Author Topic: Follow my bathroom remodel  (Read 1894 times)

Radagast

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Follow my bathroom remodel
« on: July 25, 2018, 12:42:15 AM »
My bathroom is in desperate condition. Visitors agree it is highly impressive we have lived with it for 5 years. Photos attached. This thread will document my progress in replacing. So far my only DIY remodeling experience was a kitchen that came out OK, so any pointers from knowing people are welcome. I propose to replace everything except the bathtub, the 1x shelving, all framing, and the window. Hopefully some of the sheet rock can remain also especially the stuff that holds up the ceiling insulation. I will document progress here.

The vanity is the center of the effort. I plan to use this for the vanity. I need a "floating" vanity to stay above a heater vent. Various sizes are possible, but to allow the door swing and keep a minimum 27" travel path at all locations this pushes the limit, and be 37" at the counter top.  Existing is a POS Glacier Bay vanity that is tiny, scratched, and shoddily screwed into the wall from the outside of the cabinet. $595 (%495 after 100 AmEx Houzz discount).

Toilet & Lid. My Rough-In distance will be 11.25 inches, which is retarded. Existing toilet is another POS Glacier Bay with 12-in rough-in pressed against the wall with the tank at an awkward angle, but I will be tiling which will remove about 3/8" so I need a 10-in rough-in I am nearly sure. Which will leave a huge gap, but oh well. Not many cost effective 10-inch rough in toilets. I want a small toilet, my bathroom is only 5 feet across and the existing toilet takes more than half that which is awkward. My connection is flat rate and unmetered, but if hypothetically metering stopped in the future this 1.28 gallon toilet should have a payback period of under ten years vs. a 1.6 gallon toilet.

Light/fan. I only have one switch. I accidentally burned the old one out a few weeks ago leaving it on during a holiday. That size is not commonly stocked now, hope this lasts a long time. I framed the old one to a new size, I have no desire to repeat even that small amount of framing hence the pricier unit.

Lighted mirror :-) Total overkill. Will replace tiny garbage looking medicine cabinet and cheapo lamp. Its not really harder to install than a new mirror and vanity light, and not much more expensive. But will look kick ass and be way more useful.

Door. Door is a nightmare. It must go around a blockout for the furnace exhaust which limits the options. It is 28x80, and I have no plans to redo the framing around the door. It takes up the space that would be very useful in a vanity. A sliding door cannot work because not enough space. Outward opening doors cannot work because not enough space. An accordion, bifold, or French doors cannot work because the effective opening after accounting for hinges and door with is about 24. It should either be 6 to the right or expanded to a 32 opening. The only option that makes sense for the effort I want is to keep the existing frame, replace the door slab, but change from right hand to left hand swing. Ill have to swap the light switch. https://www.homedepot.com/p/JELD-WEN-28-in-x-80-in-Princeton-Primed-Smooth-Solid-Core-Molded-Composite-MDF-Interior-Door-Slab-THDJW137200132/203617800

Other tasks include replacing floor tile per my wife (already selected), swapping a light switch to the opposite side of the door, adding an electrical outlet as bathroom currently has none, and adding a switch and connection for the mirror light. I will also place cement/hardiboard and sheet rock as needed, paint ceiling and part of the wall, sand paint and restore shelf, and possibly add top and bottom doors to shelf. The dominant theme of the new bathroom will be "almost everything white." Existing shower fixtures are new and will stay, but I need to replace the valve and handle. More about tile to follow.

If you have comments or suggestions on the above feel free to say, I am ordering this stuff tomorrow and won't start the big installs until next week.

Fixed links.

Spent so far:
$2,353.86


« Last Edit: September 01, 2018, 02:31:18 PM by Radagast »

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2018, 01:04:51 AM »
I am planning this bathroom to have lots of subway tile. I am seriously considering tiling floor to ceiling around about 70% of the bathroom perimeter, excluding the cabinet, wall with the door, and the walls around the dumb furnace blockout. I will cover approximately 20 linear feet at 8 feet high equals 160 square feet. I am not sure if this will look amazing, oppressive, or some completely other thing. The good news is I can stop at any time as I go up if it starts to look bad.  One alternative that I am not favoring right now is to align tiles vertically rather than horizontally.

The tile may possibly have a few color or texture highlights, or color above the tub edge, or a handful of black accents, or a finished edge. I am seriously thinking of a random number generator giving 1% black accent tiles randomly scattered. Like any good interior designer I modeled this in Excel, except that I will place one black tile randomly in every box of 100 white tiles so they will be more evenly distributed. Thoughts?


Will use 2 tile shelves over the tub. Also some bull nosing around the window.

Beyond that I need to figure out grout. I am thinking of using pre-mix grout because I know from experience that mixing and cleaning up after mixing sucks and is slow. I may need to use the matching sanded caulk around the tub.

The final perennial debate is wet tile saw vs score and snap. plus a jigsaw with tile blade for odd cuts. I am leaning towards the more expensive wet tile saw because I borrowed one in the past and am familiar with it and know what to do in different situations. But, the score and snap looks better to make straight cuts only and I am pretty sure I can get "good enough" with a jigsaw on the rest if I cover those up. I may have a hard time finding a used tile saw for sale in my area, and there are no rentals, but I will look around.

Fixed links




« Last Edit: July 27, 2018, 12:32:49 AM by Radagast »

swiper

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2018, 06:21:44 AM »
We are just finishing a DIY subway tiling on our kitchen backsplash and are generally happy with the results. A few thoughts:

- Ensure your startline is level. Everything builds from this line and you can correct floor "unlevelness" with trim & 1/4 round.
- Setting up a jig and pre-cutting tiles; for example  1/2 tile every second row around a door frame) can save significant time, as long as you measure correctly.
- We used spacers 1/16" (self spacing tiles look even easier). If you do use spacers, ensure that they go in all the way (consistency)
- Yes to premixed, grouting and cleaning takes significant time.
- ideally, try to finish cutline on less visible faces (eg inside corners)
- if you use an edging strip which goes partly under the tiles it'll push one edge of the tiles up. I corrected for this by shaving down 1/2 inch strip off the back of each tile that rested on the edging.

Design: Obviously your call, I personally prefer a clean classic look: horizontal layout and i'd add less permanent accents (pictures/plants etc) to break it up.

Tools: We used a tile scorer for much of the work. its much faster and less messy, but it fails at ripping tiles (horizontal split) and at small vertical cuts. I also have a cheapo wet saw ($70, sometimes you can find them used after one job) which worked great for the more complicated cuts.  Jig saw should work too, or an angle grinder.

I've attached a sample of the work we just did. Take your time and it'll look great.

craiglepaige

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2018, 07:11:37 AM »
@Radagast - your links, besides the HD one, are not working.
Can you take pictures showing the box out?

I like subway tiles but too much can be distracting - for my taste. As posted by swiper, your starting line must be perfect for the rest to follow. You can always hide imperfections on the flooring/ceiling with a trim piece if you want.
Good luck!

@swiper - great work on the kitchen.

lthenderson

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2018, 07:13:07 AM »
A couple thoughts I have done in bathroom remodels. If your exhaust fan is burnt out but the light part still works, rather than reframing a new fan opening or limiting myself to that particular size, I install inline exhaust fans in the space above the fan. (Assuming an attic here.) They are a lot more powerful than box units and are almost silent since they can be mounted anywhere along the exit duct and not inches from your bathroom ceiling. I just remove the guts of the existing burnt out fan to not impede airflow.

Secondly, have you considered a flush mount medicine cabinet. They essentially look like a mirror on the wall when done (and even have lighted ones) but when you open them up, you still have the medicine cabinet which fits into the stud cavity. Whenever I install one of these, it always makes the room feel much bigger and you still have storage space so your sink doesn't get cluttered up. If there isn't a vent pipe running up from the sink in that cavity, they are easy to install without any drywall work. Just measure and cut the drywall opening, remove the studs in the opening and do some blocking work. If you do have a vent pipe, then I have to remove some drywall to get it routed along side the new medicine cabinet rough opening and then re-drywall when done.

MrDelane

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2018, 07:22:44 AM »
I'm only popping in here to say that I feel your pain.
I opened this thread because we've been thinking about remodeling one of our bathrooms for a while, so I was curious to follow someone else's expierience.

I just had the hilarious and depressing experience of reading the original post.... nodding along with almost every detail.  Then I got to the photos.

I swear it feels like you broke into my house and posted pictures of our bathroom.
Same layout.  Same exact flooring tile.  Same problems.

Best of luck with the remodel.  I'm looking forward to watching your progress and learning along the way.

merula

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2018, 07:54:14 AM »
Your bathroom is in much, much better shape than mine was before my remodel. Threads on my project are Tiling Tub Surround for a tile beginner and Bathroom Saga Continued - Hex Tile Floor and Wainscoting. My goal was also "everything white".

How high is your heater vent? Ikea's vanities have front legs but not back ones, so they're able to go over wall stuff without being floating. (But, of course, if you'd prefer floating, go with that.)

I also had only one switch, but I desperately wanted my light and fan on separate circuits and I hate the double-sideways-switch things. I found this switch, and it's worked out really well.

I used pre-mixed grout and had pretty good results with it, but I don't think it cures as quickly as the mix-your-own kind, so take that into account.

I used both a score-and-snap and wet saw (borrowed from a tool library), and they each had their own benefits. Scoring was less messy, but with a slightly more ragged edge, but that didn't matter if it was a hidden edge. I also had a tile nipper, and didn't need a jigsaw between that and the saw's mitre capabilities.

If your walls are super straight and plumb, then pre-cutting tiles can make a lot of sense. My house was built in 1919, so my walls are not that at all, and the cuts varied by up to a half-inch.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2018, 06:46:04 AM by merula »

soccerluvof4

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2018, 02:56:23 PM »
Good Luck! Just finished ours. Biggest problem we had was the floors. We had cheapo 40 year old linoleum and to get the floor matching the heights of the other floors I had to rip all the base out and install new subfloor.  In the end it was worth it just alot of labor and real sweat! equity. Mine was a full gut and reconfiguration. You will feel great when its done though!

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2018, 11:15:12 PM »
I fixed the links. Most are pretty boring anyhow! Only the mirror and vanity are really worth a look.

Attached at the bottom is another view showing the dumb 20x20 jig in the wall, and the 1x12 shelf. The shelf will detract from the look of the updated bathroom even if I try very hard to improve it but it is very useful. I'm thinking about adding doors to cover the top 2 and bottom 2 shelves (two pairs of doors total). The furnace block out really obstructs the door. Compared to the image below

where the vanity extends full length and the door can still swing fully open. Well, I can't do that. The vanity has to stay 30" back from the wall with the door so it can open, and even then I need to reverse the current opening side so it will be more accessible. Otherwise though the above pic is similar to what I want, down to the concept of a few black accents (taken from merula's thread).

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #9 on: July 25, 2018, 11:24:09 PM »
A couple thoughts I have done in bathroom remodels. If your exhaust fan is burnt out but the light part still works, rather than reframing a new fan opening or limiting myself to that particular size, I install inline exhaust fans in the space above the fan. (Assuming an attic here.) They are a lot more powerful than box units and are almost silent since they can be mounted anywhere along the exit duct and not inches from your bathroom ceiling. I just remove the guts of the existing burnt out fan to not impede airflow.

Secondly, have you considered a flush mount medicine cabinet. They essentially look like a mirror on the wall when done (and even have lighted ones) but when you open them up, you still have the medicine cabinet which fits into the stud cavity. Whenever I install one of these, it always makes the room feel much bigger and you still have storage space so your sink doesn't get cluttered up. If there isn't a vent pipe running up from the sink in that cavity, they are easy to install without any drywall work. Just measure and cut the drywall opening, remove the studs in the opening and do some blocking work. If you do have a vent pipe, then I have to remove some drywall to get it routed along side the new medicine cabinet rough opening and then re-drywall when done.
Unfortunately the entire unit is dead, and the light is rather important even with a secondary one available. Good tip though!

I also looked into the medicine cabinet. I don't really have anything against it, and I'll be fixing drywall in that area anyhow to remove the existing aged tiny one. But if I leave the large shelf in place on the opposite wall there will be plenty of storage space and I just don't see myself putting in another.

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #10 on: July 25, 2018, 11:27:00 PM »
I'm only popping in here to say that I feel your pain.
I opened this thread because we've been thinking about remodeling one of our bathrooms for a while, so I was curious to follow someone else's expierience.

I just had the hilarious and depressing experience of reading the original post.... nodding along with almost every detail.  Then I got to the photos.

I swear it feels like you broke into my house and posted pictures of our bathroom.
Same layout.  Same exact flooring tile.  Same problems.

Best of luck with the remodel.  I'm looking forward to watching your progress and learning along the way.
Same flooring tile! Must not be coincidence! I am ok with the existing tile because even though it is cheap it is competently installed. We will be replacing with also cheap tile that my wife likes the look of better, but competently installed is still in the air.

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #11 on: July 25, 2018, 11:43:09 PM »
Your bathroom is in much, much better shape than mine was before my remodel. Threads on my project are Tiling Tub Surround for a tile beginner and Bathroom Saga Continued - Hex Tile Floor and Wainscoting. My goal was also "everything white".
Well if it was any worse I would have fixed it earlier :-D. Care to share any "after" photos of yours?

Quote
How high is your heater vent? Ikea's vanities have front legs but not back ones, so they're able to go over wall stuff without being floating. (But, of course, if you'd prefer floating, go with that.)
It tops out 12" above existing tile to the top of the grate, which is pretty good. The thing is, legs are just inviting damage from errant mops while they interfere with cleaning. It seems as if the floating vanity will make life simpler.

Quote
I also had only one switch, but I desperately wanted my light and fan on separate circuits and I hate the double-sideways-switch things. I found this switch, and it's worked out really well.
I guess I can't understand from the link description. I only have a single set of copper wire running from the fan to light switch, and I am OK enough with just a single circuit to not run an additional wire. But are you saying that switch somehow allows the fan and light to be controlled from a single switch even though they share just one wire pair?

Quote
I used pre-mixed grout and had pretty good results with it, but I don't think it cures as quickly as the mix-your-own kind, so take that into account.
Good to hear about the grout. The types I looked at seem to refer to "drying" rather than "curing". I'll be doing this in Nevada in the summer, the moisture content of all materials will be 0 and air humidity will be like 10% so slow drying time is not one of my concerns.

Quote
I used both a score-and-snap and wet saw (borrowed from a tool library), and they each had their own benefits. Scoring was less messy, but with a slightly more ragged edge, but that didn't matter if it was a hidden edge. I also had a tile nipper, and didn't need a jigsaw between that and the saw's mitre capabilities.

If your walls are super straight and plumb, then pre-cutting tiles can make a lot of sense. My house was built in 1919, so my walls are not that at all, and the cuts varied by up to a half-inch.
I wish I had a rent-a-center or tool library. But the good news is I am looking at the same tile saw! Did you think it was worth $80 more than a score-and-snap cutter if you chose only one? I'll precut half widths to get started, then I think I'll just tile to the edges and come back and cut the leftovers later, unless I have someone helping.

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #12 on: July 25, 2018, 11:44:04 PM »
Good Luck! Just finished ours. Biggest problem we had was the floors. We had cheapo 40 year old linoleum and to get the floor matching the heights of the other floors I had to rip all the base out and install new subfloor.  In the end it was worth it just alot of labor and real sweat! equity. Mine was a full gut and reconfiguration. You will feel great when its done though!
The existing floor is pretty well done in mine, I hope I can match that without too much work but we'll see!

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #13 on: July 26, 2018, 12:30:57 AM »

This image from a questionable website is the only real image I found of random black tiles. Mine would have just 1 black tile on average for the surface area shown, with 16 total in the 160 SF tiled area. Plus all my stuff will be white. So, it will be vaguely similar to the photo but a lot more white. Also my placement will be more random. If I go for it. I might just order the $20 black tiles and then lay things out to get an idea of the look before choosing.


Or something like this, but black tile, and even sparser.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2018, 12:32:39 AM by Radagast »

merula

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #14 on: July 26, 2018, 07:13:42 AM »
Apparently I messed up the link to my second thread in my original post. Fixed now for posterity, also here.

I guess I can't understand from the link description. I only have a single set of copper wire running from the fan to light switch, and I am OK enough with just a single circuit to not run an additional wire. But are you saying that switch somehow allows the fan and light to be controlled from a single switch even though they share just one wire pair?

My light and fan were wired together, with one set of wires running to the switch, so I had to first separate them out by running an extra set of wires to the light, leaving the existing set to power the fan separately. (This was more involved and complicated than it should have been because of my house's age and past owners' unique building techniques, but in an ideal setting it'd involve running wire in empty wall cavities from an unfinished attic or basement.) The switch only solved the problem of not wanting to frame out a double electrical box.

Good to hear about the grout. The types I looked at seem to refer to "drying" rather than "curing". I'll be doing this in Nevada in the summer, the moisture content of all materials will be 0 and air humidity will be like 10% so slow drying time is not one of my concerns.

Oh yeah, Nevada in summer is a far different story from Minnesota in winter. You'll be fine. I'm not entirely sure if it's curing or drying, probably doesn't matter all that much.

I wish I had a rent-a-center or tool library. But the good news is I am looking at the same tile saw! Did you think it was worth $80 more than a score-and-snap cutter if you chose only one? I'll precut half widths to get started, then I think I'll just tile to the edges and come back and cut the leftovers later, unless I have someone helping.

Yes, I would definitely say the saw was worth $80 more than the cutter.

I probably woudn't do any cuts just to start with. Based on advice I got from the John Bridge forums, I started laying tile by screwing a 2x4 level at about 2 tile widths above the tub edge. (Because my tub, like everything else in my house, is not level.) I placed my first tile centered on the long wall at that level, and then worked outwards. I ended up with both sides being about 3/4 of a tile on that side, so then I continued around the corners starting with ~1/4 pieces (so the effect was sort of like the tile bent around the corner). I had some leeway with where I ended on one of the short sides, so I decided to end with full/half tiles, but that was only a handful.


If you're keeping your existing floor, I'd recommend being meticulously careful when you're doing the rest of the work. I redid my floor after my shower, and I was somewhat careful because I didn't how long it'd be between the two jobs, but my floor was in pretty bad shape after the shower.

I think the random black tile thing would be a cool effect, but I wouldn't rely solely on a computerized random generation, because what appears random to a human eye and what is actually random can vary quite a bit.

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #15 on: July 26, 2018, 09:17:47 PM »
Ordered the vanity. I got a $100 Houzz discount from American Express, plus another $45 saved in cash back from the same card. I got that from buying Home Depot gift cards at 6% back from Kroger while saving another $50 in gas from the resulting fuel points. All things considered not very bad-ass, but it felt satisfying.

(photo from product review)

I'm not entirely sure if it's curing or drying, probably doesn't matter all that much.
FYI, for concrete work or anything with Portland cement, there is a huge difference. Drying is mechanical, where water physically departs. Curing is a chemical reaction, where the water reacts to give the cement its strength. If concrete dries before it cures it ends up weak and covered with cracks. So hopefully they labeled it right or I might have weak grout!
« Last Edit: July 26, 2018, 09:29:50 PM by Radagast »

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2018, 11:47:26 PM »
Progress is progressing. All the parts shipped from out of town (vanity, mirror, toilet, fan, accent tiles) have arrived. Have already spent more than $2,000. I will probably top out at around $2,500k for materials and tools.

I replaced the fan/light and swapped the switch to the opposite side of the door. The fan replacement was about as easy as I expected, requiring some drywall work around the edges of the hole after I kicked the old one out of the ceiling, but the wiring was smoother than I expected possibly because this was my second time. Swapping the light switch was way easier than I expected, as I easily located the wires in the attic and fed them down the other side of the door already the right length.

Removed the garbage vanity and old medicine cabinet. Added some 1X3s to the existing cabinet for future doors and sanded. Removed tile baseboard. Possible difficulties: the existing sink stubs are too long to work with the vanity without modifying one or the other.

oneday

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #17 on: August 08, 2018, 01:38:47 PM »
Yay...remodel with pictures!

craiglepaige

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #18 on: August 08, 2018, 05:38:54 PM »
Looking good.

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #19 on: August 11, 2018, 09:35:25 PM »
Painted ceiling and 1x12 cabinet white, good ol white not 1ppm yellow white. Destroyed the shower surround. Lessons learned: 1) protect your tub from falling tile and errant pry bar swings. I have a few chips to touch up now. Amateur mistake. 2) Hardibacker is probably better than cement board, the fiber on the cement board has been sticking to the grout better than the board which pulls up as a big tangly mess and leaves a big crumbly mess. 3) gin and tonic is amazing. 4) Never buy a house witb only 1 bathroom.

misshathaway

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #20 on: August 12, 2018, 10:36:01 AM »
You only have one bathroom! I've been following the whole thing. You are a Work Machine and it will be worth it.

lthenderson

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #21 on: August 14, 2018, 07:46:44 AM »
4) Never buy a house witb only 1 bathroom.

Now THAT is what you call an incentive!

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #22 on: September 16, 2018, 11:37:29 PM »
Subway Tiles are Good, and Easy to Win


Roboturner

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #23 on: September 17, 2018, 11:36:39 AM »
Looking good! we plan on doing a similar transformation, any tips you learned while setting the subway tile you'd want to share?

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #24 on: September 17, 2018, 08:15:17 PM »
You have spent lots of money!  And ya, it looks good.

misshathaway

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #25 on: September 18, 2018, 12:14:36 PM »
I had my private doubts about the randomly spaced black tiles but it looks great. Keeps the white from being too antiseptic. Nice job.

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #26 on: September 18, 2018, 11:33:45 PM »
Looking good! we plan on doing a similar transformation, any tips you learned while setting the subway tile you'd want to share?
If you extend the tile past the tub, use a straight board along the entire bathroom, and not just over the places beyond the tub. I didn't fully understand this and figured by tub was square, which it is. I bumped my board into it to a tile would be flush across the tub and board meeting point. Then I leveled the board with a 2 ft bubble level. However the tub was square but not level. Now my tiles have two different versions of level: "tub level" and "gravity level." I would choose "tub level" for the entire project if I did it again, because the rest of the bathroom matches "tub level." In the above photo you can see the change in tile orientation of about 1 or 1/2% on the left hand side. Good news is the vanity, mirror, and toilet will hide it.

Mix-it-yourself grout is less expensive, but it takes time to mix at the start and clean up at the end. It may be a good choice if you work 12-hour days. If you plan to tile for two hours every day after work like I do, then use pre-mixed grout. It is more expensive and non-cementitious, but the time you save will be worth it.

White does not always mean white, and definitions of white change over time. Always use tiles from the same batch. I tried to use tiles left from my kitchen a few years ago and they were not the same white. I already knew this but broke the rule to my regret when I had to pull an hour worth of tiles off the wall.

I like 1/16th spacers for subway tiles. I used them for my 12X24 floor tiles too but that was a bad choice, the floors should have had 1/4 inch spacers.

Probably others, but the nice thing about subway tiles is they look nice, aren't that expensive, and are hard to screw up.

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #27 on: September 18, 2018, 11:37:08 PM »
You have spent lots of money!  And ya, it looks good.
Ouch! You are right, I was thinking it was not bad but I guess I am becoming an "advanced mustachian." I hope it pays for itself and then some in terms of added value and reduced maintenance.

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #28 on: September 18, 2018, 11:40:17 PM »
I had my private doubts about the randomly spaced black tiles but it looks great. Keeps the white from being too antiseptic. Nice job.
Thanks! As I go I see other ways to get to a similar point with only white tiles everywhere, like black bullnose tile around the window, black fixtures, black towel bars, etc. But I am happy with the smattered black tiles.

Funny story, I originally intended to place the tiles randomly, but ended up just putting them wherever because random is too much work.

misshathaway

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #29 on: September 19, 2018, 10:23:12 AM »
You were going to use a random number generator to plan them? LOL Are you a programmer? Your eyes probably made a more pleasing placement anyway.

It's a little troubling that it's your only bathroom and you still seem to have no toilet. I'd say that's pretty hardcore Mustachian. Or maybe it's randomly placed elsewhere in the house.

Radagast

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Re: Follow my bathroom remodel
« Reply #30 on: October 19, 2018, 11:49:07 PM »
Yes, it is possible to find studs through subway tile using magnets from Home Depot. Good thing to learn! Originally I had hoped to keep this thread updated more regularly but in practice I find I dont want to think about it during me time off!