Author Topic: How to learn "The Code?"  (Read 892 times)

Jon Bon

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 122
  • Location: Midwest
How to learn "The Code?"
« on: February 24, 2017, 12:06:25 PM »
TL;DR version I want to build a garage myself, and am worried about inspectors making my life hell.

Spring is in the air and I have been without a place to park my cars for long enough. The plan is to have a small detached garage with workshop above built in the back yard. This is very common in my area and I have the space to do it. I could just hire the whole job out, but where is the fun in that?!

I was planning on hiring some sort of architect/draftsman to get my initial plans and then also hire out the foundation work. So that leaves me mainly with the framing, roofing, siding and electrical. I figured having the pros on my side in terms of footprint and foundation would be the best way to insure I am in compliance with code day one. I am confident that I could in fact build this garage and it would stand up to the elements for a long time, but i'm not sure if it would be "to code".

So my question to the community is how do I learn framing and electrical code? This is going to be a simple job, I don't want to spend 400 hours in study so I can become a master electrician or carpenter, everything is going to be pretty dang basic.  I would appreciate any thoughts on how to approach this.




paddedhat

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1539
Re: How to learn "The Code?"
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2017, 01:47:48 PM »
The answer is the "code check" series of books. They rock. They are inexpensive, available on Amazon, and are the way to go for quick, easily absorbable information. Just figure out what version of the code your local authority is using, which is typically going to be determined by what year they are working on, like the 2009 or 2012 IRC, or whatever set of rules. Then get the code check building, and electrical, and you are good to go. I guarantee you won't regret the purchase.

Not only are they reliable and easy to understand, they are often considered the bible by inspectors out in the field. More than once, while discussing a point, I have had an inspector ask if I took a look at what Code Check had to say on the issue.

BudgetSlasher

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 285
Re: How to learn "The Code?"
« Reply #2 on: February 25, 2017, 09:03:31 AM »
The answer is the "code check" series of books. They rock. They are inexpensive, available on Amazon, and are the way to go for quick, easily absorbable information. Just figure out what version of the code your local authority is using, which is typically going to be determined by what year they are working on, like the 2009 or 2012 IRC, or whatever set of rules. Then get the code check building, and electrical, and you are good to go. I guarantee you won't regret the purchase.

Not only are they reliable and easy to understand, they are often considered the bible by inspectors out in the field. More than once, while discussing a point, I have had an inspector ask if I took a look at what Code Check had to say on the issue.

That is exactly what I was going to recommend, I keep one for each area (electrical, plumbing, and so on) with its corresponding toolbox.

ncornilsen

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 573
Re: How to learn "The Code?"
« Reply #3 on: February 28, 2017, 07:46:41 AM »
You can read them for free online for oregon... the 'oregon residential code' is basically the 2009 IRC with a few oregon-specific adders. (like the drainage plane requirement behind siding.)

May make for good reference material if your state doesn't publish he codes.