Author Topic: Replacing a leather watch strap?  (Read 360 times)

BookLoverL

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Replacing a leather watch strap?
« on: September 26, 2018, 01:16:13 AM »
Hi everyone,

Does anyone know if it's possible to make my own leather watch strap to replace my current one, which is dying, and if so, how? I have access to both leather and sewing stuff.

I could go to town and buy a new one for like 10 or something, but it would be way more awesome if I could make my own for free.

The mechanism of my watch is still 100% fine, it's just the strap that is getting dodgier by the day.

Pics of my watch as it currently is attached, if I managed to figure out how to attach them properly.

Dave1442397

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Re: Replacing a leather watch strap?
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2018, 05:10:33 AM »
Some people make straps as a side business. You'll find plenty of them for sale on sites like Timezone - http://forums.timezone.com/index.php?t=threadt&frm_id=32

If you want to make your own - https://www.instructables.com/id/Leather-Watch-Strap/

I'm sure there are YouTube videos on the subject too.

lthenderson

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Re: Replacing a leather watch strap?
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2018, 06:39:59 AM »
I still see the occasional leather goods kit in hobby stores. They come with swatches of leather and tools to make simple things out of leather. I used one as a teen decades ago to make a belt that I still have even if it no longer fits. You might check a nearby hobby store to see if you can find one. But I'm guessing you won't be able to find one for under 10 pounds.

BookLoverL

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Re: Replacing a leather watch strap?
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2018, 10:15:50 AM »
Thanks - I'll take a look at the YouTube video.

I already actually have some leather that I bought for some reason several years ago (before I discovered Mustachianism) and never did anything with, and we have needles and thread (including stronger versions of both) and sharp knives and the like in the house already, so if I do decide that making my own is feasible, I expect the materials cost to be 0 (if it wouldn't be, then I probably won't do it). The reason I'm asking the question here is that I haven't tried anything like it before, unless you count stitching up a hole in a t-shirt and other simple sewing skills like that, so I wasn't really sure if it's a thing that novices can do easily or not. :3

AccidentalMiser

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Re: Replacing a leather watch strap?
« Reply #4 on: September 28, 2018, 05:10:20 AM »
Thanks - I'll take a look at the YouTube video.

I already actually have some leather that I bought for some reason several years ago (before I discovered Mustachianism) and never did anything with, and we have needles and thread (including stronger versions of both) and sharp knives and the like in the house already, so if I do decide that making my own is feasible, I expect the materials cost to be 0 (if it wouldn't be, then I probably won't do it). The reason I'm asking the question here is that I haven't tried anything like it before, unless you count stitching up a hole in a t-shirt and other simple sewing skills like that, so I wasn't really sure if it's a thing that novices can do easily or not. :3

If you make one, please come back and post your results!

Dave1442397

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Re: Replacing a leather watch strap?
« Reply #5 on: September 28, 2018, 05:43:37 AM »
The reason I'm asking the question here is that I haven't tried anything like it before, unless you count stitching up a hole in a t-shirt and other simple sewing skills like that, so I wasn't really sure if it's a thing that novices can do easily or not. :3

A leather watch band was actually the first leather craft I ever did back in my Boy Scout days. If they let us do it, it can't be that hard :)

wheezle

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Re: Replacing a leather watch strap?
« Reply #6 on: October 02, 2018, 02:10:24 PM »
If you use real top-grain leather (your old strap was apparently garbage), it'll last a long time. If you use a natural veg-tan leather, it will look awesome, especially as it ages.

Cutting leather isn't exactly easy, though, so that may be a challenge if you have random scraps lying around.

BookLoverL

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Re: Replacing a leather watch strap?
« Reply #7 on: October 02, 2018, 03:35:28 PM »
If you use real top-grain leather (your old strap was apparently garbage), it'll last a long time. If you use a natural veg-tan leather, it will look awesome, especially as it ages.

Cutting leather isn't exactly easy, though, so that may be a challenge if you have random scraps lying around.

It's definitely real leather that I have, but not sure what grain, so hopefully it'll go well. Thanks for the advice. :) The watch was given to me by my grandma second hand when the mechanism of my old one stopped working in any case.

My dad's got a whole workshop full of engineering-type tools including small sharp knives, so I'm sure I can work something out for cutting. Alas, I'm going to have to delay the project a bit though, because I'm going to be busy both days this weekend. But thanks everyone, I'm definitely going to try this as soon as I get a weekend where people are not making me go places. :)

wheezle

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Re: Replacing a leather watch strap?
« Reply #8 on: October 02, 2018, 08:03:26 PM »
My dad's got a whole workshop full of engineering-type tools including small sharp knives, so I'm sure I can work something out for cutting. Alas, I'm going to have to delay the project a bit though, because I'm going to be busy both days this weekend. But thanks everyone, I'm definitely going to try this as soon as I get a weekend where people are not making me go places. :)
Also, if you have a Dremel, you can burnish the edge once you're done, which will make the edges smooth and shiny, and darkened if you burnish it a lot. That's what'll make it look like a professional job.