Author Topic: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops  (Read 3636 times)

jeromedawg

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Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« on: January 30, 2015, 10:30:30 PM »
Hey guys,

So our faucet started having issues turning side-to-side recently in the kitchen and tonight the garbage disposal decided to jam up on me. Fortunately, I was able to get the disposal's flywheel unstuck after finding the right size hex key (ugh). The faucet issues were happening before this so it gave way to me finally getting around to looking at things. The nut holding it in place is pretty rusted and I don't know if I can easily unscrew the bolt. If not, it might be time to call the plumber. But while I'm on the subject, we've also been contemplating switching out the sink (currently I think it's one of those cast-iron porcelain-coated sinks that scratches and rusts easily in the corners when there are racks in the sinks). It's just pretty old and can get really nasty and gross.

If I'm going to have someone come in for the faucet, and since we've been thinking about the sink, should I consider doing the sink too? Then that leads to the next thing - I wouldn't necessarily want to do countertops but logically it would make sense if switching out the sink no? Or is that something that could easily be 'upgraded' at a later time if we want new countertops but want to keep the [newer] sink.

Just trying to figure out what I should tackle first. I'm not sure the faucet is gonna be a DIY if I can't remove the bolt though. So for now, I'm sort of planning to defer to a plumber if I can't get this thing fixed. So far I've sprayed a bit of wd40 into the bolt/screw and am letting that soak to see if it loosens.
« Last Edit: January 30, 2015, 10:37:32 PM by jplee3 »

jeromedawg

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #1 on: January 30, 2015, 10:52:44 PM »
So I think the WD40 helped a bit as I started turning the screw out of the bolt, but I'm scared to remove it all since it's so rusted. At this point I'm not sure I even know what I'm doing hahaha. It would probably be best just to replace the entire faucet at this point in time. It's just so hard to work under the sink with all the pipes from the disposal and other hoses in the way.

Seeking the Brass Ring

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #2 on: January 31, 2015, 07:13:15 AM »
I wouldn't pay anyone to replace a faucet.  It's not a complicated job and usually only requires wrenches and maybe teflon tape and plumbers putty.  Depending on the set up you might need a basin wrench but they are cheaper than calling a plumber.  Look online or get one of the DIY books from Home Depot about the step by step.

Once the old faucet is off, use some powdered cleaner ( I like barkeepers friend) and scrub the scratches and gunk on the sink.  You may need to use some lime away to dissolve the rust or lime scale on the sink.  If that doesn't do the job and you're really convinced that you need to replace the sink it's also a reasonable DIY project.  Do some internet research and get all the tools/supplies together before starting and maybe send others out of the house for the afternoon since the water will be off for a couple of hours.

Replacing the counter top is a whole 'nother thing but don't make that decision based on 'since the sink is out already' logic.  That's kinda like saying 'I may as well replace the motor since the air filter is out of the car'

Post some pics for more specific advise.

jeromedawg

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2015, 10:32:58 AM »
Thanks,

I'll probably replace the faucet myself. I was getting a bit carried away with the sink and countertops haha. But the reason is because the sink is an inset sink so I'm not sure but it seems like it would be a hassle to remove. I think cleaning up the sides and re-caulking is the best bet.

As far as the faucet, I checked and Price Pfister supposedly has a lifetime warranty on their faucets. So I sent them an email on their site explaining the condition with one of the pictures of the underside (showing rust) and will see what they say. It would be great if they were able to send out a new faucet but I'm not holding out on that either.

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2015, 10:33:50 PM »
It's a bit hard to see from that picture but I'm assuming that the stub next to the supply lines is the rusty bolt.  Grab that sucker with anything you can and turn counter clockwise.  Make sure it's counter clockwise.  Make sure it's counter clockwise. Make sure it's counter clockwise. :)

The only harm you're gonna do is destroying the faucet that you're planning to replace anyway, so there's no risk here.  Once it's loose it should be easy to lift the whole thing off the sink.  If it's stuck, tap sideways on the faucet base to un-stick it from the sink.  Then clean up the surface and mount the new one.

Happy trails.

jeromedawg

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #5 on: February 01, 2015, 08:46:32 AM »
It's a bit hard to see from that picture but I'm assuming that the stub next to the supply lines is the rusty bolt.  Grab that sucker with anything you can and turn counter clockwise.  Make sure it's counter clockwise.  Make sure it's counter clockwise. Make sure it's counter clockwise. :)

The only harm you're gonna do is destroying the faucet that you're planning to replace anyway, so there's no risk here.  Once it's loose it should be easy to lift the whole thing off the sink.  If it's stuck, tap sideways on the faucet base to un-stick it from the sink.  Then clean up the surface and mount the new one.

Happy trails.

Yep, that's it! The bolt is the shorter stub next to the supply lines. I didn't take the greatest picture cause I was reaching under to try to snap it since I put all the stuff back under the sink so as to not leave a mess. In any case, you're right, I'll need to somehow grab that thing - it's tricky cause there's so little space to work with. A basin wrench would have been perfect if not for the supply lines being *right* next to it ugh. The bolt is secured by an additional flat head screw from the bottom as well, and I was able to turn that a little bit after applying some WD40. I'm going to wait until I have a replacement faucet before removing this one but hopefully it'll come out without much pain.

LadyMuMu

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #6 on: February 01, 2015, 08:54:39 AM »
Replacing a faucet and even a sink are fairly easy but time consuming. It took my husband and I about 4 hours to do because we were newbies.

Also, I think you know this, but don't even think about getting new countertops unless the ones you have are chipped, broken or burnt. And even then, only if you have no debt and/or are about to put your house on the market. You can always take out the sink again and replace the countertops at a later date.

Le Barbu

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #7 on: February 01, 2015, 01:25:14 PM »
Sorry to hijack here but on a funny note, I repaired a faucet this afternoon using a Rainbow Loom (rubber band) to replace a worn spacer. It works fine now!

Kevan

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #8 on: February 06, 2015, 07:30:47 PM »
That bolt in the photograph is not important to you.  Originally there was a large C-shaped "washer" and nut on it and they held the faucet down to the sinktop.  I don't know where that hardware went, but since it's gone, one good whack under the faucet spout ought to dislodge the unit from the sink (assuming that your supply lines are disconnected).

alberteh

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #9 on: February 06, 2015, 11:55:59 PM »
worst case? cut off the bolt with a hacksaw and replace the faucet. takes time but is very effective.

ArtieStrongestInTheWorld

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2015, 01:05:46 PM »
Have you tried penetrating oil?  I would apply some of that to the bolt and let it sit for at least 24 hours.  It can work miracles. 

DLJ154

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Re: Trying to remove old faucet... dated sink and countertops
« Reply #11 on: February 13, 2015, 08:34:12 AM »
Beware those bolts can get very, very rusted and stuck.  I recently replaced the faucet in my house, thinking it would be a simple job as I had done it before in other sinks.  After using penetrating oil and buying and breaking a basin wrench, I ended up having to remove the entire sink to get the faucet off.  At this point I wish that I had replaced the sink while I was at it with something a little deeper.  The new faucet sprays a good amount of pressure from higher up than the old one, and it tends to splash out of the sink.  However, since I wasn't planning on removing the sink in the first place I was rushed just to get it back in.  Ensure you can get those nuts off before getting too far in the uninstall.  This is a pretty extreme case, but if you're going to remove the sink anyway and want to eventually replace it you may as well do it now.  Also, if you're thinking of new counters make sure the shape of your sink will fit the new counters you want; otherwise it would be wise to do the sink and counters at the same time.