Author Topic: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?  (Read 1228 times)

Sjalabais

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Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« on: March 30, 2019, 06:54:43 AM »
The way I use my garage/workshop means I clutter every workspace with alarming regularity. Now I want to separate my woodworking from all the other stuff by building a rolling workbench. Found some wheels, but they are without brakes. So the question is: How to secure the thing while I'm working? I was thinking about some sort of lifting mechanism, but would be very happy if some of you creative souls want to share good, simple ideas.

Fishindude

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2019, 07:33:06 AM »
In my experience the locking wheels on tools like table saws don't hold position real good.   Would be simple to fabricate a threaded leg on each corner screws down and lift the bench up off it's wheels.   Then screw them back up to roll the bench around.

Greystache

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2019, 07:35:23 AM »
I built a rolling workbench that has wheels with brakes and in 15 years I have never used the brakes.  Once I got it loaded up with all my tools it was so heavy that it is pretty stable. Maybe yours will be much lighter.  Try using it without brakes and see if it is a problem.  If it is, I guess you could make some wheel chocks or just roll it up against a wall to keep it from rolling away from you. Or, go down to Harbor Freight and get some wheels with brakes for ten bucks. Building a lift system sounds like the most complicated and possibly the most expensive option available.

BudgetSlasher

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2019, 09:02:16 AM »
I have a delta table saw (similar to this one: https://www.lowes.com/pd/DELTA-10-in-Carbide-Tipped-Blade-13-Amp-Table-Saw/50081568)

It uses 3 wheels, when stationary no wheels touch the ground. When you want to move it one wheel is on locking foot pedal which lowers and the locks the wheel, this rotates the far legs of the table slightly and on-to the other 2 wheel. (if you click the link the image will make more sense).

The layout and shape of it is clearer in the parts diagram here: https://www.ereplacementparts.com/delta-36725-contractor-saw-parts-c-3275_3334_289921.html

Perhaps you could copy it out of plywood or adapt something similar with kidney shaped cam for the foot operated wheel.

Alternatively, I use one of these for my band saw:https://www.amazon.com/Adjustable-Mobile-HTC2000-Power-HTC/dp/B00002262M/ref=sr_1_1_sspa?crid=8K7UHW6W1U79&keywords=mobile+tool+base&qid=1553957219&s=gateway&sprefix=mobile+tool+%2Caps%2C180&sr=8-1-spons&psc=1. The two rear wheels are always on the ground, but the front wheel are only load bearing when the foot pedals are locked down. Perhaps you could find some wheels that function like that for your build . . . or just build your work bench on an adjustable mobile tool base.

My miter saw is on a Bosch gravity rise stand, which is more complicated (and expensive) but follows a similar principle of getting the wheels off the ground when stationary.

I only use basic wheel on self feeding tools like my planer, anything where I have to apply pressure or input, I find basic wheels (even locking) too unstable.

All of what I discussed above is good for frequent moving. If it is only occasional I like fishindude's idea. I would take some long lengths of threaded rod and attach a foot to them, them run them up inside of the workbench (probably using some t-nuts and bushings) Then I would fix a nut on the other end of the rod ( either loctite, welded or 2 nuts locked together and drill a whole through the top of the work bench. I'd use the hole to access the fixed nut to raise and lower the foot (you could make a handle, use a racket, or a socket on a drill/impact driver). That should lift/lower the cart on/off the wheels.

nereo

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2019, 09:57:31 AM »
I have a delta table saw (similar to this one: https://www.lowes.com/pd/DELTA-10-in-Carbide-Tipped-Blade-13-Amp-Table-Saw/50081568)

How do you like that saw?  I've had my eye on one for a while... want something more substantial than my jobsite saw.

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2019, 01:16:30 PM »
Get a couple blocks of 6x4 post, about as long (or slightly longer) than the bench is deep.  Lay them flat (on the 6x side) and slide them under the wheeled cart.  Then rotate them so they lift the bench off the wheels and now rest on the narrower (4x) side).

If you look up Matthias Wandel on youtube, he's done a number of projects like that.

BudgetSlasher

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2019, 06:13:02 PM »
I was at rockler today and these (https://www.rockler.com/rockler-workbench-caster-kit-4-pack) were sitting at checkout and I couldn't help but think they would do exactly what you were looking for. Though at the price ...

Sjalabais

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2019, 03:44:56 AM »
Thanks for all the good and thorough advice! For now, I will have a look at the laziest approach mentioned above: Build it and check if it works stable  enough without any mechanism. Then I'll be back looking for other solutions if it doesn't work. I'm not even sure yet if the wheels I found can carry this load, but it's just a bench and a work in progress now anyway. But buying wheels...the 80$ example above says it all. I'd rather pick up something old and almost fitting for free online then going for the perfect solution at such a price.

lthenderson

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2019, 10:56:20 AM »
Not sure why you don't just buy a set of locking casters? You can get them as cheap as $17 for a set of four off of Amazon that can support up to 600 lbs or go heavier and get ones for $28 that can hold up to 3 tons. Sure there are other ways to skin the cat but I don't think any of them as simple and easy as pushing the cart where you want easily and then touching the lock mechanism with the toe of your foot.

https://www.amazon.com/Swivel-Caster-Wheels-Locking-Polyurethane/dp/B06Y49D2J2

https://www.amazon.com/Swivel-Caster-Wheels-High-gauge-capacity/dp/B01KTVYJ3S

BDWW

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #9 on: April 02, 2019, 11:04:08 AM »
Not cheap but these are more stable than locking castors, because you it rests on the actual footing/legs rather than a wheel when not being moved.

https://www.amazon.com/POWERTEC-17000-Workbench-Caster-Pack/dp/B00SX3T2LO

J Boogie

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #10 on: April 02, 2019, 03:00:28 PM »
I was at rockler today and these (https://www.rockler.com/rockler-workbench-caster-kit-4-pack) were sitting at checkout and I couldn't help but think they would do exactly what you were looking for. Though at the price ...

Yes, this is the best option if you're doing unplugged hand tool operations at your bench (planing, chiseling, sawing, etc). They hold their value well and should be easy to craigslist if you ever find you don't need them.

BudgetSlasher

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2019, 05:34:38 PM »
I have a delta table saw (similar to this one: https://www.lowes.com/pd/DELTA-10-in-Carbide-Tipped-Blade-13-Amp-Table-Saw/50081568)

How do you like that saw?  I've had my eye on one for a while... want something more substantial than my jobsite saw.

When I was researching I was between this saw and a similar rigid, both had overall positive reviews, but the rigid has a few more negative.

I cannot say the saw was dead on accurate out of the box or even without modification. Besides normal table saw setup I have had to do the following. 1) Add washers to shim the fence level and prevent it from dragging on the table. 2) I had to lap the flange that goes with the nut and build a jig to even out the flange attached to the motor to remove distortion from the blade, and 3) I had to elongate some mounting holes in order to perfectly align the knife with the blade.

In addition I added a router table next to the table so I chose to reverse the sides the legs were installed on for easier access.

Finally after a couple years of use the stop block on the clamping lever for the knife wore down and had to be replaced.

I have kept it wired for 120v, so that I can use it anywhere in my shot, though it can be re-wired for 240v.

All that aside (and things I had read I might need to do before buying the saw) once was setup I have loved it . . . . at least after I scrapped the "blade" it came with. Its built 11 lower cabinets, 30 drawers, done most of our hardwood flooring, redone our pantry, and made various small projects. The only time it has struggled was when the knife got out of alignment and I asked it to cut through 2-1/2" walnut.

Honestly though I would have bought more saw if I could have fit it in my workspace and committed to keeping the saw stationary, as it is every tool in the shop has to be mobile.

If you have a specific question I will try and answer them, but before this the only table saw I had worked with is my FIL's comparably priced Bosch jobsite saw which has seen him through building his kitchen and cabinets from the ground up as well so I can't compare it to a more economy tool.
« Last Edit: April 02, 2019, 05:36:27 PM by BudgetSlasher »

lthenderson

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2019, 07:21:17 AM »
I have a delta table saw (similar to this one: https://www.lowes.com/pd/DELTA-10-in-Carbide-Tipped-Blade-13-Amp-Table-Saw/50081568)

How do you like that saw?  I've had my eye on one for a while... want something more substantial than my jobsite saw.

When I was researching I was between this saw and a similar rigid, both had overall positive reviews, but the rigid has a few more negative.

I cannot say the saw was dead on accurate out of the box or even without modification. Besides normal table saw setup I have had to do the following. 1) Add washers to shim the fence level and prevent it from dragging on the table. 2) I had to lap the flange that goes with the nut and build a jig to even out the flange attached to the motor to remove distortion from the blade, and 3) I had to elongate some mounting holes in order to perfectly align the knife with the blade.

In addition I added a router table next to the table so I chose to reverse the sides the legs were installed on for easier access.

Finally after a couple years of use the stop block on the clamping lever for the knife wore down and had to be replaced.

I have kept it wired for 120v, so that I can use it anywhere in my shot, though it can be re-wired for 240v.

All that aside (and things I had read I might need to do before buying the saw) once was setup I have loved it . . . . at least after I scrapped the "blade" it came with. Its built 11 lower cabinets, 30 drawers, done most of our hardwood flooring, redone our pantry, and made various small projects. The only time it has struggled was when the knife got out of alignment and I asked it to cut through 2-1/2" walnut.

Honestly though I would have bought more saw if I could have fit it in my workspace and committed to keeping the saw stationary, as it is every tool in the shop has to be mobile.

If you have a specific question I will try and answer them, but before this the only table saw I had worked with is my FIL's comparably priced Bosch jobsite saw which has seen him through building his kitchen and cabinets from the ground up as well so I can't compare it to a more economy tool.

I think I found the best of both worlds when it comes to table saws. Someone clued me in to Rigid's hybrid table saw. It is much closer to a cabinet style table saw but has casters that I can use to raise it up and push it to the side of my garage when not in use. Out of the box, I had only to add a shim to true up the blade throughout its range of motion and put on my better blade. Other than that, it has worked out really well. I really like the large heavy top on it which has really helped out with my furniture making. I got my directly through Home Depot during some sales so it wasn't much more expensive than the table saw linked above.

https://www.amazon.com/RIDGID-R4512-13-Amp-Cast-IronTable/dp/B0090LHEJA

neo von retorch

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2019, 08:34:25 PM »
Ha, I just built a mobile miter saw cart. I made it so it lines up with the top of my workbench, which is SUPER stable, as it rests on 4x4 legs and is anchored to studs in the wall. The miter saw doesn't need to be nearly as stable, but it's on locking casters... and it still wiggles a little when trying to use the saw, and I want it to be very stable for accurate cuts (and safety.) I google'd the problem, and this was one of the results near the top! And it's recent. Neat. I think I will end up removing the casters and screwing some more wood to the bottom, and adding these fancy expensive lift ones. At some point. I would like something more immediate and inexpensive to just keep the cart in place - maybe I can uh, screw a locking hinge type thing to the workbench and snap it into place. But I'd probably have to have it latch in like 3-4 places to start to make the cart really immobile. I thought maybe putting blocks down to keep the wheels from wiggling would help, too. But I don't know...

dcozad999

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #14 on: May 10, 2019, 08:46:50 AM »
Not cheap but these are more stable than locking castors, because you it rests on the actual footing/legs rather than a wheel when not being moved.

https://www.amazon.com/POWERTEC-17000-Workbench-Caster-Pack/dp/B00SX3T2LO


These are what I put on the workbench I built a couple of years ago and they are excellent.  You barely need to push it to move it around, even when loaded with a couple hundred pounds.

Car Jack

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2019, 11:17:13 AM »
If it's heavy, build something like the casters for 4 poster lifts.  With those, the caster hooks into prongs on the posts.  Lowering the lift raises up the posts and the entire lift.  Something like that built with wood could do it.

https://www.bestbuyautoequipment.com/fp9k-dx-xlt-car-storage-parking-service-9k-lift-p/AutoLift-Car-Park-9.htm?gclid=CjwKCAjwwtTmBRBqEiwA-b6c_1sYavgF343LWoFHCZoogk7ngMxlc6bZFxYmvG3kQz8mU3oBeuP-dRoCi9oQAvD_BwE

for example of what it looks like for the lift

DeniseNJ

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Re: Ideas to stabilize a rolling woodworking bench?
« Reply #16 on: May 13, 2019, 12:41:49 PM »
Ha, I just built a mobile miter saw cart. I made it so it lines up with the top of my workbench, which is SUPER stable, as it rests on 4x4 legs and is anchored to studs in the wall. The miter saw doesn't need to be nearly as stable, but it's on locking casters... and it still wiggles a little when trying to use the saw, and I want it to be very stable for accurate cuts (and safety.) I google'd the problem, and this was one of the results near the top! And it's recent. Neat. I think I will end up removing the casters and screwing some more wood to the bottom, and adding these fancy expensive lift ones. At some point. I would like something more immediate and inexpensive to just keep the cart in place - maybe I can uh, screw a locking hinge type thing to the workbench and snap it into place. But I'd probably have to have it latch in like 3-4 places to start to make the cart really immobile. I thought maybe putting blocks down to keep the wheels from wiggling would help, too. But I don't know...

Can you tie or screw it to the stable work bench?  Like even with one of those rachet tie done rope/belt things.  Like if I was planning on fixing it in a couple of weeks but needed it today I would screw it to the stable surface or tie it tight.