Author Topic: Stoicism and College Applications  (Read 2263 times)

Geostache

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Stoicism and College Applications
« on: April 29, 2016, 07:44:04 AM »
I wasn't sure if this was the best place to post this, but figured it was as close. I heard this article on NPR this morning:

http://www.npr.org/2016/04/29/476124540/what-to-do-when-youre-stuck-on-a-college-waitlist

It occurred to me that many of these college applicants today have a lot of their self-worth wrapped up into college acceptance. It seems to me like it's a good opportunity to flex some stoic muscles. Instead of thinking of themselves as 'failures' for being put on a wait list, they should re-frame the problem in terms of things that are within their control, not in their control, and partially in control. I can only hope to instill some of this in my kids when the time comes. I don't want them getting depressed because they were put on some (arguably arbitrary) college wait list.


stoaX

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Re: Stoicism and College Applications
« Reply #1 on: April 29, 2016, 01:06:49 PM »
I must've been born without normal human emotions.  I applied to 4 colleges and was rejected by 2.  I never even thought about the rejections, just went about deciding which of the other 2 colleges to go to.  I suppose being wait-listed would've added a layer of complexity to the decision making....

And thanks for posting - any post that says "flexing stoic muscles" gets a thumbs up from me!

seattlecyclone

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Re: Stoicism and College Applications
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2016, 10:04:12 AM »
I was pretty bummed about not getting into my top choice school when I was 18. But then I went to a college that did accept me and had a great experience. It's important to keep some perspective about these things.
I made a blog! https://seattlecyclone.com/

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