Author Topic: Garage Shelving  (Read 2539 times)

dcozad999

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 374
  • Location: Topeka, KS
Garage Shelving
« on: May 09, 2017, 12:05:43 PM »
Moving in a few weeks and am just preparing my summer to do list.  The garage will need some shelving and I've so far convinced myself to DIY some 2 x 4 shelving. I figure this is the best bet for getting the exact dimensions for current storage needs.

Plan on using a framing nailer I bought for a previous project rather than screws.

Most plans seem to use OSB or plywood for the actual shelf. Is there something stronger that can take more weight.

Anybody have a better ideas/alternatives?  Or potential issues with using nails rather than screws (besides ease of taking them apart.

I'm a novice DIYer so any advice I get can be helpful.

Jon Bon

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 205
  • Location: Midwest
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2017, 12:14:36 PM »
2x4s and plywood is a great way to make some awesome shelves. I have installed these at every house I live in. I have the big box store rip the plywood into 16 inch sheets, so you get 3 shelves per sheet of plywood. Then I just put it all together with my nailgun. You can also buy a pack of 2x2s to use in places to save a few bucks and gain a few inches depending on design.

What um, are you planning on putting on these? 2x4s and plywood is very strong, just think its what your entire house is built on. If you want stronger just add more 2x4s.


lthenderson

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 878
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2017, 12:16:12 PM »
I have redone three different garages, the first two like what you describe and the third (and current one) I went a different track. The problem I had with 2 x 4 shelving is that it takes up so much space for the weight required. For every shelf assuming you use 1/2" plywood, you lose 4" of vertical height if you count the depth of the 2 x 4 and plywood. By the time you have five or six shelves, you've lost 24" of space. That's quite a bit. Instead, I have bought cheap metal shelving units at the big box hardware stores and assembly them except I replace their cheap chipboard shelves with actual stranded plywood which can hold a lot more weight without bowing. I generally screw them to the wall which strengthens the entire thing and allows you to put more weight on them. Another option is to use metal shelf brackets and string them in a straight line before topping with stranded plywood that you rip to size. This probably takes up the least amount of vertical depth. This last garage, I also replaced a significant amount of shelving with cabinets made for the garage that can also be purchased at big box hardware stores. This keeps the contents dust free and organized better and I have found to be worth every penny.

dcozad999

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 374
  • Location: Topeka, KS
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2017, 12:18:38 PM »
2x4s and plywood is a great way to make some awesome shelves. I have installed these at every house I live in. I have the big box store rip the plywood into 16 inch sheets, so you get 3 shelves per sheet of plywood. Then I just put it all together with my nailgun. You can also buy a pack of 2x2s to use in places to save a few bucks and gain a few inches depending on design.

What um, are you planning on putting on these? 2x4s and plywood is very strong, just think its what your entire house is built on. If you want stronger just add more 2x4s.


I guess I was thinking more of the shitty mdf they give you with the store bought ones.  1/2 inch plywood should be plenty strong.

I'm kind of thinking of using this one as a guide:   http://diy.blogoverflow.com/2013/03/how-to-build-sturdy-garage-shelves/

Jon Bon

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 205
  • Location: Midwest
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2017, 12:26:33 PM »
Yeah that link looks legit.

Henderson does make a good point.  using 2x4s as your horizontal joists does take a fair amount of room. Depending on your plan you can us a 2x2 you just have to run bracing every 24-48 inches.  It is a trade-off, but I usually prefer to uses 2x2s for this reason. I am not stacking bricks up there so 2x4s is a bit of overkill and wastes space.

dcozad999

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 374
  • Location: Topeka, KS
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2017, 12:39:48 PM »
The guy in the link used 2x3's for the horizontal joists on the wall.

lthenderson

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 878
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #6 on: May 09, 2017, 12:50:08 PM »
This is one of the ideas I was referring too. Much, much cheaper and easier.

http://www.practicaldiy.com/carpentry/shelving/shelf_bracket_fitting_2.php

Jon Bon

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 205
  • Location: Midwest
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #7 on: May 09, 2017, 12:50:54 PM »
Ones on the back wall do not really matter, very rarely is that part of the shelf used. What you are doing with a 2x4 is having 3.5 inches of the front of the shelf that is basically blocked from your use. Sure you can maneuver stuff under it, but it can give you a lip that blocks your from storing stuff. Sorry if im being repetitive here.


sequoia

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 288
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #8 on: May 09, 2017, 12:54:56 PM »
I made a few shelvings with 2x4. But then I remove all of those and replace them with a store shelving that I bought from a store that went bankrupt. I got them cheap. I got lucky and just happened to be at the right place and the right time. Mine is similar to what is in the link below, 8ft high. Both side of the garage is lined with these. They happened to fit perfectly for us. These ended up cheaper than my DIY with 2x4.

The great thing about it is it is easily adjustable, so I can maximize the height between shelvings. These also very strong, with metal shelves.

http://www.buystorefixtures.com/pages/store/skudetail.nhtml?profile=gondolashelving&uid=11435&returnURL=http%3A//www.buystorefixtures.com/gondolashelving

I see this type of shelvings pop-up every so often at CL.
« Last Edit: May 09, 2017, 12:56:44 PM by sequoia »

nereo

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6303
  • Location: la belle province
    • Here's how you can support science today:
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #9 on: May 09, 2017, 02:02:07 PM »
First - check out this plan as an idea:
http://www.ana-white.com/2016/01/free_plans/easy-and-fast-diy-garage-or-basement-shelving-tote-storage
Super easy, very fast and wicked strong.  Oh, and dirt cheap to build - ~$50 for all the materials.

To address your questions - both plywood and OSB (of appropriate thickness) are plenty strong as support.  What matters is how they are supported - there's no reason you can't support 300+ lbs. per shelf-span.  If you really need more just add more bracing and make the legs closer together (4' instead of 8' apart)

hope that helps...
"Do not confuse complexity with superiority"

neo von retorch

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2550
  • Location: SE PA
    • Fi@retorch - personal finance tracking
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #10 on: May 09, 2017, 02:12:54 PM »
Following - so far I've bought cheap (thick) plastic shelves, which work OK but I would like to greatly increase the utility of the wall space with shelves like these. The two links with plans are helpful!

SustainableStache

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 20
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #11 on: May 09, 2017, 02:27:08 PM »
First - check out this plan as an idea:
http://www.ana-white.com/2016/01/free_plans/easy-and-fast-diy-garage-or-basement-shelving-tote-storage
Super easy, very fast and wicked strong.  Oh, and dirt cheap to build - ~$50 for all the materials.

To address your questions - both plywood and OSB (of appropriate thickness) are plenty strong as support.  What matters is how they are supported - there's no reason you can't support 300+ lbs. per shelf-span.  If you really need more just add more bracing and make the legs closer together (4' instead of 8' apart)

hope that helps...

I made that exact shelf in my basement and I love it. It was cheap and easy, it's strong, and it looks pretty good. I hung a curtain so all the shit isn't on "display". One row of shelves is for our Costco backstock, another for camping gear and other sports equipment, and the bottom shelf has a chest freezer on wheels plus a wheeling tool chest. I love it.

dcozad999

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 374
  • Location: Topeka, KS
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #12 on: May 09, 2017, 02:53:39 PM »
First - check out this plan as an idea:
http://www.ana-white.com/2016/01/free_plans/easy-and-fast-diy-garage-or-basement-shelving-tote-storage
Super easy, very fast and wicked strong.  Oh, and dirt cheap to build - ~$50 for all the materials.

To address your questions - both plywood and OSB (of appropriate thickness) are plenty strong as support.  What matters is how they are supported - there's no reason you can't support 300+ lbs. per shelf-span.  If you really need more just add more bracing and make the legs closer together (4' instead of 8' apart)

hope that helps...

I made that exact shelf in my basement and I love it. It was cheap and easy, it's strong, and it looks pretty good. I hung a curtain so all the shit isn't on "display". One row of shelves is for our Costco backstock, another for camping gear and other sports equipment, and the bottom shelf has a chest freezer on wheels plus a wheeling tool chest. I love it.


I like it, but something in my mind finds it aesthetically unappealing.  I think it's the lack of symmetry with vertical 2 x 4s in the front and not the back.

That said, it would be cheaper and I may switch to that plan.

Anyone see an issue with using a framing nailer on these plans instead of screws? I like using my framing nailer, lol

nereo

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6303
  • Location: la belle province
    • Here's how you can support science today:
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #13 on: May 09, 2017, 03:02:18 PM »
First - check out this plan as an idea:
http://www.ana-white.com/2016/01/free_plans/easy-and-fast-diy-garage-or-basement-shelving-tote-storage
Super easy, very fast and wicked strong.  Oh, and dirt cheap to build - ~$50 for all the materials.

To address your questions - both plywood and OSB (of appropriate thickness) are plenty strong as support.  What matters is how they are supported - there's no reason you can't support 300+ lbs. per shelf-span.  If you really need more just add more bracing and make the legs closer together (4' instead of 8' apart)

hope that helps...

I made that exact shelf in my basement and I love it. It was cheap and easy, it's strong, and it looks pretty good. I hung a curtain so all the shit isn't on "display". One row of shelves is for our Costco backstock, another for camping gear and other sports equipment, and the bottom shelf has a chest freezer on wheels plus a wheeling tool chest. I love it.


I like it, but something in my mind finds it aesthetically unappealing.  I think it's the lack of symmetry with vertical 2 x 4s in the front and not the back.

That said, it would be cheaper and I may switch to that plan.

Anyone see an issue with using a framing nailer on these plans instead of screws? I like using my framing nailer, lol
I don't see why a framing nailer wouldn't work fine for your purposes.
As for the plan, if the aesthetics really bug you, you could put 'dummy-legs' in the back without a problem.  Another person suggested tacking curtain material up so that your 'stuff' is hidden.
My parents had something very similar and as kids we painted it with leftover paint... it was fun and made it look a bit quirky. 
Ultimately it's going to be covered in stuff and in your garage,
"Do not confuse complexity with superiority"

bacchi

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2003
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #14 on: May 09, 2017, 03:13:11 PM »
You could also notch the plywood, making it all flush.

Scortius

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 277
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2017, 10:46:56 AM »
We're going through the process of buying a house, and one of the things we were pleasantly surprised to find was an amazing shelving system in the garage. It makes such a huge difference!

The part I was most impressed with was that the current owners had installed ceiling 'rails' where they could slide in large Rubbermaid-style bins and keep them out of the way.  They use them to store items they don't frequently access, like seasonal clothing, outdoor gear, and holiday decorations.  It's such a simple design but it adds a ton of extra space!

Quick Google: https://www.familyhandyman.com/garage/storage/create-a-sliding-storage-system-on-the-garage-ceiling/view-all

nereo

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6303
  • Location: la belle province
    • Here's how you can support science today:
"Do not confuse complexity with superiority"

paddedhat

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #17 on: May 12, 2017, 06:18:36 AM »
First, the vast majority of DIY shelving is grossly overbuilt. I discovered this when I started working for a large stair and mllwork  shop. The  entire second floor of the production facility, about 6000 sq. ft. was covered in site built shelving. It was all custom sized to accommodate  specific items and many shelves were loaded with a lot of weight, such as stacks of  hundreds of pounds of Closet Maid wire shelving.  The only material used was 1/4" luan plywood,  1x3 furring strips,  small scrap wood blocks used as glue blocks,  1/4" x 1-1/4" air staples and yellow wood glue.  Since that time I have outfitted a garage and a barn for personal use, using the same lightweight techniques. These things look like every 2x4 and 1/2" plywood shelf built, but all the material is downsized. As a result you can hook an empty 16" deep x 8' long x  6' tall shelf unit on your shoulder, and carry it around with ease. The 16" depth is important too, as it allows for three rips from a sheet of ply, and is plenty deep.

I did something completely different a few months ago, when it was time to outfit the home we just bought. I headed to the big box store to grab all the usual material to build the same shelves I had built for decades. I then noticed something that I didn't anticipate. In the few years since I FIREd, lumber prices have shot through the roof, and my typical cheap shelving project was anything but. I decided to run the numbers and found that I could buy heavy duty chromed wire "Restaurant" shelving units for 30% more than the pile of lumber needed to build the shelves. As a result I have several units similar to the ones in the posted link,  in my garage, and couldn't be happier. I put casters under all of them, so I can easily roll everything out into the driveway if I need to clean behind them. They totally blow DIY shelving away, and can be reused, relocated and even resold if no longer needed.  When I priced different units on Amazon they can out to roughly $20-30 more than a pile of material needed to build a similar one. Once labor is factored in, I would actually loose money to end up with an inferior product.

https://www.amazon.com/TRINITY-EcoStorage-5-Tier-Shelving-72-Inch/dp/B00DSXQL1S/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1494590545&sr=8-5&keywords=nsf+wire+shelving

nereo

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6303
  • Location: la belle province
    • Here's how you can support science today:
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #18 on: May 12, 2017, 07:29:30 AM »
I did something completely different a few months ago, when it was time to outfit the home we just bought. I headed to the big box store to grab all the usual material to build the same shelves I had built for decades. I then noticed something that I didn't anticipate. In the few years since I FIREd, lumber prices have shot through the roof, and my typical cheap shelving project was anything but. I decided to run the numbers and found that I could buy heavy duty chromed wire "Restaurant" shelving units for 30% more than the pile of lumber needed to build the shelves. ...
Interesting, and a lesson that local prices really matter. I've  heard lumber prices have spiked in the US but I still live in saw-happy Quebec where they dump lumber from trees cut off provincial land. Last I checked an 8' 2x4 was $1.47CAD at my local yard, and a 1/2" sheet of OSB ran under $15.

Those wire-rack restaurant shelves are awesome. Ironically here they cost a fair bit more than what you can order, and lumber is less, so 'built with what you can get' I suppose...
"Do not confuse complexity with superiority"

paddedhat

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #19 on: May 12, 2017, 07:54:27 AM »
I did something completely different a few months ago, when it was time to outfit the home we just bought. I headed to the big box store to grab all the usual material to build the same shelves I had built for decades. I then noticed something that I didn't anticipate. In the few years since I FIREd, lumber prices have shot through the roof, and my typical cheap shelving project was anything but. I decided to run the numbers and found that I could buy heavy duty chromed wire "Restaurant" shelving units for 30% more than the pile of lumber needed to build the shelves. ...
Interesting, and a lesson that local prices really matter. I've  heard lumber prices have spiked in the US but I still live in saw-happy Quebec where they dump lumber from trees cut off provincial land. Last I checked an 8' 2x4 was $1.47CAD at my local yard, and a 1/2" sheet of OSB ran under $15.

Those wire-rack restaurant shelves are awesome. Ironically here they cost a fair bit more than what you can order, and lumber is less, so 'built with what you can get' I suppose...

Currently at lowe's in PA.

 7/16 OSB (1/2" not stocked)  $13.95 USD or 19.15 CAD   
 2X4X8'   $3.15 USD  or  $4.25 CAD
Decent 8'  1x3 is over $4

It wasn't all that long ago that 7/16 OSB was going for eight bucks and 2x4s were under two.  But, now that Forrest Trump had reignited the great Canadian dimensional lumber trade war, I'm sure prices will be stupid high for a while.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2017, 08:07:32 AM by paddedhat »

nereo

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6303
  • Location: la belle province
    • Here's how you can support science today:
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2017, 08:07:09 AM »
I did something completely different a few months ago, when it was time to outfit the home we just bought. I headed to the big box store to grab all the usual material to build the same shelves I had built for decades. I then noticed something that I didn't anticipate. In the few years since I FIREd, lumber prices have shot through the roof, and my typical cheap shelving project was anything but. I decided to run the numbers and found that I could buy heavy duty chromed wire "Restaurant" shelving units for 30% more than the pile of lumber needed to build the shelves. ...
Interesting, and a lesson that local prices really matter. I've  heard lumber prices have spiked in the US but I still live in saw-happy Quebec where they dump lumber from trees cut off provincial land. Last I checked an 8' 2x4 was $1.47CAD at my local yard, and a 1/2" sheet of OSB ran under $15.

Those wire-rack restaurant shelves are awesome. Ironically here they cost a fair bit more than what you can order, and lumber is less, so 'built with what you can get' I suppose...

Currently at lowe's in PA.

 7/16 OSB (1/2" not stocked)  $13.95 USD or 19.15 CAD   
 2X4X8'   $3.15 USD  or  $4.25 CAD
Decent 8'  1x3 is over $4

It wasn't all that long ago that 7/16 OSB was going for eight bucks and 2x4s were under two.
Ha!  The lumberyard I use doesn't list prices, so I spot-checked the local Canac big-box hardware store:
2x2x8': $1.48CAD ($1.08USD)
2x4x8': $1.99CAD ($1.42USD)
7/16 OSB (full sheet): $14.79CAD ($10.79USD)

Figure three 8' shelves would take (9) x 2x2x8' + (1) sheet 7/16 OSB + a few dozen nails/screws = $9.72+10.79+~$3=$24ish USD +tax.
Amazing how prices can differ so much from region to region & across borders.
« Last Edit: May 12, 2017, 08:39:12 AM by nereo »
"Do not confuse complexity with superiority"

neo von retorch

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2550
  • Location: SE PA
    • Fi@retorch - personal finance tracking
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2017, 08:11:06 AM »
Yes but a 1x2x8 furring strip is only $0.98 ;)

paddedhat

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2017, 10:28:42 AM »
Yes but a 1x2x8 furring strip is only $0.98 ;)

Meh, I just grabbed a bundle of them the other day. Good for tomato stakes and not much else. Actually I got them to tent an area off in my kitchen to demo. a section of plaster wall and ceiling. So 1x2 "framing"  and thin plastic worked great, and kept an evil volume of dust confined to inside the tent. I wouldn't trust them for building anything serious though.

HipGnosis

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1044
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2017, 04:24:28 PM »
2x4s are overkill for most home shelving.
Unless you know exactly what you're going to put on the shelves, I recommend making them to have plastic storage containers on the top shelf and under the bottom shelf.
And treat or seal the bottom 6" of the uprights.

neo von retorch

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2550
  • Location: SE PA
    • Fi@retorch - personal finance tracking
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #24 on: August 28, 2017, 12:50:10 PM »
Here's my overkill garage shelving!

2' x 8' - top shelve is 72" (plus 3/4" plywood) with 3 x 15" shelves and 23" below the bottom shelf.

Need to pick up more screws for the front supports as I ran out... and a keen eye will notice another minor mistake!

dcozad999

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 374
  • Location: Topeka, KS
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #25 on: August 28, 2017, 01:54:01 PM »
Nice.  I ended up building a 2' x 8' that was 7' high. 1/2 in. OSB for the shelves. I built it freestanding though.
Don't remember the exact dimensions I used for the height of each shelf, but made the bottom high enough to I could slip my Ego electric mower under it.
The 8' length was juuuuuust short enough that my wife can get into and out of the car, lol.


Still going to build a 2' x 8' for the basement storage.  Going to cap that at 6' though.

robartsd

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 959
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #26 on: August 28, 2017, 05:34:46 PM »
When we moved in a year ago, we had considered building custom shelving down there - largely because the low headroom (about 6' to bottom of floor joists) makes most off the shelf options too tall. DW noticed Costco had a sale for shelving, so we picked up 18" x 36" 5-tier plastic sheving for $20 each after realizing that we could simply buy 4 packs to make 5 sets of 4-tier shelves. Ended up buying 8 packs for the basement and ordering two extra sets of feet and caps from the manufacturer for less than $10 shipped. Now we have 10 4-tier shelving units lining the walls of the basement.

I like the bin rails idea for overhead in the garage. If you sacrifice random access, you could even increase the storage density of that idea.

bacchi

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2003
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #27 on: August 30, 2017, 11:30:39 AM »
I used plywood sheathing sitting on concrete blocks. One or two blocks, plywood, one or two blocks, plywood, etc. Fairly cheap, easy to set up or move, and can hold a lot.

neo von retorch

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2550
  • Location: SE PA
    • Fi@retorch - personal finance tracking
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #28 on: August 30, 2017, 11:35:46 AM »
Do you think the plywood in my set up will warp if I don't add support under that front edge?

paddedhat

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #29 on: August 30, 2017, 11:41:13 AM »
Do you think the plywood in my set up will warp if I don't add support under that front edge?

Yes, it sure will. It will even do so, under it's own weight, over time.

neo von retorch

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2550
  • Location: SE PA
    • Fi@retorch - personal finance tracking
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #30 on: August 30, 2017, 11:56:13 AM »
Earlier you mentioned "1x3 furring strips" - what do you think the minimum reinforcement should be used in this case? Is a 4' span too far? Need to be halved?

paddedhat

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #31 on: August 30, 2017, 02:14:35 PM »
neo, I would just install another piece of 2x4 under the front of the shelf and be done with it.

neo von retorch

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2550
  • Location: SE PA
    • Fi@retorch - personal finance tracking
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #32 on: August 30, 2017, 02:30:26 PM »
B-b-b-ut I used 2x3s and also that would suck up so much shelf height! Otherwise I would just agree with you and be done with it :)

robartsd

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 959
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #33 on: August 30, 2017, 03:51:13 PM »
Assuming uniform elasticity, stiffness is proportional to the depth of a bending member raised to the 4th power - so that "wasted" depth is an important component to efficient use of materials. Even a 2x member glued flat against the plywood should reduce deflection to about 2% of what it would be with the plywood alone.

paddedhat

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #34 on: August 30, 2017, 05:27:25 PM »
B-b-b-ut I used 2x3s and also that would suck up so much shelf height! Otherwise I would just agree with you and be done with it :)

Well, another option is to go to the hardwood selection at Lowes or HD and find a nice straight 1x2 piece of oak. If you are really wanting to save height, you can glue and screw the oak to the face of the plywood, if not glue and screw it to the bottom at the front edge.  Hopefully, I'm stating the obvious, but you want the bigger face (the 1-1/2 ", not the 3/4") to be vertical. If you have the 2x3s laying around you could also cut a groove, or notch in to them, and let the notch support the plywood, which would conserve space. All depends on your skill set and artistic vision :)

Goldielocks

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4291
  • Location: BC
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #35 on: August 30, 2017, 06:02:00 PM »
Here's my overkill garage shelving!

2' x 8' - top shelve is 72" (plus 3/4" plywood) with 3 x 15" shelves and 23" below the bottom shelf.

Need to pick up more screws for the front supports as I ran out... and a keen eye will notice another minor mistake!

You will dramatically increase the load capacity of each shelf if you put a 1.5" -2" deep edging strip along the front edge.   
Check it out:

http://www.woodbin.com/calcs/sagulator/

I did not read all the notes -- are you going to use some watco oil or urethane on these?  A quick wipe on product will help it stay looking nice.

Goldielocks

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4291
  • Location: BC
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #36 on: August 30, 2017, 06:03:39 PM »
B-b-b-ut I used 2x3s and also that would suck up so much shelf height! Otherwise I would just agree with you and be done with it :)

Don't use whole 2x4's -- it creates a lot of wasted space.  1" to 2" total depth, from top of the shelf surface.

lthenderson

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 878
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #37 on: August 31, 2017, 08:19:02 AM »
This is one of the ideas I was referring too. Much, much cheaper and easier.

http://www.practicaldiy.com/carpentry/shelving/shelf_bracket_fitting_2.php

All this talk of adding more wood to the front to prevent sagging and it taking up a large amount of space, (i.e. a 2x3 glued and screwed to the face of the shelves times four takes up 10" of space) is why I suggested the above linked method which would take up only 2" of space for the same number of shelves. Even less if you go with wire mesh shelving versus 1/2" plywood.

paddedhat

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #38 on: August 31, 2017, 08:42:27 AM »
This is one of the ideas I was referring too. Much, much cheaper and easier.

http://www.practicaldiy.com/carpentry/shelving/shelf_bracket_fitting_2.php

All this talk of adding more wood to the front to prevent sagging and it taking up a large amount of space, (i.e. a 2x3 glued and screwed to the face of the shelves times four takes up 10" of space) is why I suggested the above linked method which would take up only 2" of space for the same number of shelves. Even less if you go with wire mesh shelving versus 1/2" plywood.

I did a large installation recently using Rubbermaid double track and shelf brackets.  The shelves were white foil laminated with a bullnose edge, essentially dressed up 1x12s.  The job looks very professional, has no legs on the floor,  and can hold a serious amount of weight. I installed the vertical track on 32" centers.

http://www.rubbermaid.com/en-US/twin-track-hardware


Of course all of this circles back to what I mentioned early in this thead. Unless your time is free, and you don't mind spending 70-80% of what a commercial extremely heavy duty shelving costs, IMHO all of this cobbling plywood, and framing lumber, together is a poor use of time and resources.

https://www.costco.com/Alera-4-Shelf-Wire-Shelving-Rack%2C-48%E2%80%9D-x-18%E2%80%9D-72%E2%80%9D%2C--NSF%2C-Black-Anthracite-.product.11675553.html

I have built dozens of various wooden shelf setups. I guarantee that once you drag an eighty pound box of chromed steel, or black, commercial restaurant shelving off the UPS truck, spend a few minutes assembling it, and realizing that you just spent $100 for a product that is going to last your lifetime, can be disassembled and reconfigured, will safely support anything you can pile on it, and can be sold on CL when your done with it, you will do the same thing I did.  You will step back, admire it, and say to yourself,  "why the hell didn't I do this years ago?"

robartsd

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 959

sequoia

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 288
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #40 on: September 01, 2017, 01:32:25 AM »
I have built dozens of various wooden shelf setups. I guarantee that once you drag an eighty pound box of chromed steel, or black, commercial restaurant shelving off the UPS truck, spend a few minutes assembling it, and realizing that you just spent $100 for a product that is going to last your lifetime, can be disassembled and reconfigured, will safely support anything you can pile on it, and can be sold on CL when your done with it, you will do the same thing I did.  You will step back, admire it, and say to yourself,  "why the hell didn't I do this years ago?"

^ spot on! I came to the same conclusion as well.

lthenderson

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 878
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #41 on: September 01, 2017, 08:37:43 AM »
This is one of the ideas I was referring too. Much, much cheaper and easier.

http://www.practicaldiy.com/carpentry/shelving/shelf_bracket_fitting_2.php

All this talk of adding more wood to the front to prevent sagging and it taking up a large amount of space, (i.e. a 2x3 glued and screwed to the face of the shelves times four takes up 10" of space) is why I suggested the above linked method which would take up only 2" of space for the same number of shelves. Even less if you go with wire mesh shelving versus 1/2" plywood.

I did a large installation recently using Rubbermaid double track and shelf brackets.  The shelves were white foil laminated with a bullnose edge, essentially dressed up 1x12s.  The job looks very professional, has no legs on the floor,  and can hold a serious amount of weight. I installed the vertical track on 32" centers.

http://www.rubbermaid.com/en-US/twin-track-hardware


Of course all of this circles back to what I mentioned early in this thead. Unless your time is free, and you don't mind spending 70-80% of what a commercial extremely heavy duty shelving costs, IMHO all of this cobbling plywood, and framing lumber, together is a poor use of time and resources.

https://www.costco.com/Alera-4-Shelf-Wire-Shelving-Rack%2C-48%E2%80%9D-x-18%E2%80%9D-72%E2%80%9D%2C--NSF%2C-Black-Anthracite-.product.11675553.html

I have built dozens of various wooden shelf setups. I guarantee that once you drag an eighty pound box of chromed steel, or black, commercial restaurant shelving off the UPS truck, spend a few minutes assembling it, and realizing that you just spent $100 for a product that is going to last your lifetime, can be disassembled and reconfigured, will safely support anything you can pile on it, and can be sold on CL when your done with it, you will do the same thing I did.  You will step back, admire it, and say to yourself,  "why the hell didn't I do this years ago?"

I have done a lot of closets with that stuff and like it because it can be reconfigured as the child grows into an adult and their closet needs change.  I haven't used it in my garage simply because I do a lot of work in there and things get extremely dirty unless I close it in with cabinets.

paddedhat

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1968
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #42 on: September 01, 2017, 10:57:52 AM »

I have done a lot of closets with that stuff and like it because it can be reconfigured as the child grows into an adult and their closet needs change.  I haven't used it in my garage simply because I do a lot of work in there and things get extremely dirty unless I close it in with cabinets.

I'm guessing you are referring to the Rubbermaid shelf bracket system?  That actually makes a lot of sense. I typically run the usual Closetmaid  wire at 5' high, but having the ability to move everything would be nice.

acroy

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1311
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Dallas TX
    • SWAMI
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #43 on: September 01, 2017, 11:42:52 AM »
I like the wire shelving like attached. Pretty darn cheap, and when anchored to the studs, takes a $hit-ton of weight. Looks good, works great.

Run it all around 2-3 sides of the garage, 1-2 levels, and this way you don't loose any floor space either. if you've got more than fits on that much shelving, well then, that's another issue ;)
SWAMI (Satisfied Working Advanced Mustachian Individual) 1 stash, 1 DW, 7 Mini MM's...
God, Family, Country. Everything else is details.

lthenderson

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 878
Re: Garage Shelving
« Reply #44 on: September 01, 2017, 11:49:08 AM »
I'm guessing you are referring to the Rubbermaid shelf bracket system?

Yes or similar other brand systems. Some of them come with wire baskets that pull out for kids to load up with toys and push back into the closet which are popular.