Author Topic: DIY clothes (sewing)  (Read 27275 times)

Maya

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Re: DIY clothes (sewing)
« Reply #150 on: February 17, 2020, 08:34:07 AM »
I can't wait to see a picture of the tent!

Goldielocks

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Re: DIY clothes (sewing)
« Reply #151 on: February 18, 2020, 01:01:48 AM »
okay,  i will try to add photos.
I have completed the tarp part - I added a tail to the back to block more wind, but it needs adjustment to have it line up with the rest of the canopy.

These are photos of the front and with my rain poncho as an extra vestibule. It is a "plexamid" style based on a a 1/2 pyramid tarp setup. There is a vent at the top. It uses trekking poles to set up. Next, I add in screening and a zipper and affix that to the bathtub style ground sheet (the plastic you see messy at the bottom).

When complete, it will be about 14 oz / 400g plus stakes, tie-outs and a small bag.  I am hoping for under 500g total.
The peak is sitting at 125cm in this photo, and there is ample room to sit up and stretch out.

I used 70" wide Silpoly waterproof fabric, which means almost no seams in the middle to leak.
Cost worked out to roughly $45 USD for materials, plus thread and shipping. 

I could buy a ligher DCF style, similar but more durable floor, a couple more features, for $549 USD, and 70g lighter, and doesn't need my poncho.
« Last Edit: February 18, 2020, 01:12:58 AM by Goldielocks »

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: DIY clothes (sewing)
« Reply #152 on: February 18, 2020, 10:13:17 AM »
I own a serger that paid for itself after the first major project, and a basic sewing machine also that paid for itself after a bit of tailoring work. Overall, I've found the best value comes from either being able to buy high quality secondhand items and alter them to fit the wearer and the trend, to extend the life of high-priced items such as outerwear or uniforms, or to make things that would otherwise cost a lot of money.

Altering wedding gowns and hemming prom dresses has been a good source of side gig income, and I've also been able to help friends and relatives who aren't a mainstream size or body shape to enjoy used wedding gowns or formal wear. It's fairly easy to buy a used wedding gown if you're a size 2 through 12, but once you get into size 14 and up the options diminish and there are very few plus-size gowns available.

Another poster has mentioned making curtains, and I agree that it's a great way to get a nice look for very little money. I'd also like to add upholstery to the list of ways to save money. Being able to make a bit of piping and put together a chair seat will extend the life and comfort of kitchen and dining room chairs. You can also buy used furniture and restore it if you wish. Upholstering is not quite the same as sewing but some sewing is generally required. You also have the option of making slipcovers and arm covers for your furniture to extend the life.

I'm halfway through a major re-upholstery project and have saved myself several hundred dollars.

Linea_Norway

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Re: DIY clothes (sewing)
« Reply #153 on: February 22, 2020, 05:03:28 AM »
okay,  i will try to add photos.
I have completed the tarp part - I added a tail to the back to block more wind, but it needs adjustment to have it line up with the rest of the canopy.

These are photos of the front and with my rain poncho as an extra vestibule. It is a "plexamid" style based on a a 1/2 pyramid tarp setup. There is a vent at the top. It uses trekking poles to set up. Next, I add in screening and a zipper and affix that to the bathtub style ground sheet (the plastic you see messy at the bottom).

When complete, it will be about 14 oz / 400g plus stakes, tie-outs and a small bag.  I am hoping for under 500g total.
The peak is sitting at 125cm in this photo, and there is ample room to sit up and stretch out.

I used 70" wide Silpoly waterproof fabric, which means almost no seams in the middle to leak.
Cost worked out to roughly $45 USD for materials, plus thread and shipping. 

I could buy a ligher DCF style, similar but more durable floor, a couple more features, for $549 USD, and 70g lighter, and doesn't need my poncho.

Looks neat!

Maya

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Re: DIY clothes (sewing)
« Reply #154 on: February 23, 2020, 05:46:30 PM »
That looks awesome @Goldielocks