Author Topic: Antenna for TV  (Read 2795 times)

soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3380
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
    • My Journal
Antenna for TV
« on: December 20, 2017, 03:30:55 AM »
Ok, So I Cut my cable and Just have Wifi. We also have Netflix and get Hulu for free through our phone provider. So the cable comes into the house to a splitter and goes to the TV's throughout the house this I know.

Here are my questions as I would just like to get a few local live stations for morning news etc.. and all the streaming I find either costs money or asks for my TV provider which I no longer have. I am an early riser so would like some local news if possible. Hate the big networks. Anyhow, here are my questions-

We have all "Smart Tv's" if that matters

1) Someone said to me since all the channels are digital these days and antenna wont work is this true? and or do i need to buy one of those little converter boxes that the cable company I use to have ? if so where do you get them.

2) Does Roku get you the local channels as I only need this for really one TV in the house

3) Getting ahead of myself here If I get an antenna I am assuming it would need a cable on it so if I plugged it into the splitter would this not then interfere with my wifi as dont they come into the house on the same cable.  My internet provider is Spectrum the old time warner.


Any suggestions on an Antenna or other advice would be great. Ideally I have a cable line to the second floor so I was thinking it would be great to put Antenna at end of that cable as well since its hooked up to splitter in basement But I wouldnt need to .

For the record the one TV i would need this for is on the main floor all the cable comes in on side of house and splitter is in basement. If it works I would not be opposed to a single unit stand alone for this Tv. And it is also the TV that when I did have cable had the main cable box not one of the little converter boxes.

Thanks,


Frankies Girl

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2748
  • Age: 80
  • Location: The laboratory
  • Typical Ghoul Next Door
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2017, 04:32:17 AM »
That someone (1) is wrong/confused. They are likely thinking about the switch up years ago from analog to digital signal, and you had to get a converter box to hook up your old school television/analog antenna if you wanted to be able to receive the new digital signal once the stations all switched over to digital and stopped producing the analog broadcasts.

You can absolutely get a digital antenna to hook directly to your TV. You just need to look for "digital antenna" in your searches. I have only a digital antenna, and I can pick up about 20-30 different channels, like ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS, FOX, etc...

No idea abut Roku.

I have my TV running our Netflix and such through our bluray player or the gaming system depending on which controller is handy. I have no issue with watching through the antenna or switching over to streaming - just need to change the inputs. Has nothing to do with how they are plugged into the TV; you'd just need something that attaches to the TV to stream, and have the antenna attached as well and it's super easy once you look at the instructions (literally plug in the correct port and you're good other than fiddling with the antenna placement).

I don't think you can use one single antenna for multiple TVs in your house. My Dh says maybe if you want to get a splitter box, run cables from that to all over the house... it might be easier to just buy a few antennas to hook directly to each TV, but I'm not an expert on that at all.
« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 04:35:09 AM by Frankies Girl »

Khaetra

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 527
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #2 on: December 20, 2017, 05:36:26 AM »
Head over to antennaweb and put your address in.  It will tell you what channels you can get and what kind of antenna you'll need.  If you're close enough, just a set of rabbit ears might work if you're not picky about the news.  You do NOT need a "Digital Antenna", as those are just marketing buzzwords (I have an old '70's RadioShack antenna, picks everything up just fine).

Roku can pick up local news channels, you need to search for the app for one of your local stations if it's available but they only broadcast news when they are live (6 am, 5-6 pm, etc.).  If you want other National programming then you would need the antenna.

soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3380
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
    • My Journal
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #3 on: December 20, 2017, 05:58:31 AM »
Head over to antennaweb and put your address in.  It will tell you what channels you can get and what kind of antenna you'll need.  If you're close enough, just a set of rabbit ears might work if you're not picky about the news.  You do NOT need a "Digital Antenna", as those are just marketing buzzwords (I have an old '70's RadioShack antenna, picks everything up just fine).

Roku can pick up local news channels, you need to search for the app for one of your local stations if it's available but they only broadcast news when they are live (6 am, 5-6 pm, etc.).  If you want other National programming then you would need the antenna.
That someone (1) is wrong/confused. They are likely thinking about the switch up years ago from analog to digital signal, and you had to get a converter box to hook up your old school television/analog antenna if you wanted to be able to receive the new digital signal once the stations all switched over to digital and stopped producing the analog broadcasts.

You can absolutely get a digital antenna to hook directly to your TV. You just need to look for "digital antenna" in your searches. I have only a digital antenna, and I can pick up about 20-30 different channels, like ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS, FOX, etc...

No idea abut Roku.

I have my TV running our Netflix and such through our bluray player or the gaming system depending on which controller is handy. I have no issue with watching through the antenna or switching over to streaming - just need to change the inputs. Has nothing to do with how they are plugged into the TV; you'd just need something that attaches to the TV to stream, and have the antenna attached as well and it's super easy once you look at the instructions (literally plug in the correct port and you're good other than fiddling with the antenna placement).

I don't think you can use one single antenna for multiple TVs in your house. My Dh says maybe if you want to get a splitter box, run cables from that to all over the house... it might be easier to just buy a few antennas to hook directly to each TV, but I'm not an expert on that at all.



Awesome ! Thank you both

Uturn

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 623
  • Age: 48
  • Location: Holly Springs, NC
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2017, 06:15:58 AM »
The previous owner of my house had satellite.  When I moved in and ordered cable, but installer just unplugged the dish and plugged in the cable to the existing coax.  When I got rid of cable, I unplugged it and plugged in a digital antenna.  I used the dish mount pole already on the roof.  I'm sure there are many splitters scattered around my house.  I have one antenna and it works on 4 tv's.  Roku will not get you local channels. 

The channel availability changes with the weather. 

Fishindude

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1829
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #5 on: December 20, 2017, 06:55:52 AM »
When we moved to our rural location 25+ years ago it was pre-satellite TV and cable wasn't available so we installed an antenna.
That antenna recently pooped out and we had to replace the upper part for $750.   We get in the neighborhood of 25 channels for free vs a satellite which would run over $100 per month.

GuitarStv

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 11850
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #6 on: December 20, 2017, 08:13:24 AM »
You do NOT need a "Digital Antenna"

+1

There are two frequencies that TV gets broadcast on, UHF (channels 14-51) and VHF (channels 2-13).  Some antennas are designed to pick up one, or the other, or both.  A good antenna that worked for analog signal will work fine for digital as well in the frequency range it was designed for.

katsiki

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1135
  • Age: 38
  • Location: La.
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #7 on: December 20, 2017, 08:18:26 AM »
2) Does Roku get you the local channels as I only need this for really one TV in the house

Probably but this varies by location.  In my area, 3 of the 4 local channels (major affiliates) have roku channels.  One is live and the others are "clips".  The live one is great for local news when we want / need it. 

You can probably check your local channels' web sites to see if they advertise "apps".  This is usually how they show it.  ie apple, android, roku, etc

lthenderson

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1139
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #8 on: December 20, 2017, 09:30:34 AM »
When we moved to our rural location 25+ years ago... We get in the neighborhood of 25 channels for free vs a satellite which would run over $100 per month.

Not all rural locations are equal. If I select the option of having a 30 feet tall antenna, I get a whopping 3 different stations.

Daley

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3871
  • Location: Cow country. Moo.
  • Got that mustache feeling.
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #9 on: December 20, 2017, 09:50:28 AM »
Not all rural locations are equal. If I select the option of having a 30 feet tall antenna, I get a whopping 3 different stations.

Actually, thanks to the additional benefit of all the digital sub-channels from those three broadcasters? You'd actually get ten whole channels: ABC, CBS, FOX, PBS, PBS World, PBS Kids, Create, Comet, Escape and Grit. Whoo!

Granted, even with diversity, there's more crap stations than good, but...
« Last Edit: December 20, 2017, 09:52:04 AM by Daley »

soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3380
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
    • My Journal
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #10 on: December 20, 2017, 09:50:36 AM »
Well in between all this I went and got a Digital Antenna. For 50$ I get two major city networks I am in between and holly molly why did I wait so long. This picture in some cases is better than cable was and I get over 60 channels!

Thanks all!

robartsd

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1752
  • Location: Northern California
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #11 on: December 20, 2017, 11:12:12 AM »
You can use the anntenaweb.org website to get a prediction of what channels you can get and what antenna you need.

I'm not sure who your internet provider is. If you're still getting internet access from the cable company, you'll need their cable hooked up to your modem/router, otherwise you can disconnect the cable input from the first splitter and connect your antenna there to use your existing wiring to get the antenna signal distributed to all your TVs. Of course splitting the signal weakens it, so you may want to add an amplifier before the splitter or choose a larger antenna. If your antenna is outside, be sure to ground it to reduce the risk of damaging your equipment.

There is no such thing as a "digital" or "high definition" antenna. Antennas are simply designed to pick up certain frequencies. Before digital TV, many of the most popular stations were on VHF channels 2-13, so antennas were designed to pick up these frequencies well. When digital HDTV came out, stations were allowed to add a digital signal on a UHF channel (digital channel numbers you select do not need to match the radio frequency used) and many antennas designed to pick up these channels were marketed as "digital" or "high definition" antennas. If some of your stations moved their digital signal to VHF frequencies after the transition, these antennas may be worse for getting their signal now than an old "analog" antanna. For me the two stations that moved their digital signals to VHF are the most difficult to receive because modern antennas are frequently designed primarily for UHF reception.

VHF antenna: Typically long linear horizontal elements perpendictular to the signal. The array of varied length elements that make up the triangular shape of traditional rooftop antennas and the FM radio like whips (FM radio is between VHF 6 and VHF 7, analog TV audio is FM radio) of traditional rabit ears are designed for VHF. Because the lowest frequency/longest wavelength channels were removed from broadcast TV, a VHF antenna designed after the 2009 digital transition can be significantly smaller for the same reception of the remaining channels.

UHF antenna: Usually a variation on a Yagi design (lots of short linear elements about the same lenght in a row pointing at the signal at the front of traditional rooftop antennas) or grid/loop that faces the signal (the loop on traditional rabit ears, various grid design "high definition" antennas).

Well in between all this I went and got a Digital Antenna. For 50$ I get two major city networks I am in between and holly molly why did I wait so long. This picture in some cases is better than cable was and I get over 60 channels!
Yes, the primary channel for most broadcast stations can be better than the cable signal for those stations.

Since you are between two major cities, you may be getting some channels that are not officially licensed to cover your area. The FCC may not protect your reception of these channels in the spectrum repacking that will start in Fall 2018.

HipGnosis

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1366
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #12 on: December 20, 2017, 11:18:05 AM »
With  over 60 channels you might want to get an OTA (Over The Antenna) DVR.  I got a Channel Master (brand) DVR+ (model) and a 1Tb HD.
I seldom watch 'live' TV just so I can FFwd thru the ads.

I've found the actual antenna doesn't matter as much as the location and position of it.  It's worse for me as my main electrical feed is on the outside of the wall my TV is on.

robartsd

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1752
  • Location: Northern California
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #13 on: December 20, 2017, 11:56:28 AM »
With  over 60 channels you might want to get an OTA (Over The Antenna) DVR.  I got a Channel Master (brand) DVR+ (model) and a 1Tb HD.
I seldom watch 'live' TV just so I can FFwd thru the ads.
I've been using a desktop computer for DVR for about 6 years. Currently I run MythTV on Debian Linux. I screen scrape tv listings from the web to get better program information than OTA EPG. I want to add additional tuners so that I can record multiple RF chanels at once.

Channel Master's Sream+ (replaces the DVR+) looks tempting ($99 special introductory price, ships by end of January).

Cadman

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 279
  • Location: Midwest
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #14 on: December 20, 2017, 12:43:50 PM »
In our area the majority of DTV OTA stations are in the UHF band, so having a bowtie or loop makes a huge difference over a VHF array. A quick check on a site like TVfool.com should be able to help for your location (and others with a similar dilemma).

One of the drawbacks of DTV is that you can no longer adjust your antenna with real-time feedback as the signal must buffer and stabilize first, and where a marginal analog signal was previously acceptable, it's now an all-or-nothing affair. Obviously, the onscreen signal meters help, but you're really in the dark if you're fighting signal reflections verse local noise interference verse a truly crappy signal.

If you're shopping for a set-top antenna, it's hard to go wrong with something like this for <$10. https://www.summitsource.com/RCA-ANT115-TV-Antenna-Indoor-Passive-with-Fine-Tuning-UHF-VHF-FM-Digital-HDTV-Indoor-HDTV-Antenna-Digital-MANT200-Tunable-Local-Channel-Signal-Aerial-with-Smart-Tuner-Part-MANT-200-P8495.aspx

soccerluvof4

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3380
  • Location: Artic Midwest
  • Retired at 50
    • My Journal
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #15 on: December 20, 2017, 01:13:59 PM »
You can use the anntenaweb.org website to get a prediction of what channels you can get and what antenna you need.

I'm not sure who your internet provider is. If you're still getting internet access from the cable company, you'll need their cable hooked up to your modem/router, otherwise you can disconnect the cable input from the first splitter and connect your antenna there to use your existing wiring to get the antenna signal distributed to all your TVs. Of course splitting the signal weakens it, so you may want to add an amplifier before the splitter or choose a larger antenna. If your antenna is outside, be sure to ground it to reduce the risk of damaging your equipment.

There is no such thing as a "digital" or "high definition" antenna. Antennas are simply designed to pick up certain frequencies. Before digital TV, many of the most popular stations were on VHF channels 2-13, so antennas were designed to pick up these frequencies well. When digital HDTV came out, stations were allowed to add a digital signal on a UHF channel (digital channel numbers you select do not need to match the radio frequency used) and many antennas designed to pick up these channels were marketed as "digital" or "high definition" antennas. If some of your stations moved their digital signal to VHF frequencies after the transition, these antennas may be worse for getting their signal now than an old "analog" antanna. For me the two stations that moved their digital signals to VHF are the most difficult to receive because modern antennas are frequently designed primarily for UHF reception.

VHF antenna: Typically long linear horizontal elements perpendictular to the signal. The array of varied length elements that make up the triangular shape of traditional rooftop antennas and the FM radio like whips (FM radio is between VHF 6 and VHF 7, analog TV audio is FM radio) of traditional rabit ears are designed for VHF. Because the lowest frequency/longest wavelength channels were removed from broadcast TV, a VHF antenna designed after the 2009 digital transition can be significantly smaller for the same reception of the remaining channels.

UHF antenna: Usually a variation on a Yagi design (lots of short linear elements about the same lenght in a row pointing at the signal at the front of traditional rooftop antennas) or grid/loop that faces the signal (the loop on traditional rabit ears, various grid design "high definition" antennas).

Well in between all this I went and got a Digital Antenna. For 50$ I get two major city networks I am in between and holly molly why did I wait so long. This picture in some cases is better than cable was and I get over 60 channels!
Yes, the primary channel for most broadcast stations can be better than the cable signal for those stations.

Since you are between two major cities, you may be getting some channels that are not officially licensed to cover your area. The FCC may not protect your reception of these channels in the spectrum repacking that will start in Fall 2018.




I used the antenneweb website your talking about, entered my zip code to see what I would get supposedly for channels. Of course they recommended a certain antenna but I went to Best buy down the road and bought a Clearstream 2max. Can be used indoor or outdoor and for once I got a sales associate that knew what they were talking about. I was shocked how many they had and was all focused on cable cutting. He asked me what town In the area I lived in because it does change drastically, woods, elevation etc.. and suggested the one I bought and told my why and charted it for me.  I actually live in between two cities one close to a million people with surrounding area and the other 600,000 and only 80 miles from one over 2million. I am pulling at least one channel from there. I set it up to see how it would work right next to the TV but am for sure going to try other placements.

robartsd

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1752
  • Location: Northern California
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #16 on: December 20, 2017, 01:24:12 PM »
A quick check on a site like TVfool.com should be able to help for your location (and others with a similar dilemma).
I forgot about TVfool.com. It is a bit more nerdy and much less advertising than antennaWeb.

WhiteTrashCash

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1242
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #17 on: December 20, 2017, 02:12:33 PM »
If you have Windows 7, I think you can simply run your antenna through Windows Media Center and use your computer as a tuner and DVR without any extra equipment. It's probably worth looking into. I just use a Channel Master DVR+ with dual tuner because it was a gift.

GuitarStv

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 11850
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #18 on: December 20, 2017, 02:31:02 PM »
If you're going with a set top antenna, make your own.  I've been using the pietenna for a couple years now and it works great.  https://lifehacker.com/5976689/the-pietenna-hd-antenna-looks-terrible-but-gets-great-signal

robartsd

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1752
  • Location: Northern California
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2017, 04:13:19 PM »
If you have Windows 7, I think you can simply run your antenna through Windows Media Center and use your computer as a tuner and DVR without any extra equipment. It's probably worth looking into. I just use a Channel Master DVR+ with dual tuner because it was a gift.
Windows Media Center in Vista was the DVR software I used first (I got a computer at a thrift store for other reasons that happened to include a TV tuner - the computer came with Vista, but I chose to upgrade to Linux instead of buying Windows 7).

Of course DVR software included with Windows is only helpful if you have tuner to connect your antenna to (most computers do not). A dual tuner card is not that much less than the Channel Master Stream+'s current promotional price, and is probably even easier than installing a tuner card and setting up Windows Media Center (also likely to be more energy efficient than leaving a desktop conputer on 24/7).

If you're going with a set top antenna, make your own.  I've been using the pietenna for a couple years now and it works great.  https://lifehacker.com/5976689/the-pietenna-hd-antenna-looks-terrible-but-gets-great-signal
I doubt that design works well for VHF channels. There are a lot of DIY antennas that work well for UHF, VHF designs seem to be few and far between (I think because the wavelengths are longer and only a few channels are still on VHF - in some areas none).

sisto

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 870
  • Age: 49
  • Location: Sacramento, CA
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #20 on: December 20, 2017, 05:02:57 PM »
I have 1 antenna on the roof and feed 4 tv's from it using the existing old cable wiring. You just need to amplify the signal, you can get one that just makes sure you correct the loss of the splitter.

Lulee

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 166
  • Location: NH
  • "We'll jump off that bridge when we come to it."
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #21 on: December 20, 2017, 06:23:07 PM »
A little over a year ago a storm finished off my mother's old roof top antenna which had been ravaged by time and tree limbs (it looked like a half plucked chicken when my brother hauled it to the dump).  We replaced it with this one from Amazon which I selected after lots of reading online https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01HS8RR9I/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It's been brilliant for her, pulling in way more channels than we thought she'd get given the hills and mountains all around her.  One thing it eliminated was a weird static effect the old one had where something would occasionally override the signal of stations for 15 minutes or so every so often.  We paired it with a rotor which she hardly uses (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008468PWC/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1) but as the old one needed it to pick up signals from specific directions, we thought she needed it as well.

Our local TV shop in Keene is closing due to the owner retiring but Rich stopped by to check it out in case the occasional customer he still helps out wants to replace their old one with something that works well.  I'd had to get some new cable from him (although the old antenna bracket still worked fine or I'd have gotten it from him as well) and I told him all about this one and the good info I'd read on it online.

Cable's not an option for her and too expensive.  And a satellite dish system is more money she can't afford.  A roof top antenna is her only choice.  And now she can watch reruns of Gunsmoke during her lunch which makes her a very happy camper indeed!

GuitarStv

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 11850
  • Age: 37
  • Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #22 on: December 21, 2017, 07:18:34 AM »
If you have Windows 7, I think you can simply run your antenna through Windows Media Center and use your computer as a tuner and DVR without any extra equipment. It's probably worth looking into. I just use a Channel Master DVR+ with dual tuner because it was a gift.
Windows Media Center in Vista was the DVR software I used first (I got a computer at a thrift store for other reasons that happened to include a TV tuner - the computer came with Vista, but I chose to upgrade to Linux instead of buying Windows 7).

Of course DVR software included with Windows is only helpful if you have tuner to connect your antenna to (most computers do not). A dual tuner card is not that much less than the Channel Master Stream+'s current promotional price, and is probably even easier than installing a tuner card and setting up Windows Media Center (also likely to be more energy efficient than leaving a desktop conputer on 24/7).

If you're going with a set top antenna, make your own.  I've been using the pietenna for a couple years now and it works great.  https://lifehacker.com/5976689/the-pietenna-hd-antenna-looks-terrible-but-gets-great-signal
I doubt that design works well for VHF channels. There are a lot of DIY antennas that work well for UHF, VHF designs seem to be few and far between (I think because the wavelengths are longer and only a few channels are still on VHF - in some areas none).

I pick up the VHF channels for this area with it  . . . but they all have a pretty high signal strength, so you might well be right.

lthenderson

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1139
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #23 on: December 21, 2017, 08:36:14 AM »
Not all rural locations are equal. If I select the option of having a 30 feet tall antenna, I get a whopping 3 different stations.

Actually, thanks to the additional benefit of all the digital sub-channels from those three broadcasters? You'd actually get ten whole channels: ABC, CBS, FOX, PBS, PBS World, PBS Kids, Create, Comet, Escape and Grit. Whoo!

Granted, even with diversity, there's more crap stations than good, but...

Actually if you read the graphic there are only five channels with the benefit of sub-channels and from trying it awhile back when I first moved here, that was optimistic. I could only pull in the local Fox station and three PBS channels. Not a very diverse lineup which is why I currently subscribe to cable.

robartsd

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1752
  • Location: Northern California
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #24 on: December 21, 2017, 11:01:07 AM »
Actually if you read the graphic there are only five channels with the benefit of sub-channels and from trying it awhile back when I first moved here, that was optimistic. I could only pull in the local Fox station and three PBS channels. Not a very diverse lineup which is why I currently subscribe to cable.
I don't understand why some stations choose not to have any subchannels. I know that many subchannels limit the quality of the primary channel, but adding one or two SD subchannels does not result in a noticable loss on the HD channel. In your situation, it would take a signficant investment to get your ABC channel. While that would be a significant additon to a lineup with only Fox and PBS, I can see where the value proposition fails when you compare to subscription services.

I'm guessing you live in a hilly rural area. I imagine that your area had lots of big satelite dishes a couple of decades ago - you can still get a lot of free to air TV with a big ugly dish. There is some FTA available on Ku band (3' dish) satelites, but most of the english FTA programing is news/shopping/religious in that band (notable exception is PBS, but you get that locally).

lthenderson

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1139
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #25 on: December 22, 2017, 07:26:08 AM »
I'm guessing you live in a hilly rural area. I imagine that your area had lots of big satelite dishes a couple of decades ago

Yes and yes. Also live in the poorest county in the state so there isn't a lot of incentive for companies to come in and change things. All the big satellite dishes have been replaced with the smaller versions. In order to keep costs low, I switch between the dish and the local hardwired cable service about every two years so I can jump back to the introductory rates. Doing that I can keep my rates not to far away from those that subscribe to all those a la carte streaming services.

CowboyAndIndian

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1255
  • Location: NJ, USA
    • KOWines: Deep discount wine/spirits store.
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #26 on: December 22, 2017, 09:41:05 AM »

robartsd

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1752
  • Location: Northern California
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #27 on: December 22, 2017, 10:40:42 AM »
The small dish satelites are mostly encrypted subscription service feeds, but most of the broadcast TV networks provide unencrypted feeds on frequencies that require a large dish. Non-religious, non-shopping, english, high definition networks available free to air with a C-band (big dish) system include:
  • ABC
  • CBS
  • Classic Arts Showcase
  • The CW
  • FOX
  • ION
  • Live Well Network
  • Me TV
  • My Network TV
  • NASA
  • NBC
  • Outside TV
  • PBS
  • Reelz Channel
« Last Edit: December 26, 2017, 08:51:27 AM by robartsd »

Daley

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3871
  • Location: Cow country. Moo.
  • Got that mustache feeling.
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #28 on: December 23, 2017, 08:14:41 PM »
Not all rural locations are equal. If I select the option of having a 30 feet tall antenna, I get a whopping 3 different stations.

Actually, thanks to the additional benefit of all the digital sub-channels from those three broadcasters? You'd actually get ten whole channels: ABC, CBS, FOX, PBS, PBS World, PBS Kids, Create, Comet, Escape and Grit. Whoo!

Granted, even with diversity, there's more crap stations than good, but...

Actually if you read the graphic there are only five channels with the benefit of sub-channels and from trying it awhile back when I first moved here, that was optimistic. I could only pull in the local Fox station and three PBS channels. Not a very diverse lineup which is why I currently subscribe to cable.

I pulled the subchannel broadcast lineup from the FCC, and regional TitanTV guide listings. Whatever website your graphic came from is a bit dated. If you can actually receive KYOU-DT, KTVO-DT, and K18GU-D, you should get those ten stations I outlined in my first reply to you. Honest. :)

robartsd

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1752
  • Location: Northern California
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #29 on: December 26, 2017, 09:06:19 AM »
I pulled the subchannel broadcast lineup from the FCC, and regional TitanTV guide listings. Whatever website your graphic came from is a bit dated. If you can actually receive KYOU-DT, KTVO-DT, and K18GU-D, you should get those ten stations I outlined in my first reply to you. Honest. :)
That's interesting that KTVO carries two major networks in HD: ABC (720p) and CBS (1080i). For more variety they also air Coment TV (480i). Not an easy station to pull in based on the image posted, but much more worthwhile than if it was broadcasting only ABC.

Daley

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3871
  • Location: Cow country. Moo.
  • Got that mustache feeling.
Re: Antenna for TV
« Reply #30 on: December 26, 2017, 09:42:44 AM »
I pulled the subchannel broadcast lineup from the FCC, and regional TitanTV guide listings. Whatever website your graphic came from is a bit dated. If you can actually receive KYOU-DT, KTVO-DT, and K18GU-D, you should get those ten stations I outlined in my first reply to you. Honest. :)
That's interesting that KTVO carries two major networks in HD: ABC (720p) and CBS (1080i). For more variety they also air Coment TV (480i). Not an easy station to pull in based on the image posted, but much more worthwhile than if it was broadcasting only ABC.

You think that's interesting, you should check out the two major commercial TV broadcasters in the "Texoma" region of Oklahoma/Texas (the region covering Sherman/Denison, TX and Ada/Ardmore OK). Between KTEN and KXII, you can currently get no less than five major networks in HD, and one off-brand in SD. KTEN broadcasts NBC, ABC, and the CW, and KXII broadcasts CBS, Fox and MyNetwork. It's a little trippy, especially during the news hours on KTEN.

These two network's histories are especially intriguing, as as far back as I can remember into my childhood, both had varying levels of multi-network syndication with their single analog channels. During a period in the mid-90's alone, you could get a schizophrenic mix of ABC, NBC and Fox programming all in one day on KTEN.