Author Topic: Cast iron reseasoning  (Read 36264 times)

Tom Bri

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Re: Cast iron reseasoning
« Reply #150 on: August 20, 2016, 09:16:31 PM »
My Lodge pan sat unevenly on the flat cooktop. I realized it wasn't warped, just the Lodge logo in the center was slightly higher than the rest of the pan bottom. I used a steel file to take off a bit and now it sits flat.

You used a file?  By hand?  Dude, belt sander!

Don't own one. It only took a few minutes anyway.

With This Herring

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Re: Cast iron reseasoning
« Reply #151 on: August 21, 2016, 12:24:21 AM »
My Lodge pan sat unevenly on the flat cooktop. I realized it wasn't warped, just the Lodge logo in the center was slightly higher than the rest of the pan bottom. I used a steel file to take off a bit and now it sits flat.

You used a file?  By hand?  Dude, belt sander!

Don't own one. It only took a few minutes anyway.

Wait, you don't keep one in the oddments drawer in your kitchen along with spatulas, skewers, and the rolling pin?

Tom Bri

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Re: Cast iron reseasoning
« Reply #152 on: August 21, 2016, 12:33:24 AM »
My Lodge pan sat unevenly on the flat cooktop. I realized it wasn't warped, just the Lodge logo in the center was slightly higher than the rest of the pan bottom. I used a steel file to take off a bit and now it sits flat.

You used a file?  By hand?  Dude, belt sander!

Don't own one. It only took a few minutes anyway.

Wait, you don't keep one in the oddments drawer in your kitchen along with spatulas, skewers, and the rolling pin?

I own an electric drill (and regret breaking my manual one), a circular sander, and a soldering iron. No other power tools. Oh, and a chainsaw. Pretty much do everything with hand power. Even my lawn mower is a reel mower. I'd love to have a fully furnished shop but hate spending money.

With This Herring

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Re: Cast iron reseasoning
« Reply #153 on: August 21, 2016, 01:43:51 AM »
My Lodge pan sat unevenly on the flat cooktop. I realized it wasn't warped, just the Lodge logo in the center was slightly higher than the rest of the pan bottom. I used a steel file to take off a bit and now it sits flat.

You used a file?  By hand?  Dude, belt sander!

Don't own one. It only took a few minutes anyway.

Wait, you don't keep one in the oddments drawer in your kitchen along with spatulas, skewers, and the rolling pin?

I own an electric drill (and regret breaking my manual one), a circular sander, and a soldering iron. No other power tools. Oh, and a chainsaw. Pretty much do everything with hand power. Even my lawn mower is a reel mower. I'd love to have a fully furnished shop but hate spending money.

I'm sure your file is a fine choice.  We were referencing a little joke from upthread:


It's fine!  It's a nice lump of shaped iron.  Even if it has rust on it now, besides the burn marks, it's fine.  Just heat it up, scrub it out, and reseason it before you use it.  The only ways you can permanently hurt your pan would be to drop it enough to crack it or heat it so quickly and unevenly that it warps.  If it is still as pan-shaped as when you got it, with no cracks, it is fine.

^ This!  And if it really rusty or unsightly, take a sander to it.  That will take the rust right off, easy peasy.  Then re-season and you are good to go. 

And by the way, since we are comparing the merits of cast iron vs. Teflon, can you fix your Teflon pan with a belt sander?  If the answer is no, it is time to rethink your choice of cookware  :)

I have honestly never thought of a belt sander as a kitchen appliance. Thank you for expanding my frame of reference. :D