Author Topic: My First Tile Project - Shower tile project  (Read 6926 times)

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
My First Tile Project - Shower tile project
« on: April 22, 2015, 08:51:14 AM »
We bought our house fall 2014, now looking to make some changes. This shower is a MESS. The pictures* were taken right after a good baking soda scrub, so it's clean as it gets (kind of embarrassing to post). I didn't want to bleach so that the problem areas would remain visible. The shower floor looks like it has been sloppily repaired several times. There is an overall lack of grout leaving deep grooves between many tiles in both the floor and walls.

Here are my thoughts:
(1) The base wall tiles need replacing.
(2) The rest of the walls would maybe be fine with just some re-grouting (how?), as there aren't cracked tiles above the base.
(3) The entire shower floor tile needs replacing, including the bent metal drain.

Also of note, the bathroom does have a vent but overall poor airflow.

I actually like this shower: It's size makes it quick to clean and easy to warm up. As soon as we moved in, we installed a more efficient shower head. It just needs some work at this point, and some updated tile** will make the thing quite pretty.

SO... Anyone have any advice on this? Am I on the right track? Anyone know any DIY books or websites that are specific to tile shower floors? Thanks in advance!

*Sorry for the poor picture quality. My very mustachian phone does not have a flash, so I did a quick-job lightening them up to make them at least somewhat visible.
**Maybe this? https://www.flooranddecor.com/backsplashes-decoratives/pompeii-mix-design-2-ceramic-mosaic-911103950.html


« Last Edit: September 04, 2015, 09:17:39 AM by iknowiyam »

Breck

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 18
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2015, 09:53:37 AM »
Recommend you start here:
http://floorelf.com/

We just did a shower with penny tile floor, 12x24 tile walls, and epoxy grout. I've never used regular grout, but I think the benefits of epoxy grout are definitely worth the extra effort. Went with the Redgard membrane method MMM outlined in his post on building a shower.

QajakBoy

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 33
  • Location: Virginia
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2015, 10:26:00 AM »
I'd be worried about the floor, that the cracks may be a sign that the underlying floor is no longer solid enough to support the floor tile without flexing. 

You may have trouble finding replacements for the cracked wall tiles.  Unfortunatley, the crack all the way along that wall may be another indication of a structural problem. 

I'd be tempted to rip it all out and make sure that the underlying structure is okay, and that would also let you update the tile and use Redguard or Kerdi for waterproofing.  I like Breck's suggestion of the floorelf website.

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2015, 10:35:26 AM »
Some good advice! Thank you!

I will look at Floor Elf. I am certainly tempted to rip out the whole thing. The previous owner(s) have already demonstrated their handyman capabilities, so I am not inclined to trust their work... reverse polarity plug, ungrounded plugs, poor roof work, some shady HVAC work, etc.

Nice tiles are plentiful on Craigslist here, so it shouldn't be too expensive to do the whole job. Glad we have a second bathroom!

Updates to come. :)
« Last Edit: April 22, 2015, 10:57:01 AM by iknowiyam »

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2015, 04:05:30 PM »
Shower still in shambles because I injured my shoulder shortly after my last post. I only got started again last week and have been distracted by yardwork, etc.

Spork

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5753
    • Spork In The Eye
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2015, 12:27:53 PM »

If you're thinking of replacement, let me offer one handy bit of advice.  I am not a builder (and this is going to contradict what a whole lot of builders do)... but every time I've seen tile failures, it (IMO) is at least partially attributable to the backer.  Under no circumstances should you use green board as a tile backer in a wet area.  It's meant for being damp proof -- but not water proof.  It will fail if it gets wet.

So if you tear it out, do yourself a favor and use a cement backer board.  (Of course, if you have structural settling, this won't matter... it's going to fail no matter what in that case.)

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3057
  • Location: Emmaus, PA
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2015, 02:15:13 PM »
When I had bathrooms professionally redone, they used greenboard for the regular walls and cement board all around the shower.

Spork

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5753
    • Spork In The Eye
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2015, 03:26:40 PM »
When I had bathrooms professionally redone, they used greenboard for the regular walls and cement board all around the shower.

That's what I've always done as well.  But I see lots of houses around here done with regular drywall in the bathroom and greenboard in bath/shower area.

Goldielocks

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6180
  • Location: BC
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #8 on: June 24, 2015, 11:21:20 PM »
Recommend you start here:
http://floorelf.com/

We just did a shower with penny tile floor, 12x24 tile walls, and epoxy grout. I've never used regular grout, but I think the benefits of epoxy grout are definitely worth the extra effort. Went with the Redgard membrane method MMM outlined in his post on building a shower.

+1000 on epoxy grout.  I installed it a couple of years ago and the result is fantastic to maintain.  zero mold / color / cleaning issues.
Just don't wash excess down your drain, and keep your working area / qty small as it cures pretty fast.

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #9 on: June 25, 2015, 09:53:46 AM »
Now that I am looking at what I see behind the tile and what everyone here is saying I am considering doing a full bathroom remodel. The layers behind the shower tile are nothing like what various internet people describe. It doesn't look wrong (?); it just looks like whoever did this back in 1970 was using old methods even for the time. The waterproofing layer looks and feels like black wax paper, and there is no tape or sealant where the seams are between pieces.

It is a very small bathroom, and the drywall has gotten soft, wallpaper probably from 1990's peeling away at all edges. If I used green board on the walls and backer board in the shower I think it would be up-to-date with the modern world of moisture control and last for a long time. This would be valuable since we just moved in last year.

Of course, this would turn this into  a 6+ month project for me since I work slowly and have never done any of this before. The only thing I have done before that would be required in this project is interior painting. I would consider having the drywall professionally removed due to asbestos. I could install the new stuff myself.

Has anyone ever done a full bathroom remodel? How long did it take you?

Spork

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5753
    • Spork In The Eye
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #10 on: June 25, 2015, 10:21:05 AM »

I've done a couple.

Like you describe yourself... I'm dreadfully slow.  I also have the issue of getting bored with projects, putting them down for a while, then picking them back up.

I think both the ones I've done were in the 3-6 month range.  But I always had a separate bath, so they were not "high priority".  I think if you really busted your ass and worked every night/weekend, it would be orders of magnitude faster.   I just tend to lolligag along.

Midwest

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1326
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #11 on: June 25, 2015, 10:54:18 AM »
Now that I am looking at what I see behind the tile and what everyone here is saying I am considering doing a full bathroom remodel. The layers behind the shower tile are nothing like what various internet people describe. It doesn't look wrong (?); it just looks like whoever did this back in 1970 was using old methods even for the time. The waterproofing layer looks and feels like black wax paper, and there is no tape or sealant where the seams are between pieces.

It is a very small bathroom, and the drywall has gotten soft, wallpaper probably from 1990's peeling away at all edges. If I used green board on the walls and backer board in the shower I think it would be up-to-date with the modern world of moisture control and last for a long time. This would be valuable since we just moved in last year.

Of course, this would turn this into  a 6+ month project for me since I work slowly and have never done any of this before. The only thing I have done before that would be required in this project is interior painting. I would consider having the drywall professionally removed due to asbestos. I could install the new stuff myself.

Has anyone ever done a full bathroom remodel? How long did it take you?

I've worked on several houses and never heard of anyone using a abestos company for drywall removal.  That doesn't mean you shouldn't or that it is legal in your area, but that's been my experience.

As far as time, are you moving plumbing?  That can be painful the first time through.

MW

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3057
  • Location: Emmaus, PA
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #12 on: June 25, 2015, 12:20:01 PM »
It took a few months when I was paying a guy to do it...but at least my studs weren't rotting away anymore.

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #13 on: June 25, 2015, 01:19:26 PM »
MW, I would not relocate the toilet or sink; but if I do new drywall both would be removed and replaced.

NathanP

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #14 on: June 25, 2015, 01:33:29 PM »
Now that I am looking at what I see behind the tile and what everyone here is saying I am considering doing a full bathroom remodel. The layers behind the shower tile are nothing like what various internet people describe. It doesn't look wrong (?); it just looks like whoever did this back in 1970 was using old methods even for the time. The waterproofing layer looks and feels like black wax paper, and there is no tape or sealant where the seams are between pieces.

It is a very small bathroom, and the drywall has gotten soft, wallpaper probably from 1990's peeling away at all edges. If I used green board on the walls and backer board in the shower I think it would be up-to-date with the modern world of moisture control and last for a long time. This would be valuable since we just moved in last year.

Of course, this would turn this into  a 6+ month project for me since I work slowly and have never done any of this before. The only thing I have done before that would be required in this project is interior painting. I would consider having the drywall professionally removed due to asbestos. I could install the new stuff myself.

Has anyone ever done a full bathroom remodel? How long did it take you?

Was it a "mud job" (google for pics and description)? Last year I removed the 1970's tile from the floor and bathtub surround of our main bathroom. Around our tub the tile installers had used the metal lathe and then approximately 2 inches of "mud" upon which they set the tile. There was no vapor barrier. On the one tub wall that was external and had fiberglass insulation there was some mold. I replaced the insulation and that eliminated the faint smell of mold that always lingered around that bathroom.

Dealing with the mud floor was a pain. Using a crowbar, I removed the tiles and as little of the "mud" as I could. I then used a floor leveler mix to fill the bit and chunks of the floor that stuck to the tiles. I then used a layer of Ditra to ensure that there would be no issues with floor tiles cracking.

As previously recommended, use a layer of RedGard painted on cement board when you replace the tiles.

Midwest

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1326
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #15 on: June 25, 2015, 01:36:08 PM »
MW, I would not relocate the toilet or sink; but if I do new drywall both would be removed and replaced.

Hanging drywall is the easy part (or can be easily hired out).  Sweating copper and putting PVC down is more difficult for the first timer.  Six months is a seriously long time though.  Take week off and knock it out.  It will probably take you 2, but you'll learn something.

MW

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #16 on: June 25, 2015, 01:45:04 PM »
Now that I am looking at what I see behind the tile and what everyone here is saying I am considering doing a full bathroom remodel. The layers behind the shower tile are nothing like what various internet people describe.
...

Has anyone ever done a full bathroom remodel? How long did it take you?

Was it a "mud job" (google for pics and description)? Last year I removed the 1970's tile from the floor and bathtub surround of our main bathroom. Around our tub the tile installers had used the metal lathe and then approximately 2 inches of "mud" upon which they set the tile. There was no vapor barrier. On the one tub wall that was external and had fiberglass insulation there was some mold. I replaced the insulation and that eliminated the faint smell of mold that always lingered around that bathroom.

Dealing with the mud floor was a pain. Using a crowbar, I removed the tiles and as little of the "mud" as I could. I then used a floor leveler mix to fill the bit and chunks of the floor that stuck to the tiles. I then used a layer of Ditra to ensure that there would be no issues with floor tiles cracking.

As previously recommended, use a layer of RedGard painted on cement board when you replace the tiles.

Yes, that is exactly what it is! You didn't replace the shower floor? Did you RedGard over the mud floor before tiling or did you determine that the bottom was water-proof as ever?

MW, what are you talking about with copper and PVC? Why would I need to change out the piping just to take it out and then put it back? Not doubting, just not a clue what you mean. Is there something bad about copper now?

Oh... did you think I meant to replace it with new? Sorry, that's not what I meant. Just put it back in place in front of new drywall.

Midwest

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1326
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #17 on: June 25, 2015, 02:06:29 PM »
Now that I am looking at what I see behind the tile and what everyone here is saying I am considering doing a full bathroom remodel. The layers behind the shower tile are nothing like what various internet people describe.
...

Has anyone ever done a full bathroom remodel? How long did it take you?

Was it a "mud job" (google for pics and description)? Last year I removed the 1970's tile from the floor and bathtub surround of our main bathroom. Around our tub the tile installers had used the metal lathe and then approximately 2 inches of "mud" upon which they set the tile. There was no vapor barrier. On the one tub wall that was external and had fiberglass insulation there was some mold. I replaced the insulation and that eliminated the faint smell of mold that always lingered around that bathroom.

Dealing with the mud floor was a pain. Using a crowbar, I removed the tiles and as little of the "mud" as I could. I then used a floor leveler mix to fill the bit and chunks of the floor that stuck to the tiles. I then used a layer of Ditra to ensure that there would be no issues with floor tiles cracking.

As previously recommended, use a layer of RedGard painted on cement board when you replace the tiles.

Yes, that is exactly what it is! You didn't replace the shower floor? Did you RedGard over the mud floor before tiling or did you determine that the bottom was water-proof as ever?

MW, what are you talking about with copper and PVC? Why would I need to change out the piping just to take it out and then put it back? Not doubting, just not a clue what you mean. Is there something bad about copper now?

Oh... did you think I meant to replace it with new? Sorry, that's not what I meant. Just put it back in place in front of new drywall.

In my bathrooms, I had to do some minor plumbing - Add shut-off's (copper), move drains (pvc), and/or replace glued in P-traps with removable ones (PVC).  If you don't need to do any of that, makes things easier.

If you are doing a tile shower (I've never done one), I would think you would need to replace the drain as part of the process.  Otherwise, you might not have to do anything.  Hard to know without looking at your bathroom.

First time was much harder than the 2nd.  What should have taken 20 minutes took 3 hours.

None of it is rocket science, but getting things right takes much longer when you are learning.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2015, 02:49:58 PM by Midwest »

NathanP

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #18 on: June 25, 2015, 02:39:55 PM »
Now that I am looking at what I see behind the tile and what everyone here is saying I am considering doing a full bathroom remodel. The layers behind the shower tile are nothing like what various internet people describe.
...

Has anyone ever done a full bathroom remodel? How long did it take you?

Was it a "mud job" (google for pics and description)? Last year I removed the 1970's tile from the floor and bathtub surround of our main bathroom. Around our tub the tile installers had used the metal lathe and then approximately 2 inches of "mud" upon which they set the tile. There was no vapor barrier. On the one tub wall that was external and had fiberglass insulation there was some mold. I replaced the insulation and that eliminated the faint smell of mold that always lingered around that bathroom.

Dealing with the mud floor was a pain. Using a crowbar, I removed the tiles and as little of the "mud" as I could. I then used a floor leveler mix to fill the bit and chunks of the floor that stuck to the tiles. I then used a layer of Ditra to ensure that there would be no issues with floor tiles cracking.

As previously recommended, use a layer of RedGard painted on cement board when you replace the tiles.

Yes, that is exactly what it is! You didn't replace the shower floor? Did you RedGard over the mud floor before tiling or did you determine that the bottom was water-proof as ever?

MW, what are you talking about with copper and PVC? Why would I need to change out the piping just to take it out and then put it back? Not doubting, just not a clue what you mean. Is there something bad about copper now?

Oh... did you think I meant to replace it with new? Sorry, that's not what I meant. Just put it back in place in front of new drywall.

I should have been more specific regarding the floor. This was the bathroom floor, not a shower floor. For a shower floor I would follow the MMM post regarding waterproofing. I think that he just used RedGard over the level cement floor.

For the walls, I replaced the extremely heavy and bulky lathe + "mud" with cement board covered by RedGard as the vapor barrier. The tiles can then be applied directly on top of that. Do be sure to use real mortar and not that pre-mixed mastic stuff.

Mirwen

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 160
  • Location: Las Vegas
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #19 on: June 25, 2015, 03:00:57 PM »
I'm just finishing up my second bathroom renovation.  I also highly recommend the tile elf.  That's where I found all the best information.  Roll on membrane over cement board is definitely the way to go.  I only used one bucket so it was just as cheap as layered membrane and much easier to install.  I just want to say that it's well worth the time to flatten the walls before you get started.  I used a combination of sanding studs and building up with construction adhesive to make the walls as flat as possible.  Tile elf has a description of this somewhere.  I was brave enough to use large format tile for my current project and it's turning out well because of the flat walls. 

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #20 on: June 30, 2015, 08:52:25 AM »
Whew, now at the very bottom of the first wall! Yes, one wall. I can't work for long each day due to yard/house work (have to save some strength for that), heat/humidity, and potential exhaustion of patience and body. I worked today until there was so much rubble on the floor that I could not get my footing to continue.

As I have progressed down the wall, things have gotten easier. It could be a learning curve or because more moisture on the lower half has weakened the mud. At the bottom 6" there was definitely a lot of moisture getting all the way through; the metal mesh backing is rusted and fragile.

Cleaning is slowing me down. Filling small moving boxes with rubble and tossing them in the garbage bin, I am picking up and moving more debris than I would have imagined.

NOTES about the picture: again, taken with crappy phone and adjusted once on the computer.
(1) Drywall to the left is very soft, that piece will be replaced even if the rest is not.
(2) Far left beam is not a structural beam and is perpendicular to the other beams. This has been VERY annoying because it is no good for leverage with the pry bar, just bends. Will replace this with a correctly placed beam or two.
(3) This picture was taken AFTER cleaning up a box full of rubble.

NathanP

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #21 on: June 30, 2015, 03:27:02 PM »
Whew, now at the very bottom of the first wall! Yes, one wall. I can't work for long each day due to yard/house work (have to save some strength for that), heat/humidity, and potential exhaustion of patience and body. I worked today until there was so much rubble on the floor that I could not get my footing to continue.

As I have progressed down the wall, things have gotten easier. It could be a learning curve or because more moisture on the lower half has weakened the mud. At the bottom 6" there was definitely a lot of moisture getting all the way through; the metal mesh backing is rusted and fragile.

Cleaning is slowing me down. Filling small moving boxes with rubble and tossing them in the garbage bin, I am picking up and moving more debris than I would have imagined.

NOTES about the picture: again, taken with crappy phone and adjusted once on the computer.
(1) Drywall to the left is very soft, that piece will be replaced even if the rest is not.
(2) Far left beam is not a structural beam and is perpendicular to the other beams. This has been VERY annoying because it is no good for leverage with the pry bar, just bends. Will replace this with a correctly placed beam or two.
(3) This picture was taken AFTER cleaning up a box full of rubble.

This picture brings back lots of bad memories for me. Our bathtub had the exact same (ugly) tile plus the lathe and mud. I used 5 gallon buckets to bring the debris to the garage where I dumped it into a large cardboard box. Each week, I would discretely fill our garbage bin with the debris until it was all gone.

One tip for you. Try clearing out the top six or so inches on the wall using your hammer chisel etc.. Then, get your hammer head or claw behind the lathe and then jerk the hammer out and away from the wall. This should cause the lathe to flex and separate from the studs..tile and all. Once I figured this out I was removing entire sheets of lathe/tile/mud. Some spots are stubborn, but use your hammer and attack from behind the lathe.

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #22 on: June 30, 2015, 03:54:15 PM »
NathanP, thank you. It is good to hear from someone who has actually struggled with this stuff! I was trying to pull the whole thing at once initially on the first wall, as I had read somewhere. It did not seem to work, although this first wall had (hopefully) the only wrong-way stud that I could not pry against, and I did't really know what was behind it. So, I didn't know which layer was the back layer.

Maybe I will try that again. I know it won't come off all at once because the mesh is layered in 3 sections, but at least I may get some bigger chunks down and feel like I am getting somewhere this year.

waffle

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 286
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #23 on: July 01, 2015, 07:50:33 AM »
If at first you don't succeed get a bigger hammer...

zolotiyeruki

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3047
  • Location: State: Denial
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #24 on: July 01, 2015, 12:49:07 PM »
One more vote for epoxy grout.  Yes, it's a lot more expensive, and yes, you have to be more careful when applying it, but we had a much better post-install experience with the epoxy than we did with traditional grout.

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #25 on: July 28, 2015, 02:20:04 PM »
No real news. Fast-forward past having a guest, going out of town, and so many other things. My goal is to have the tile fully ripped out by the end of August. Not installed new, just ripped out... this depends on a steady flow of smallish boxes for tile  and mud disposal, plus soundness of shoulders and back.

It hasn't been bad (well, maybe), just haven't been getting to it. I need to give myself a kick in the pants. I will say this: I see very little sledge hammer work in my future after this project. The pry bar is my friend, though!

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Getting started on shower floor
« Reply #26 on: September 04, 2015, 09:16:43 AM »
After some yardwork, a brief illness, and some procrastination very important business I have finally gotten serious with this. I have not met my goal of pulling all the mud/tile in August, but that's okay - I'm great! Why, you say? Why am I so happy about this project even though I didn't meet my goal? I just pulled out more square footage in 45 minutes than I was able to do before with all my previous work hours combined!

This is how:

(1) 36" crow bar is my new demolition pal. My slender, short pry bar is essential for making way in tiny spaces, but it just doesn't have the leverage for this job.

(2) Ready small boxes. If you don't have small boxes ready, you will never be able to move enough rubble out of the way to keep working. This necessary because while prying with the crow bar you really should have your feet on the ground and not on an unstable pile of debris.

The large back wall came off basically in three sections because the wire mesh was layered as such. This does not mean that lots of stuff didn't fall off in the process (hence the boxes), but ultimately it is much faster now that I know what to do and have a reasonable strategy.

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Shower tile project
« Reply #27 on: February 11, 2016, 09:34:57 AM »
Haha, I was serious in September. Then more life happened, including travel and starting a new job. I guess it really doesn't bother me to not have access to this shower, but still I want to get it done before me start having houseguests again, which is coming up... Attached are pics; I have a slightly better phone now. All walls are down. Half the tile pulled from the floor.

Plumber quoted me $650 just to alter the valve piping (to allow for a single hot/cold handle) and install a brass face. To be fair, brass is more expensive. $100-$400 for the brass shower pieces online. I am hoping to stick with brass because it matches everything else in the bathroom, including the shower curtain rod and the vent cover... not something I would have picked from scratch, but I'll roll with it.

iknowiyam

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 178
    • The Honest Yam
Re: My First Tile Project - Shower tile project
« Reply #28 on: March 09, 2016, 10:48:48 AM »
Still journaling about this. I know you DIY forum folks like results, but I don't have anything exciting. No more pictures for now. Also, I will try to post smaller pictures, so when they are viewed they can be seen without excessive scrolling.

I have removed all tile from the floors now as well as the first layer (of how many?) of Stuff Beneath the Floor Tile. I might be at a point where I can just pry up the under liner with the mud or whatever is left in there.

Two concerns:
(1) Damaging the drain pipe. (The drain itself will be replaced with a new Kerdi.)
(2) Damaging the bathroom floor tile outside the shower, which I am not planning on replacing right now.

Also, I might be at the point when it would be best to remove the old drain, now that there is a gap between the drain surface and the floor. I will have to look into how to remove it without damaging the 1970 drain pipe. As usual, advice is welcome and appreciated.