Author Topic: Start your own urban tribe  (Read 4077 times)

yolfer

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Start your own urban tribe
« on: August 23, 2015, 10:14:26 PM »
MMM's latest blog post got me thinking about how to facilitate a tribe in my area. Seattle is pretty big and dense. While I know my immediate neighbors, I'm sure there are 100s of other Mustachians (or soon-to-be-Mustachians) within biking distance.

It would be inefficient going door-to-door to meet them all, so I set up a facebook group to try to recruit like-minded folks:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/seattletribe/

I'm modeling it after the Buy Nothing project, where folks can either find an Urban Tribe in their area, or start a new one.

So on the off chance you leave near me, you should join this FB group! If you know someone in Seattle, please send that link to them. Otherwise, start one up in your own area! Let's see how much of the urban world we can cover.

marty998

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Re: Start your own urban tribe
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2015, 01:31:25 AM »
I'm near Seattle!!! (on a cosmic scale).

Have to say this was a brilliant post by MMM. Encapsulated everything that is good about the way of life.


velocistar237

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Re: Start your own urban tribe
« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2015, 11:55:58 AM »
The Boston folks have a Google group.
https://groups.google.com/d/forum/boston-mustachians

KMMK

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Re: Start your own urban tribe
« Reply #3 on: August 24, 2015, 12:23:38 PM »
I've been working on this since I quit my corporate job. And I did start a FB group, for my area - Winnipeg, MB. So far I have 17 members of my FB group plus myself (only 2 people of which I knew in real life beforehand), and have met 4 people in real life that I probably wouldn't have met otherwise. I'm hoping to plan more activities soon and keep meeting local, like-minded people. I just love being able to have honest conversations without worrying about what I say or people looking at me strangely. It's also great being able to just reference things like FI or YMOYL without further explanation needed.

Alchemilla

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Re: Start your own urban tribe
« Reply #4 on: August 24, 2015, 12:51:25 PM »
Thanks for the link. There is a "buy nothing" group in my neighbouring county.
Blog at smallholdingsister.com

hoping2retire35

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Re: Start your own urban tribe
« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2017, 01:56:55 PM »
Disappointing this thread never caught on. Been thinking a lot about this lately.

131071

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Re: Start your own urban tribe
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2017, 08:54:42 AM »
Have any Mustachians participated in or given thought to the parallels with Cohousing? (http://cohousing.org)

The notion of living in smaller footprints, sharing more resources among groups of like-minded people, focusing time and effort on improving the community are all compatible with many of Pete Adeney's goals.  This may be an easy way to bring about mini "urban tribes" in cities across the globe.  From Cohousing.org:

Quote
Cohousing is an intentional community of private homes clustered around shared space. Each attached or single family home has traditional amenities, including a private kitchen. Shared spaces typically feature a common house, which may include a large kitchen and dining area, laundry, and recreational spaces. Shared outdoor space may include parking, walkways, open space, and gardens. Neighbors also share resources like tools and lawnmowers.

Households have independent incomes and private lives, but neighbors collaboratively plan and manage community activities and shared spaces. The legal structure is typically an HOA, Condo Association, or Housing Cooperative. Community activities feature regularly-scheduled shared meals, meetings, and workdays. Neighbors gather for parties, games, movies, or other events. Cohousing makes it easy to form clubs, organize child and elder care, and carpool.

See this webpage for a cohousing example in Portland, OR.  They have communal tool libraries, small gyms/yoga studios, bicycle workshops, guest housing, and a large diining facility: http://www.daybreakcohousing.org/SiteandDesign.html

I've read a bit about studies that have shown reduced consumption of electricity, less production of waste, and communities sharing cars in Cohousing scenarios. 

If you're interested in learning more in podcast form, here's an Urban Planning Professor from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte discussing the basics: https://ui.uncc.edu/story/cohousing-podcast-robert-boyer-uncc.  I'd be interested to hear experiences from any Mustachians who have tried this - I'd love to see a community begin here. 

EfficientN

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Re: Start your own urban tribe
« Reply #7 on: March 21, 2017, 12:53:36 PM »
Have any Mustachians participated in or given thought to the parallels with Cohousing? (http://cohousing.org)

The notion of living in smaller footprints, sharing more resources among groups of like-minded people, focusing time and effort on improving the community are all compatible with many of Pete Adeney's goals.  This may be an easy way to bring about mini "urban tribes" in cities across the globe.  From Cohousing.org:

Quote
Cohousing is an intentional community of private homes clustered around shared space. Each attached or single family home has traditional amenities, including a private kitchen. Shared spaces typically feature a common house, which may include a large kitchen and dining area, laundry, and recreational spaces. Shared outdoor space may include parking, walkways, open space, and gardens. Neighbors also share resources like tools and lawnmowers.

Households have independent incomes and private lives, but neighbors collaboratively plan and manage community activities and shared spaces. The legal structure is typically an HOA, Condo Association, or Housing Cooperative. Community activities feature regularly-scheduled shared meals, meetings, and workdays. Neighbors gather for parties, games, movies, or other events. Cohousing makes it easy to form clubs, organize child and elder care, and carpool.

See this webpage for a cohousing example in Portland, OR.  They have communal tool libraries, small gyms/yoga studios, bicycle workshops, guest housing, and a large diining facility: http://www.daybreakcohousing.org/SiteandDesign.html

I've read a bit about studies that have shown reduced consumption of electricity, less production of waste, and communities sharing cars in Cohousing scenarios. 

If you're interested in learning more in podcast form, here's an Urban Planning Professor from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte discussing the basics: https://ui.uncc.edu/story/cohousing-podcast-robert-boyer-uncc.  I'd be interested to hear experiences from any Mustachians who have tried this - I'd love to see a community begin here.

I've seen a few companies in NYC talk about something similar. In every single presentation, the first questions are about affordability, and each of them concede they can manage no cheaper than market rate. I think that isn't the point for these co-living firms, but I'd love to see an affordable version.