Author Topic: New Position Considerations  (Read 768 times)

Treb3

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New Position Considerations
« on: July 21, 2018, 05:54:03 AM »
First, thank you for your help!  I am looking for validation OR thoughts about where/how my decision-making is lacking.

So, I currently work in a beautiful state that I love but am highly allergic to.  I have no support system here; I ended up here as a result of a convoluted work/relationship history.  My family lives 6 hours away and my boyfriend lives 2 hours away.  I make $75,000+ as a hospice director.  I am highly stressed out.  Due to poor company policy, we are always understaffed and overworked.  Substantial bonuses that were promised during the interview process have been cut.  About half of the people at my level have left in the last 7 months; about half of the nurses have as well.  When I took this position, I explicitly stated that I was looking for an 8-5 and not to be on call.  I actually took a significant pay cut to take this position because I thought it was going to be a) a huge improvement in work/life balance; b) stable; and 3) the type of work I want to do.  Instead, I am constantly working overtime, eating lunch while working, looking for staffing help out of hours, dealing with patient crises, and have interrupted sleep due to calls/emergencies. It's hard for me to even go to yoga or go canoeing because I have to be available.  I am overwhelmed by the need and lack of staffing and know that I need to quit.   I also feel terrible because my nurses have a horrible work/life balance and there's little I can do about it.  I have been in a few high-stress jobs in a row--that's why I thought I was getting a lower stress job with this one and instead it's the worst job I've ever had.  Coworkers are wonderful and patients are great and the work 80% suits me but Corporate policies and treatment of staff are beyond poor.  I almost walked out and quit my position a few times in the last few months.  It was that bad.  Only my sense of responsibility stopped me.

I have an interview in my hometown.  I will be 15 minutes from a good portion of my family and 6 hours from my boyfriend.  The company is a Fortune 100 Best Companies to Work For.  My sister has worked there for 4 years and loves it.  However--it is an entry level job in a call center that pays $30,000/yr with great benefits.  I may have to take a non-traditional shift (i.e., 40 consistent hours but not necessarily 8-5, M-F).  I am really tempted by this because I know that I really am operating on the edge and need to get out.  I'm not a crier but am crying all the time at home and forgetting things and my physical health is suffering.  I will need to get a side job or get overtime to do this because really I need to make $38,000/yr to be comfortable.  My savings rate and lifestyle will plummet of course, but I really think it may be worth it.  It makes me feel better to tell myself that I'm viewing it as a sabbatical.  If I give it 2 years, hopefully I will move up to an analyst position that makes $75,000 per year (that I am not fully qualified for now but don't really have time to prep for because my job has currently taken over my life; but I have skills/talents/experience in that direction).  I do like this field and would enjoy making it a career.  And at least regain my mental/physical health.  Or in 2 years I can try to do something more lucrative if I haven't moved up at all with this new company.  It is a risk also because it will be outside of my current field -- will I be able to get back in if I want to later?  I have applied for positions in my field in my (smallish) hometown but have not yet had any responses.  I am also wary of a healthcare job, even if they promise a good work/life balance, because that's what I thought I was getting in this position.  My degree is in healthcare management -- I can't do anything clinical.  And it will cause complications with my relationship with my boyfriend due to the increased distance, but he says he is supportive of what I need to do.   

Am I crazy for considering this?  I am almost 33, have been in high stress positions for the last 5 years, have lived away from the hometown for the past 10 years, have $280,000 in retirement accounts, $70,000 in liquid accounts, no debt, rent an apartment.  Car is 8 years old and has 150,000 miles on it. 

In general I like to work and could see myself working for another 20 years if I'm not stressed out and the hours are reasonable.  Working like I am now -- I can't see myself surviving in the workforce for another 2 years, much less 20.

They haven't offered me the position yet, but I want to feel good about it before the interview.  I do interviews myself in my current job and can always tell (and don't hire) people who aren't sure if they want the position.

cap396

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Re: New Position Considerations
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2018, 06:21:58 AM »
My opinion: It's more important to have a job you enjoy than a job that pays well.  No amount of money is worth risking a mental breakdown due to job stress.  I would really try to reflect on what the new job has to offer (in terms of reduced stress) over your current job, which from reading your post it seems like you've already done this reflecting.  If the new job offers the opportunity to reduce the stress and the physical harm you're experiencing, then I think it is well worth the pay cut.  But if it's going to be just as stressful, then why switch?  Unfortunately you won't know what the true stress level of the new job would be until you actually start working that job.  But based on your description, I'd say you're better off with the new job.

My wife had a high-stress job that sounds very similar to your current job.  The stress was deteriorating her physical and mental health.  She FIRE'd about a month ago, and she is a whole new person.  The pros of leaving her job far outweigh the loss of income.

lhamo

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Re: New Position Considerations
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2018, 03:33:07 PM »
It sounds like getting back to hometown would be good for you, regardless of whether or not you take this particular job.  YOu are being set up to fail in the current job.  I understand not wanting to leave your colleagues in the lurch, but that is really a management problem because they have put you in an unsustainable position.  I would resign immediately.

I'm curious, though.  Why not move where BF is and look for a job there?  You have a 70k emergency stash -- that gives you 2 years of runway, at least (more if your housing costs go down)

pbkmaine

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Re: New Position Considerations
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2018, 07:45:16 PM »
It sounds like getting back to hometown would be good for you, regardless of whether or not you take this particular job.  YOu are being set up to fail in the current job.  I understand not wanting to leave your colleagues in the lurch, but that is really a management problem because they have put you in an unsustainable position.  I would resign immediately.

I'm curious, though.  Why not move where BF is and look for a job there?  You have a 70k emergency stash -- that gives you 2 years of runway, at least (more if your housing costs go down)

I’m with lhamo. Yes, definitely quit the job. Monday morning. But take your time looking for a new one. Look around. Call center jobs are stressful, too. I used to run one.

JGS1980

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Re: New Position Considerations
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2018, 08:37:31 PM »
Quit yesterday.

Don't let your company use your morals against you when they have none themselves. If they had morals, they would not understaff their business or cut promised bonuses or sell you on a false set of work responsibilities.

You have FU money for this exact situation. Time to use it.

JGS

reeshau

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Re: New Position Considerations
« Reply #5 on: July 22, 2018, 01:58:40 AM »
It sounds like getting back to hometown would be good for you, regardless of whether or not you take this particular job.  YOu are being set up to fail in the current job.  I understand not wanting to leave your colleagues in the lurch, but that is really a management problem because they have put you in an unsustainable position.  I would resign immediately.

I'm curious, though.  Why not move where BF is and look for a job there?  You have a 70k emergency stash -- that gives you 2 years of runway, at least (more if your housing costs go down)

Iím with lhamo. Yes, definitely quit the job. Monday morning. But take your time looking for a new one. Look around. Call center jobs are stressful, too. I used to run one.

I can only wholeheartedly agree here.  While I think it was a little naive to think you could take a director position and still work 8-5, more typically the case would be "Work sucks, but I can't walk away from the salary and huge bonus."  In this case, you are getting neither.

But it seems you are looking for a "rebound job."  I wouldn't rush into it.  Take a *real* sabbatical, and use the time to do some professional networking, in your hometown or bf's hometown.  The call center job will always be there--they have high turnover.  But any decisions you make now will be under a lot of stress, so probably not ideal.  Don't jump to your next mistake; get a little separation from this hellhole.

Treb3

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Re: New Position Considerations
« Reply #6 on: July 22, 2018, 06:09:12 AM »
Thank you all so much!!

Treb3

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Re: New Position Considerations
« Reply #7 on: July 22, 2018, 06:21:05 AM »
I can't tell you how valuable it is to me to get this confirmation! I think that maybe I have been so focused on having money set aside to get me out of bad situations that I forget that it's okay to use it! Or to at least stop adding to it temporarily. Again, my thanks to everyone for their input.

former player

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Re: New Position Considerations
« Reply #8 on: July 22, 2018, 06:37:24 AM »
I agree with others that you should quit the current job - your post strongly suggests to me someone who is overwhelmed with stress and hasn't taken a deep breath in weeks, and so is unable to think clearly.

One thing you have not said in your post is what the notice requirements for your current job are?  Were you proposing to give any notice?  If you do work a notice period, I would be clear with whoever you give notice to that during the notice period you will only be working your agreed hours of 8 - 5 Monday to Friday and that you will be notifying all contacts that any matters arising out of those hours will be responded to in the first instance by "[your boss/person to whom you are giving notice/head of the organisation] whose contact details are as follows".

After that, I wonder why you think you need £38k a year to be comfortable?   When you are away from your current situation can you reassess that according to mustachian principles?

Given a bad history of moves relating to work and relationships, I think it makes a lot of sense for you at this point in your life to prioritise location over other things.    But that does mean at some point when you are calmer and more in control having a talk with your boyfriend about where things are between you.


Good luck on Monday.