Author Topic: Instructables  (Read 8277 times)

Bakari

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Instructables
« on: February 29, 2012, 04:25:07 PM »
Because I have a friend who works for the company, I get talked into doing a complete write up of all of my major DIY projects, so instead of detailing them again here, you can see the original on instructables if you are interested:

Modding a 2 ton pick up to get up to 30mpg:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Vehicle-efficiency-upgrades/

Rain-water-fed self-watering vegetable garden (made of all salvaged materials):
http://www.instructables.com/id/Large-Self-Watering-Planter-made-from-recycled-mat/

Non-grid-tie solar photovoltic system:
http://www.instructables.com/id/NON-grid-intertie-independant-solar-photovoltic-/

And two others that are relevant to mustachianism, though not to DIY persay:
http://www.instructables.com/id/Not-your-average-save-energy-advice-use-less-en/
http://www.instructables.com/id/Buying-used-bikes-for-beginners/

Gerard

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Re: Instructables
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2012, 04:59:53 PM »
That was good stuff. Thanks for the link(s).

Daley

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Re: Instructables
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2012, 05:25:18 PM »
Bakari, dude... I had no idea you were the guy who did the non-grid-intertie Instructable!

I remember coming across that thing months ago while doing some research about energy efficient home construction as my parents currently live in a rotting trailer about to fall apart and are being eaten alive in upkeep costs and utilities, and I was trying to pitch some construction ideas to help reduce cost of living with a sheet metal barn/garage conversion. Some of your posted work challenged me to re-evaluate and change my thinking on approaching parts of energy usage in the home. The architect I had helping me and pitched some of the ideas to thought a couple of the tricks I stole from you were inspired. If my wife and I are ever in a position with a property to properly implement some of those ideas (as the parents don't care - sigh), they're going to happen and help save us money because of your work. Thank you.

Bakari

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Re: Instructables
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2012, 08:30:57 PM »
Yeah, I go by Jacob Aziza usally on the interwebs, but since there was actually a real Jacob at ERE, I decided to use my real name for the ER/FI world to avoid confusing anyone.   Anything you find by David Craig Hiser or Lenard Simp are really me too :P

Awesome that you found that, and also are here on MMM; small internet.

I am really glad I could help inspire someone.


Daley

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Re: Instructables
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2012, 10:39:22 AM »
small internet.

I am really glad I could help inspire someone.

It really is, sometimes.

I too am glad that I've been given the opportunity to thank you directly and in a more meaningful way than a random "thanks!" as a stranger elsewhere. Your shared knowledge has been greatly appreciated.

jdchmiel

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Re: Instructables
« Reply #5 on: March 07, 2012, 11:21:54 AM »
silly question, but why do you have so many names that you alias under?

velocistar237

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Re: Instructables
« Reply #6 on: March 07, 2012, 12:31:11 PM »
A while ago, I wondered if houses would eventually have two circuits, one DC for solar panels, and one AC for grid power. You are my hero.

I live on the first floor, and our roof is 30 feet above. Would there be any problem with a wire that long? Would I keep the batteries up above or down on the first floor?

Bakari

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Re: Instructables
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2012, 04:25:38 PM »
silly question, but why do you have so many names that you alias under?

I honestly don't know.
Jacob Aziza started as a practical joke on my friends in High School, when email was still pretty new.  "He" started sending everyone in our group of friends (including me) cryptic, and sometimes vaguely threatening, messages.  He claimed to be with the FBI, but no one believed it.  The creepy part was that he knew so much personal information about everyone.
Then one day one of my friends caught me writing a message from Jacob Aziza, and it turned out it was me all along :P

Bakari

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Re: Instructables
« Reply #8 on: March 07, 2012, 04:46:54 PM »
A while ago, I wondered if houses would eventually have two circuits, one DC for solar panels, and one AC for grid power. You are my hero.

I live on the first floor, and our roof is 30 feet above. Would there be any problem with a wire that long? Would I keep the batteries up above or down on the first floor?

At such low voltage, there is a lot of loss in the wires.  There further the power has to travel, the thicker the wires have to be in order to minimize resistance (which will waste voltage in the form of heat).  According to: http://www.solar-wind.co.uk/cable-sizing-DC-cables.html to go 30ft (9 meters) at up to 20 amps and 12v, you need AWG 7 wire, which is already fairly thick, but would still result in 5% power loss.  You would get better results with something even thicker.
Alternatively, you can run multiple thinner wires all in parallel with each other, for example 4 awg-10 for positive and 4 awg-10 for negative.

I would put the batteries on the first floor.  You are likely to draw more current from the batteries all at once (for example, when first starting many electric motors, it draws a surge current), while the panels basically trickle charge the batteries all day.  If the battery is closer to the load, the wires going from battery to load don't need to be as thick. 
Think of a car: the alternator wire is fairly thin, while the wire going to the starter is enormous.  Better to not have to have the super thick wire running 30ft.  It would get very expensive.

Plus, you wouldn't want to store batteries on the roof, as they should be temperature controlled - extreme heat and cold will both damage them - and it would be easier to monitor and maintain them if they are closer to home.