Author Topic: Project - New kitchen!  (Read 29953 times)

couponvan

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #50 on: April 05, 2015, 09:58:41 AM »
It is really coming along! In pics, the black diamond tile you scraped the paint off to reveal actually looks ok in a retro kind of way.  In real life chipped paint/ugly grout might be an issue.

Daleth

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #51 on: April 05, 2015, 10:12:52 AM »
That looks awesome! Another place you can get cheap good-quality doors (and drawers) is at www.DrawerDepot.com. That's where we went when refacing my mom's kitchen. You have to take all measurements yourself, obviously, and they ship unpainted and unprimed (except you can get the drawer boxes put together and varnished). Saves a TON of money, everything was great quality and the customer service was great too.

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #52 on: April 05, 2015, 12:48:31 PM »
That looks awesome! Another place you can get cheap good-quality doors (and drawers) is at www.DrawerDepot.com. That's where we went when refacing my mom's kitchen. You have to take all measurements yourself, obviously, and they ship unpainted and unprimed (except you can get the drawer boxes put together and varnished). Saves a TON of money, everything was great quality and the customer service was great too.

I simulated the same measurements for my kitchen and it came out to be 1900 dollars...  I paid 300$ total... The cheapest I found other than the Amish was a company up in Canada and their quote was 600$ + hinges...  We paid  300$ hinges included....

I agree the kitchen is starting to come along. I think the most painful and time consuming tasks are now gone...  We are going to paint the walls now and replace bank splash...  I agree for a retro look it might have look good but they have too many imperfections and scraping the paint of is  a pain.

I did some math and relaxing back splash is going to cost around  60-80 bucks...

Will try to hit everything this week

Daleth

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #53 on: April 05, 2015, 02:26:33 PM »
That looks awesome! Another place you can get cheap good-quality doors (and drawers) is at www.DrawerDepot.com. That's where we went when refacing my mom's kitchen. You have to take all measurements yourself, obviously, and they ship unpainted and unprimed (except you can get the drawer boxes put together and varnished). Saves a TON of money, everything was great quality and the customer service was great too.

I simulated the same measurements for my kitchen and it came out to be 1900 dollars...  I paid 300$ total... The cheapest I found other than the Amish was a company up in Canada and their quote was 600$ + hinges...  We paid  300$ hinges included....

I agree the kitchen is starting to come along. I think the most painful and time consuming tasks are now gone...  We are going to paint the walls now and replace bank splash...  I agree for a retro look it might have look good but they have too many imperfections and scraping the paint of is  a pain.

I did some math and relaxing back splash is going to cost around  60-80 bucks...

Will try to hit everything this week

Goddamn! $300! Can you share the contact info for those Amish people? :)

HairyUpperLip

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #54 on: April 05, 2015, 05:38:15 PM »
wow great work !

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #55 on: April 05, 2015, 07:58:52 PM »
That looks awesome! Another place you can get cheap good-quality doors (and drawers) is at www.DrawerDepot.com. That's where we went when refacing my mom's kitchen. You have to take all measurements yourself, obviously, and they ship unpainted and unprimed (except you can get the drawer boxes put together and varnished). Saves a TON of money, everything was great quality and the customer service was great too.

I simulated the same measurements for my kitchen and it came out to be 1900 dollars...  I paid 300$ total... The cheapest I found other than the Amish was a company up in Canada and their quote was 600$ + hinges...  We paid  300$ hinges included....

I agree the kitchen is starting to come along. I think the most painful and time consuming tasks are now gone...  We are going to paint the walls now and replace bank splash...  I agree for a retro look it might have look good but they have too many imperfections and scraping the paint of is  a pain.

I did some math and relaxing back splash is going to cost around  60-80 bucks...

Will try to hit everything this week

Goddamn! $300! Can you share the contact info for those Amish people? :)

Being Amish... They dont have a phone :D everytime i needed something I had to drive there which was still a bit of a stretch. They are located in the country side of PA

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #56 on: April 21, 2015, 05:21:38 PM »
Ill be damned!

Never again I will tell you!

I bought a dishwasher last weekend and we didn't have any hookups! I thought maybe of tackling those myself ... but a friend said they had a contact for cheap and they were really good. Since I am totally newbie regarding this I thought - well it wont hurt to have someone more experienced do the hook ups since I didnt feel ready for such a job.

Anyhow they came today, and the job was less than stellar. Sure the hookups work and the electrical is fine but to me that is far from being good!

No attention to detail whatsoever, they had the electrical box just there in the middle instead of doing a better job and hiding it or at least far from eye sight...



Even the holes on the side panel are far from perfect! Why drill in the middle when you could do it in the corner?!?

One thing is for sure... if you want things done right you have to do it yourself in most cases!

I found this was super expensive! at 145 dollars for these hookups especially considering the job they have done! Now in the end I'll probably have to redo the connections just to have this done correctly!

For the price they charged I would have done it a way better job...!!

I dont know how these people don't take into consideration something so basic... or if its just me that I am too picky... I really dont consider to be picky. Sure, if something is done at least do it the right way in the regard that is possible.

Ill see this as a 150 dollar lesson... at least I saw him go around the electrical panel that I feel it's pretty easy now to do future electrical connections to the panel.

couponvan

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #57 on: April 21, 2015, 06:02:44 PM »
This opening looks strange to me, but I am not an expert - how are you going to get the dishwasher in there? I have only seen dishwashers go to the floor? In my foreclosure lake house the dishwasher is all the way across the kitchen from the sink....go figure!  It makes no sense at all to me, but as none of the other houses around even have a dishwasher I just load wet dishes on a tray as move them across.

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #58 on: April 21, 2015, 07:32:59 PM »
This opening looks strange to me, but I am not an expert - how are you going to get the dishwasher in there? I have only seen dishwashers go to the floor? In my foreclosure lake house the dishwasher is all the way across the kitchen from the sink....go figure!  It makes no sense at all to me, but as none of the other houses around even have a dishwasher I just load wet dishes on a tray as move them across.

that opening is under the sink... so it's the cabinet to the right where the dishwasher is supposed to go.

If you see other pictures of the kitchen where I have everything in one picture, youll see that there are two openings under the sink... the dishwasher is going to the left of the sink, so the cabinet right next to this one.

There had to be holes here because of the water hookups and the drain to hook up with the sink drain.

but in my opinion this looks rather bad.

We didn;t have any hookups we decided to "lose" this cabinet to the dishwasher and it made snese to be right next to the sink, not only because of the hookups but because of proximity.

Not only they didnt do an amazing job... they scratched my cabinet doors to the point where I have to do a new coat on them ... the soldering of the pipes I guess they didn't even think of putting a towel underneath or something in case it would drip! - of course it did drip so now i have dried up soldering on the shelf!!

Here is a zoomed out picture:

« Last Edit: April 21, 2015, 07:40:33 PM by MrSal »

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #59 on: April 21, 2015, 07:38:09 PM »
This is what should have been done in my opinion by someone with a little of grey matter!



The box could have been hidden from sight by just putting it higher up ....

The romex coming from the panel in the basement the hole could've been at the corner where it make less impact in the cabinet space and look less of an eye sore!

This doesn't even look it's up to code!

As far is my knowledge, electrical hookups that are done near water hookups or being banged up - such as a cabinet place - should have these type of protectors:

« Last Edit: April 21, 2015, 07:41:21 PM by MrSal »

couponvan

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #60 on: April 21, 2015, 07:50:23 PM »
That makes more sense- so you are going to lose the left cabinet.  The wiring does look off, but I am not an electrician. You're really making progress!

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #61 on: April 21, 2015, 07:53:47 PM »
That makes more sense- so you are going to lose the left cabinet.  The wiring does look off, but I am not an electrician. You're really making progress!

Im not an electrician either and I can tell you I would have done a 10 xs better job than what was done here!

You don't need an engineering degree .. just a little bit of common sense!

Its almost done though... just need to attach the hardware now, which took about 2-3 weeks to arrive and it will be done... oh and the dishwasher :)

As for losing the left cabinet... yes we are. We are going to have suspended cabinets on the other side just for extra storage. We will be having the IKEA Besta series on it most likely and do a floating type of bar/sitting breakfast kind of thing which will have more storage and will compensate for that.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2015, 07:55:24 PM by MrSal »

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #62 on: April 21, 2015, 07:57:33 PM »
We also had a bit of a obstacle where the Amish guy mis measured some of the doors.

They were about 1/4" too long so they had to go back in order to be able to close. So that put us back a while too!

Its coming along though!

soccerluvof4

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #63 on: April 24, 2015, 09:56:59 AM »
Its looking GREAT!

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #64 on: April 24, 2015, 12:14:44 PM »
Yesterday I put the new diswasher in!

It took me about 2 hours to use a reciprocate saw cut the shelving and the cabinets all the way to the floor.

It looks sweet!

Amazing how the dishwasher was SPOT ON! The width was only off by 1/16" !! everything looks super flush and neat and tidy just how I like it!


enigmaT120

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #65 on: April 24, 2015, 01:39:53 PM »
Looks good.  I would move that electrical outlet up on the side though, like somebody illustrated.  Eventually it will be in water where it is.  Something will spill under there or a faucet or pipe will leak. 

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #66 on: April 24, 2015, 01:50:49 PM »
Looks good.  I would move that electrical outlet up on the side though, like somebody illustrated.  Eventually it will be in water where it is.  Something will spill under there or a faucet or pipe will leak.

I was the one that illustrated that! This installation of the pipes was the dumb plumbing and electrical guys!

I'll have to get and extension or buy longer romex to do that all the way to the panel

HairyUpperLip

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #67 on: April 24, 2015, 07:37:59 PM »
good progress! keep it up!!

couponvan

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #68 on: April 25, 2015, 03:21:57 PM »
Nice work! I just drool when I see your cabinets!

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #69 on: April 25, 2015, 07:42:46 PM »
thanks!!

I actually just fucked up!! on one of the handles the moment i closed the cabinet I went like " WTFFFFFFFFFF!"

I measured 3 inches instead of 2.5 inches somehow so it looks pretty bad!!

10 seconds before I started tackling that door I though to myself "Wouldnt it be pretty bad if I screwed up on these? Glad I didn;t..."

These freaking rulers in inches instead of being in the metric system kill me!!

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #70 on: April 25, 2015, 10:27:06 PM »
Just for a taste....



Kitchen is almost done.

Handles in drawers arent done because the screws it came are not long enough. I went to a hardware store and asked for longer screws and even those werent enough and additionally the thread size doesnt seem to match.

I will have to go back and see if i can find the exact same screw that came from the manufacturer but longer... if not ill have to ask the manufacturer and it will probably take an additional week.

One thing i found out is that putting these handles - any handles with two screws - is apain in the ass. Any 1/16" wrong and it can mean that they are not leveled at ALL.

What Im doing is to drill the holes a bit looser so that i can adjust tiny bits at a time if needed but even then its hard to make it super level with the other handle to match and also the door.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2015, 10:29:15 PM by MrSal »

couponvan

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #71 on: April 26, 2015, 09:28:03 PM »
So nice!  I don't know if this will help you or not, but DH and I made a plastic template when we did our cabinet knobs. We got one perfect and then cut a piece of hard plastic to the edge of the cabinet - then on every other cabinet we used the template so the holes would be in the exact same spot. It worked great for us, and eliminated a lot of measuring and drilling.

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #72 on: April 26, 2015, 10:07:08 PM »
So nice!  I don't know if this will help you or not, but DH and I made a plastic template when we did our cabinet knobs. We got one perfect and then cut a piece of hard plastic to the edge of the cabinet - then on every other cabinet we used the template so the holes would be in the exact same spot. It worked great for us, and eliminated a lot of measuring and drilling.

Thats what I ended up doing!

My little gimmick:



Painters tape and block of wood behind the door so as not to splinter it...



And its pretty much done. This week we'll tackle the backsplash









I really like the glass panels

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #73 on: May 02, 2015, 05:47:37 PM »
Can anyone please help?

We took the tiles off today



And the adhesive from the previous application is still on.

My question is... is it okay to be like that or does it have to be smooth as ive read online? if it has to be smooth, can i just use a compound to cover this? ive tried removing and its prettyhard...

Also, what should I use thinset mortar aka mud or mastic instead? The guy at the warehouse store just gave me mastic but now ive read mastic isnt as good and is actually more expensive.

Mrkineticz

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #74 on: May 02, 2015, 06:14:07 PM »
try to take off the sticky adhesive. imagine the thinset needing a good surface to bond to . The reason why its preferred to have dry and smooth surface is to make the bond tighter.

Best answer take off the adhesive and keep it dry and clean before applying backsplash. thinset , mortar , premixed mortar will be good.. then you will need grout for the lines if you will have tiles that need grout.

imagine trying to grip a  metal pole that has adhesive glue on it. your hands are not making full contact to the metal so your hand will slide down by gravity. Dependent on how heavy your backsplash will be gravity will make it fall down eventually. it might take some time but making contact is important!

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #75 on: May 02, 2015, 06:30:26 PM »
that thing is impossible to remove though ... could i try and just apply drywall compound on top of it to make it smooth then?

as for the tiles they are not very big... like 2 inches by 4 inches.

kendallf

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #76 on: May 02, 2015, 07:22:01 PM »
If the remnants of the old mastic are at least as flat as the thickness you're going to spread the new mastic, it will probably work out OK.  Be warned though, it's harder to get a flat, aligned job over any irregularities, even small ones.  You would normally use a trowel with something like 1/8" notches for a fairly thin layer of mastic on small tiles such as you're using.  Try to flatten the old residue with this thickness in mind.

I'd stick with the mastic for that job.  Mastic is "stickier" and the tiles will stay on the wall where they're placed.  They'll slide with mortar and require spacers and support until dry.  The mastic works fine for areas that will not see water regularly.

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #77 on: May 02, 2015, 08:47:09 PM »
If the remnants of the old mastic are at least as flat as the thickness you're going to spread the new mastic, it will probably work out OK.  Be warned though, it's harder to get a flat, aligned job over any irregularities, even small ones.  You would normally use a trowel with something like 1/8" notches for a fairly thin layer of mastic on small tiles such as you're using.  Try to flatten the old residue with this thickness in mind.

I'd stick with the mastic for that job.  Mastic is "stickier" and the tiles will stay on the wall where they're placed.  They'll slide with mortar and require spacers and support until dry.  The mastic works fine for areas that will not see water regularly.

So maybe use compound in order to smooth out the surface?

kendallf

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #78 on: May 02, 2015, 08:59:54 PM »
If the remnants of the old mastic are at least as flat as the thickness you're going to spread the new mastic, it will probably work out OK.  Be warned though, it's harder to get a flat, aligned job over any irregularities, even small ones.  You would normally use a trowel with something like 1/8" notches for a fairly thin layer of mastic on small tiles such as you're using.  Try to flatten the old residue with this thickness in mind.

I'd stick with the mastic for that job.  Mastic is "stickier" and the tiles will stay on the wall where they're placed.  They'll slide with mortar and require spacers and support until dry.  The mastic works fine for areas that will not see water regularly.

So maybe use compound in order to smooth out the surface?

For a backsplash, that will probably work OK.  That's pretty much decorative tile only. 

Mrkineticz

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #79 on: May 03, 2015, 12:25:06 AM »
If the remnants of the old mastic are at least as flat as the thickness you're going to spread the new mastic, it will probably work out OK.  Be warned though, it's harder to get a flat, aligned job over any irregularities, even small ones.  You would normally use a trowel with something like 1/8" notches for a fairly thin layer of mastic on small tiles such as you're using.  Try to flatten the old residue with this thickness in mind.

I'd stick with the mastic for that job.  Mastic is "stickier" and the tiles will stay on the wall where they're placed.  They'll slide with mortar and require spacers and support until dry.  The mastic works fine for areas that will not see water regularly.


that works as well.

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #80 on: May 03, 2015, 03:02:45 PM »
So I decided to tear it down







But now i have a problem or something i dont know how to address.

On the corner of the wall and also by the framing of the window, the studs have steel mesh. It seems its from the drywall itself i cant tell.

But this makes it super hard to remove the drywall. How should I address this since the corner i need to drill in order to pass thru the wire for example, and also i want to have the drywall as close as possible once i have the new sheets up.



Also, the gaps how should i do it? just joint compound along with fiberglass tape?

kendallf

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #81 on: May 03, 2015, 07:41:11 PM »
Now that you've gone this far, just square up the cuts you've made and put concrete board back on as the tile backer (Durock, Hardieboard, or similar).  It looks like that might've been a plaster wall, which is done over wire lath attached to the studs.  The best cutting tool for the plaster and the wire lath is a diamond blade in a 4" angle grinder.  Wear some eye protection and get ready for a TON of dust, though.

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #82 on: May 03, 2015, 09:54:04 PM »
Now that you've gone this far, just square up the cuts you've made and put concrete board back on as the tile backer (Durock, Hardieboard, or similar).  It looks like that might've been a plaster wall, which is done over wire lath attached to the studs.  The best cutting tool for the plaster and the wire lath is a diamond blade in a 4" angle grinder.  Wear some eye protection and get ready for a TON of dust, though.

I don't think they're plaster. I mean they look like drywall and only the corner had this mesh protecting the stud it seems. Everywhere else other than the corner did not have that mesh... Also when cutting it seemed there was some kind of paper backing don't drywall have that?  Also the wall was secured with Nails onto the studs... If it were plaster would nails show up along the wall?

What do you mean by square up the cuts? I think they look pretty straight as of now except for that corner I referred.

Any reason why it should be Durock instead of just normal drywall?

Also what about the insulation should I replace it or leave it as is?

(I'll be wiring some romex now that is open in order to power under Cabinet lighting from the switch.)
« Last Edit: May 03, 2015, 10:26:00 PM by MrSal »

RunHappy

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #83 on: May 04, 2015, 08:10:02 AM »
It looks very nice!

Following this thread because SO and I are thinking about doing our kitchen ourselves. 

theoverlook

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #84 on: May 04, 2015, 09:35:18 AM »
The steel mesh might be left over from prior plaster walls, someone removed the plaster but not all the metal lath.  Maybe?  There is also plaster that is put up over thin drywall panels, that is how the original walls and ceilings in my current house were built.  So it was 1/4" drywall nailed to the studs with metal lath and plaster over that.

To cut the corner, I would use my oscillating multi-tool.  It chews up the blades to go through the metal lath but it does a great job.  An angle grinder would also work but as has been said prepare for a bunch of dust.  You do not need a diamond blade, a regular thin cut-off wheel works.  What tools do you have?

Cement tile backer is stronger and more dimensionally stable than drywall, it will make your tile work last longer and hold up better.  Drywall works if you already have it.

I wouldn't worry about your insulation since you aren't going to be doing the whole wall.


MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #85 on: May 04, 2015, 11:36:42 AM »
The steel mesh might be left over from prior plaster walls, someone removed the plaster but not all the metal lath.  Maybe?  There is also plaster that is put up over thin drywall panels, that is how the original walls and ceilings in my current house were built.  So it was 1/4" drywall nailed to the studs with metal lath and plaster over that.

To cut the corner, I would use my oscillating multi-tool.  It chews up the blades to go through the metal lath but it does a great job.  An angle grinder would also work but as has been said prepare for a bunch of dust.  You do not need a diamond blade, a regular thin cut-off wheel works.  What tools do you have?

Cement tile backer is stronger and more dimensionally stable than drywall, it will make your tile work last longer and hold up better.  Drywall works if you already have it.

I wouldn't worry about your insulation since you aren't going to be doing the whole wall.

I have a reciprocate saw, and portable hand saw ... I also have drills, compressor and so on... so far I have used the hand drywall saw to maneouver around the studs and the reciprocate saw to cut off the drywall section.

I also have a palm sander ...

Also if I get the cement backer... which tool would i need to cut it with?
« Last Edit: May 04, 2015, 11:38:46 AM by MrSal »

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #86 on: May 04, 2015, 10:14:22 PM »
I ended up using a cut plyer it it gave out pretty quickly!

I then went on and started wiring for the cabinets but ran out of wire so i need to go to the hardware store tomorrow after work to get more. I did reinsulate a bit because i took off the old one since it was in really bad shape.

Tomorrow is drywall time


MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #88 on: May 05, 2015, 08:49:24 PM »
A little update and a request for help.

Here are pictures as of late:






Can someone please help regarding a few doubts?

So I am doing the wiring but I dont like this approach as much.

I was given by the representative a #12 wire to make the connections. This wire is thick and not very maneauverable especially to make the corners under the cabinets.

My question is... couldn't I use a much thinner wire since this little path of electricity will just be for the lights? (LEDs) Like a #18 gauge or something.

The diagram is something like this (forgive me but I used paint...):



This is the idea as of now. Using one of the switches at the door and convert it to a 2 prong switch. Since the box there doesn't have much room for all these splices, I thought of just connecting it to another box and do the splices there and then each wire following to the respective destination cabinet.

I have a problem with all the wire being #12 since at the cabinet they are very thick and hard to maneouver and makes the wire very conspicuous when you are trying to hide as much as possible.

Couldn't I just use thinner wire from the electrical box to the destination like this:



In my opinion I dont see anything wrong since it would be just like a lamp where they have thinner wires. I dont intend to connect anything with big wattage in those wires nor would there be any possibility.

That its possible I know it is - the range hood for example has very thin wires connected to thicker gauge wire - my question is if this is okay according to code to have thinner gauge wire inside the walls?

Thanks

EDIT:

To give a better perspective here are real pictures:



« Last Edit: May 05, 2015, 08:52:51 PM by MrSal »

kendallf

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #89 on: May 05, 2015, 10:23:52 PM »
In general, the minimum gauge wire is determined by the amperage rating of that branch circuit, and if it's 15 amps (which is common) then #12 will probably be the minimum.  This applies to the entire branch circuit.   The National Electric Code (NEC) covers this in Article 210 where there are tables for circuit length and wire size by ampacity and maximum allowable voltage drop. 

Appliances can be UL listed and sold with smaller wire as they aren't permanent parts of your house wiring. 

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #90 on: May 05, 2015, 10:40:29 PM »
In general, the minimum gauge wire is determined by the amperage rating of that branch circuit, and if it's 15 amps (which is common) then #12 will probably be the minimum.  This applies to the entire branch circuit.   The National Electric Code (NEC) covers this in Article 210 where there are tables for circuit length and wire size by ampacity and maximum allowable voltage drop. 

Appliances can be UL listed and sold with smaller wire as they aren't permanent parts of your house wiring.

Hmm ok gotcha. Too bad!

It seems rather silly to have such thick gauge just for the LEDs... maybe ill try to position the electrical boxes the closed possible to the cabinet hole Ill be making and see if I could use the lamp wire and access the electricity from there instead of having those big wires hanging out of the cabinet and a big box underneath

Thanks for ur input!

sisto

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #91 on: May 07, 2015, 02:04:07 PM »
It's because it's based on the whole circuit. If you ran a separate circuit just for those LEDs you could have made it a much lower amperage and used the smaller gauge wire. Since you are taping into an existing circuit all wiring on it needs to be the rated correctly for the breaker running it. BTW-You are doing a great job for being new to this.

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #92 on: May 07, 2015, 03:37:32 PM »
It's because it's based on the whole circuit. If you ran a separate circuit just for those LEDs you could have made it a much lower amperage and used the smaller gauge wire. Since you are taping into an existing circuit all wiring on it needs to be the rated correctly for the breaker running it. BTW-You are doing a great job for being new to this.

Yes I understand.

But applicances and even lamps are "taping" into the circuit as well. Sure they are using plugs but they are also taping there or even dishwashers or range hoods when you hardwire them youre using probably #18 awg wire or so.

But I understand the premise that then, you couldn't have those thin wires run inside the walls... although with a conduit I would see no reason not to.

I ended up just drilling the holes in the cabinets and leaving the wire just there so i can then use them for the lights.

Thanks for the compliment! All new to this even electricity although the basics and fundamentals I know because i studied electricity in physics so its not so hard to understand the concepts when you read a little bit.

We are now putting up the drywall and going to joint compound everything tonight. Tomorrow will be tiling day.

Here's an updated picture of the kitchen btw ...


couponvan

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #93 on: May 08, 2015, 02:00:23 PM »
Aww - now I'm thinking about LED lights!  Wanna come to my lake/FIRE house mess and put in my electrical now that you've done such a good job on yours?  ;-)

Your renovations look fabulous.  I can't wait to see the final product.

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #94 on: May 09, 2015, 04:44:31 PM »
Before and after:





I used one of those bags quickset 45 minutes and let me tell ya... I was putting it fine... and then in one minute it was pretty much stone!! Holy shit!!!

Anyhow, finally we can do the tile!!

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #95 on: May 10, 2015, 05:36:02 PM »
almost almost




ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #96 on: May 11, 2015, 04:34:59 AM »
Looking good! Not sure why you didn't find a mosaic to make your life easier, but it looks like the spacing is going well.

I would use a good silicone caulk between the tile and the counter rather than grout. Grout is less flexible and will eventually crack. Caulk is probably what you were planning on doing anyways - but the first (bathroom) backsplash I did I grouted the gap, and now it's cracked.

MrSal

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #97 on: May 12, 2015, 09:29:54 PM »
almost done with the tile!!

Ill be done tomorrow for sure... i only have about 3 rows to go or so ... i wouldve kept workign by the wet saw is outside and it is already late for so much noise...

time to start researching on how to make concrete countertops!

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #98 on: May 13, 2015, 05:04:07 AM »
Wait, why are you doing countertops after backsplash? That seems like a bad idea. Plus, those countertops look pretty nice...

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Project - New kitchen!
« Reply #99 on: May 13, 2015, 07:12:13 AM »
I know I'm late to the party, but I wanted to clarify/correct some things about the electrical wiring question.

--The minimum gauge for a 20A circuit is 12 AWG.  For a 15A circuit, it's 14 AWG.
--Yes, according to code, you have to run the full-size wiring for the whole circuit.  So even though your LED lights will only be drawing a few dozen milliamps at most, you have to put in the 12 or 14 AWG wire.