Author Topic: Considering a large recessed lighting job  (Read 480 times)

jeromedawg

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Considering a large recessed lighting job
« on: June 15, 2018, 03:31:13 PM »
Hey all,

We've been considering updating our lighting to go fully-recessed in our condo. I would think this would probably be worth it in the long-run (for when we go to sell) but I'm trying to figure out if it's worth it to DIY versus just hire someone to knock it out faster. We have about 8 existing retrofit lights but they are ancient (very early tension spring light housings that aren't the more traditional cans). We would be looking at possibly adding at least 20 or more lights throughout the condo. I'm actually not 100% sure how many lights per room but the ceilings in most parts of the house run around 9'

I watched some videos and the retrofit cans seem 'straightforward' to update the existing lighting but I don't want to be presumptuous either. I figure if I really wanted to DIY, it might be a good idea to tackle it a room/area at a time rather than trying to go gung-ho and cut holes the ceiling in every room. Also, in our kitchen we have fluorescent light bars, so I'm not sure what most people usually do in that case: install the recessed lighting in the 'recessed' area where the light bars were?

The other concern is the permitting for electrical work and making sure everything is up to code. I really have little to no experience with any of this kind of stuff.

I figure this is a pretty big job for our condo (1300sq ft), so would like to take my time considering the possibilities.

A friend of mine had his done 5-6 years ago and it cost him around $2000 for 26 lights in his place including the dimmer switches. I actually reached out to the electrician who did the install but I never followed-through to have him come out and do a quote. I'm thinking his prices probably went up at this point.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2018, 03:35:34 PM by jeromedawg »
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Linda_Norway

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Re: Considering a large recessed lighting job
« Reply #1 on: July 10, 2018, 04:45:16 AM »
If it is an expensive job, that why not do it only in the mostly used rooms? My house has these downlights in the hallways and kitchen, but not in the bedrooms and not in the living room that doesn't have a flat roof.

Roots&Wings

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Re: Considering a large recessed lighting job
« Reply #2 on: July 10, 2018, 06:44:27 AM »
An architect friend loves these, the I can't believe it's not recessed LED lights: http://www.waclighting.com/product/3272

Jon Bon

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Re: Considering a large recessed lighting job
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2018, 01:15:29 PM »
An architect friend loves these, the I can't believe it's not recessed LED lights: http://www.waclighting.com/product/3272

ok that is awesome!

Crap, buy those dont even mess around with ripping out and replacing!

I am totally going to get some of these next time I replace lights....


letired

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Re: Considering a large recessed lighting job
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2018, 01:57:02 PM »
An architect friend loves these, the I can't believe it's not recessed LED lights: http://www.waclighting.com/product/3272

^^ +1 My friends are using a similar product in their current reno. They look like the can lights but install much easier (apparently, I haven't looked into it).

jeromedawg

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Re: Considering a large recessed lighting job
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2018, 05:10:15 PM »
An architect friend loves these, the I can't believe it's not recessed LED lights: http://www.waclighting.com/product/3272

^^ +1 My friends are using a similar product in their current reno. They look like the can lights but install much easier (apparently, I haven't looked into it).

An architect friend loves these, the I can't believe it's not recessed LED lights: http://www.waclighting.com/product/3272

ok that is awesome!

Crap, buy those dont even mess around with ripping out and replacing!

I am totally going to get some of these next time I replace lights....

Do you guys know more details about the install? From the install instruction picture it *seems* you still have to install a junction box for each one...unless that's simply for illustration and it's possible to run multiple wiring out of a junction box to multiple lights?

Seems like these wouldn't make for good retrofit candidates either. The problem, and reason, why I'd want to at least retrofit the existing cans is because they're held in place by tension springs... so if there's an earthquake or our neighbors are stomping, or just over time, it's possible for the springs to give and the cans to pop out of place. This is what happened the other day that prompted me to initially post about this. It would be nice just to replace the boxes/fixtures completely with something newer and much more stable. Not sure what would make sense though.
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letired

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Re: Considering a large recessed lighting job
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2018, 08:23:20 PM »
I've done zero research, but my understanding is that they do need a junction box, but a standard box is much more shallow than a full can light. My friends are into it because that lets them install the the insulation they want instead of having to cut more holes in it to accommodate the large can fixture.

jeromedawg

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Re: Considering a large recessed lighting job
« Reply #7 on: July 12, 2018, 09:07:58 AM »
I've done zero research, but my understanding is that they do need a junction box, but a standard box is much more shallow than a full can light. My friends are into it because that lets them install the the insulation they want instead of having to cut more holes in it to accommodate the large can fixture.

That makes sense... so you still would have to cut holes in the ceiling but they would likely be smaller and not *as much* effort with installing a junction box versus a full on fixture (since those things are bulky and awkward)
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jeromedawg

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Re: Considering a large recessed lighting job
« Reply #8 on: July 12, 2018, 10:06:05 AM »
I got a rough estimate on a per light/switch/power basis and it's expensive. Close to $3k for everything. $75 per light and $35 per switch. He won't be able to retrofit existing lights, and would have to rip out the existing cans and install new lights, so it would still cost $50 to replace each of those. Then to replace the T4 lighting, it would cost $100 to fill and frame the recessed areas and then $75 per light still. So yea, it may make the most sense just to have him install lights in the rooms that don't have any lighting and maybe to replace the T4s and other fixtures, then investigate slowly DIYing the other fixtures or something...
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 10:09:33 AM by jeromedawg »
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