakeware) can be scorched, this will cause discoloring, but doesn't actually harm anything.

prognastat

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #8 on: March 03, 2017, 03:37:37 PM »

From what I understand it is quite similar to cast iron in that it does have a seasoning that you need to not damage and maintain.

This is a new one on me - I have a carbon steel wok which I season and take care of similar to cast iron. But the stainless steel sauce pan & saute pan I've used daily for the last decade just get soaked in hit soapy water and lightly scrubbed if they really need it. But they actually rarely do as just a little oil or butter stops must stuff from sticking

That's totally on me, I missed the stainless part. I think as Cali mentioned stainless can still tarnish, but that's about it.

letired

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2017, 03:51:08 PM »
I loathe nonstick. I find it so creepy and I can't explain it. I also don't want to have to think about what utensil I'm using, and the stage where you get black flakes in your food is also ewwww.

Tips for using uncoated metal or glass bakeware:
  • greasing with oil of some kind is good. Using cool butter is good because then you can see where you've got and where you've missed.
  • greasing with oil then coating with flour is better, especially for things like cakes, etc. If I properly grease and flour the pan, my brownies never stick. I'm sure there is a video somewhere you can watch. When dumping out the excess flour, do it over something large for a while until you get better at controlling it otherwise you'll have flour everywhere. I recently heard a rumor you could do something similar with powdered sugar over butter, but I'd investigate more closely before trying it.
  • parchment paper is your friend, especially for fussy or fancy things that can't touch grease (ie angel food cake or something). Cutting out the shapes is a bit annoying, but will do the thing, and it's semi-reusable, depending on how you want to live.


I've also never heard of 'seasoning' bakeware.

prognastat

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2017, 03:55:03 PM »
I loathe nonstick. I find it so creepy and I can't explain it. I also don't want to have to think about what utensil I'm using, and the stage where you get black flakes in your food is also ewwww.

Tips for using uncoated metal or glass bakeware:
  • greasing with oil of some kind is good. Using cool butter is good because then you can see where you've got and where you've missed.
  • greasing with oil then coating with flour is better, especially for things like cakes, etc. If I properly grease and flour the pan, my brownies never stick. I'm sure there is a video somewhere you can watch. When dumping out the excess flour, do it over something large for a while until you get better at controlling it otherwise you'll have flour everywhere. I recently heard a rumor you could do something similar with powdered sugar over butter, but I'd investigate more closely before trying it.
  • parchment paper is your friend, especially for fussy or fancy things that can't touch grease (ie angel food cake or something). Cutting out the shapes is a bit annoying, but will do the thing, and it's semi-reusable, depending on how you want to live.


I've also never heard of 'seasoning' bakeware.

Cast iron and carbon steel need to be seasoned to use in cooking. Seasoning is applying some kind of oil on the surface and heating it to create a polymerized layer protecting the material and generally making it more non-stick too.

GizmoTX

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2017, 04:07:23 PM »
I'm to the point now where all of our cookware is stainless steel, carbon steel, or cast iron (including enameled), & only 2 egg pans have non-stick. They all have to work on our induction cooktop & while the seasoning of cast iron has to be considered, it won't flake like nonstick eventually does. Non-stick doesn't allow a fond (crispy brown bits that add flavor) to develop.

prognastat

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #12 on: March 03, 2017, 04:16:08 PM »
I'm to the point now where all of our cookware is stainless steel, carbon steel, or cast iron (including enameled), & only 2 egg pans have non-stick. They all have to work on our induction cooktop & while the seasoning of cast iron has to be considered, it won't flake like nonstick eventually does. Non-stick doesn't allow a fond (crispy brown bits that add flavor) to develop.

I only have a cast iron skillet at the moment, the rest all being non-stick, however I have some carbon steel skillets and some enameled cast iron stuff on my wish list that I'm hoping I will get gifted in the future to be able to try out.

Cranky

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #13 on: March 03, 2017, 04:32:12 PM »
Positive feelings about butter! Apart from greasing it thoroughly, what else do I need to know about caring for stainless steel bakeware? What washing utensils and cleaners can I use? Can anything damage it?

How often will you use a springform pan? I believe I bought mine in the early 70's, and it seems fine, but I make about one cheesecake/year.

The whole point of a springform pan is that the rim unhooks and comes off, so it's not all that critical that it doesn't stick, anyway - you just run the spatula around the side before you unlatch it. If you want, you can make a little collar of parchment paper to go around it, but I never bother.

You can probably buy bluetooth springform pans these days, but my pan makes a pretty great cheesecake!

Dicey

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #14 on: March 05, 2017, 12:26:53 AM »
You can probably buy bluetooth springform pans these days...
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KCalla

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2017, 10:36:51 PM »
By far the best bakeware I have used is a brand called:  USA pans.
I am slowly switching to only these.  They are more expensive than some.  They have performed very well for me the last 8 years and I think they will be "lifetime" pans.  You can find them on Amazon and at places like Bed Bath & Beyond, among others.
As far as, specifically a springform pan:  I'm another one who rarely uses mine.  Mine is an moderate level pan (not USA pan) that I found at a discount place like a TJ Maxx or Marshalls quite some time ago.  I line it with parchment to prevent sticking.  If you have an frequent use for a springform pan, get a USA pan.  If you are like me and rarely use it, keep an eye out for a discounted one.  Check the lock/latch before you buy it.  Also check that the bottom has not been bent or warped.

alewpanda

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Re: Using non-stick vs "stick" kitchen equipment
« Reply #16 on: March 09, 2017, 11:15:55 AM »
I swear I'm not a representative, but some of the best pans I've ever seen and that I currently own are Saladmaster pans.

Even the old, high quality stainless steel ones are practically indestructible.  People I know have had them for 30-40 years and they still are in excellent shape.

The newer stuff has a titanium coating or mix along with the stainless steel, which makes them more expensive.  You can get the older stuff on ebay for pretty cheap though.



A little bit of their baking soda mixture (which you can mix your own of...I'm told.  I don't know, I've been using the same bottle  -- of which i have two -- for 4 years now) and no matter how badly you burned it on, it will come off.  Its glorious...especially if you tend to overheat your pans.




For baking dishes, I use primarily stainless steel, and several glass pans for breads and pies.  Lots of butter or oil, and half a brain and even if you burn anything on, you can scrub it off.  I swear they invented new coatings for the sake of planned obsolescence.