Author Topic: Will this person pay me?  (Read 10778 times)

MonkeyJenga

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Will this person pay me?
« on: June 18, 2015, 07:43:06 PM »
Background

I am trying to develop a personal finance coaching business, targeted towards women in NYC in their 20's and 30's with student loans or consumer debt. The focus is on the emotional and psychological side of spending, with practical tips to overcome their biggest hurdles. My initial plan before going after paying clients was to gather 3 test cases and testimonials. I have three ongoing pro bono clients, who are all friends, and I've been honing my process with them. My format is going to be:

1) A free 15-minute phone call to assess whether I'm right for the client.
2) A $50, hour-long introductory session that will include follow-up research and documentation from me. This will likely include a guaranteed way to find them more than the fee in either easily cut spending or a targeted credit card bonus.
3) Ongoing email contact, and monthly meetings if desired. All future meetings will be $50/hr and quick emails will be free.

I became friendly with a woman I met at a Freelancer's Union event a few weeks ago. I helped her out with a free session, and she sent me a testimonial afterwards. I also plan on asking her for feedback on my Facebook page once it's set up, since I took a look at her website at the same meeting. When we had previously discussed me using her digital marketing skills, she mentioned rates for specific services, but we mutually decided I didn't need her yet. I had debated asking her for payment for our session, but ultimately didn't bring it up. I like her, put her in contact with a friend she might visit in Central America, and think we'll legitimately be friends once she gets back from traveling.

Main Question

She sent me an email today saying she told her sister how much I helped her, and her sister is interested in chatting with me. Can she connect us? Payment isn't mentioned.

My first thought was "AWESOME!" I really did help her if she's talking to other people about me. Then I considered the money question.

I don't technically need income yet from this side gig, since I still have my 9-to-5, but at some point I need to pull the trigger and talk rates with real-live people. I have 4 clients, a solid grasp on how my meetings will go, and now a referral. How should I handle this? Agree to yet another pro bono client, or politely let her know that I'm done with pro bono and want some skrilla? Charge my full price, or offer a reduced rate?

My current plan is to respond with something like this:

Quote
I'd love to speak with her, and I'm so glad to hear I helped you enough that you told your sister about me! Since I am full-up on pro bono clients, I'd like to follow my standard process with her. We can have a 15-minute phone call to assess whether I can really help her, and if so, schedule an in-person meeting for one hour. The fee for the hour-long session would be $50 and include follow-up research and documentation from me, as well as an assessment of the best rewards credit card for her, which should easily net her more than the payment.

Let me know if this plan is workable for her. If she doesn't feel comfortable with the fee, I'm definitely open to having the phone conversation and helping her out as much as possible in that setting.

You're almost in S-Am! I'm vicariously excited for you.

A funny detail: we met at an event on how to set and negotiate rates. We workshopped this sort of thing together, and now I feel strange putting it into practice with her.

kewper

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #1 on: June 18, 2015, 08:07:33 PM »
Honestly, I would never advise some to pay you for this service. 

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #2 on: June 18, 2015, 08:09:38 PM »
Try it.

Frankies Girl

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #3 on: June 18, 2015, 08:18:28 PM »
How about saying the first part about the free 15 minute phone consult, and that your normal rate for the hour long intro session is $50, but your "friend"  or "referral" fee is discounted to $40... with the monthly meetings to be $50/hr after that?

I think you're going to get most of your business through word of mouth and referrals, and everyone loves a bargain so offering a referral discount is an easy way to show you're interested in new business.

I get that you don't need the money, but you shouldn't sell yourself too short on developing your business... you need to make money for your time. Offering a service like this for no money cheapens the ideas you're explaining to many people (in their eyes) as they are used to paying money for services rendered. Pricing it at a slight discount makes them feel like they're getting a deal; giving it away might lessen the impact of the lessons.


MonkeyJenga

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #4 on: June 18, 2015, 08:24:13 PM »
Honestly, I would never advise some to pay you for this service.

Can you elaborate on why? You're the first person who's had a strong negative reaction, and the whole reason I want to move quickly away from pro bono sessions is to figure out if people will actually pay me. If not, I can move on to another idea without a lot of wasted time.

Try it.

Alright!

How about saying the first part about the free 15 minute phone consult, and that your normal rate for the hour long intro session is $50, but your "friend"  or "referral" fee is discounted to $40... with the monthly meetings to be $50/hr after that?

I think you're going to get most of your business through word of mouth and referrals, and everyone loves a bargain so offering a referral discount is an easy way to show you're interested in new business.

I get that you don't need the money, but you shouldn't sell yourself too short on developing your business... you need to make money for your time. Offering a service like this for no money cheapens the ideas you're explaining to many people (in their eyes) as they are used to paying money for services rendered. Pricing it at a slight discount makes them feel like they're getting a deal; giving it away might lessen the impact of the lessons.

I like this idea a lot, thank you!

asiljoy

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #5 on: June 18, 2015, 08:36:20 PM »
Especially since you're guaranteeing them savings beyond your fee, I wouldn't have any problems sending financially illiterate friends to you. If you haven't ever paid attention to finances, it's overwhelming and figuring out who to read or what to trust is daunting. Sadly, I don't know anyone in New York.

I really like Frankie Girl's referral bonus idea. It eases you into asking to get paid, and it really takes away any awkwardness from the situation by still giving a 'deal' to a friend.

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2015, 09:10:27 PM »
Especially since you're guaranteeing them savings beyond your fee, I wouldn't have any problems sending financially illiterate friends to you. If you haven't ever paid attention to finances, it's overwhelming and figuring out who to read or what to trust is daunting. Sadly, I don't know anyone in New York.

I really like Frankie Girl's referral bonus idea. It eases you into asking to get paid, and it really takes away any awkwardness from the situation by still giving a 'deal' to a friend.

Thanks for the encouragement. This is not at all helpful for anyone on this forum, it's designed for people who may not even know their full financial picture because they're afraid to dig into it. I've read about the rule that your target clientele needs to be both willing and able to pay, and am fully aware that people in debt are a tough sell without clear financial benefits. One of my friends, after one meeting, cut her food/booze spending by more than $400 a month. Pretty crazy.

I agree that Frankie Girl's suggestion looks like the best way to go.

Cwadda

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2015, 09:16:55 PM »
I want to do this when I'm FIRE. It's a ways away but I want to be a personal finance coach/fiduciary type to get people on track. Don't know how much I'd end up charging, if anything.

I don't see anything wrong with charging. I guess once they're fully in control, they will say they are ready to be on their own and not spend more money? :D

StockBeard

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2015, 11:49:22 AM »
Honestly, I would never advise some to pay you for this service.
Elaborate, otherwise you're just trolling

MetalCap

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #9 on: June 19, 2015, 11:54:53 AM »
I think if you're under 10 total clients then you may want to consider a reduced rate or free but make sure they know that in the future they or others will be paying you.  The last thing you want is to stop the flow of new clients so upfront discussions are key to set expectations.

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #10 on: June 19, 2015, 12:21:00 PM »
I don't see anything wrong with charging. I guess once they're fully in control, they will say they are ready to be on their own and not spend more money? :D

Haha, yes, I hope sooner rather than later my clients stop needing me.

I think if you're under 10 total clients then you may want to consider a reduced rate or free but make sure they know that in the future they or others will be paying you.  The last thing you want is to stop the flow of new clients so upfront discussions are key to set expectations.

Thanks for the suggestion. I ended up saying I'd be happy to have the free phone consult, and I would give a reduced rate of $40 for the initial meeting. Haven't heard back yet, but worst case I never hear from her again. Disappointing but not the end of the world.

I think I'll try word of mouthing it among friends and let them know that my next 5 clients can get in at a reduced rate. $30 to $40, depending on the reaction I get to this latest email. I know it's important to build up some experience/testimonials.

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2015, 12:36:08 PM »
I've ran 2 side gigs while working full time since 1994. Your time is worth money period. It is a business. I always charge my overtime rate for consulting work 1.5x. I do technical IT work so the market will bear that and then some. Over the years that rate has escalated nicely. It is cut and dry for me. I've never advertised, side gig work ebbs and flows and many times I have to turn people away as there is only so much of me available if I still want to have a life outside of working and side gigs.

I advise you to embrace your value to your customers, don't feel bad, or stress about it, be proud of your rate!

Now your are doing financial consulting and my strategy might not work for you if that field's rate is quite a bit less.


Bicycle_B

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2015, 01:44:10 PM »
OP,

What you do is up to you.  If your advice extends into the investing realm, though, learn the rules about giving investment advice - it's a regulated field, therefore you have to do it right or face penalties such as lawsuits or even (worst case) criminal charges.  I'm not sure what the regulations are regarding consumer advice, but if there are any, they are probably triggered by charging a fee.  MMM would be exempt because he doesn't charge; you might be on the hook.

Separate item - here's another idea on how to price, sell and complete your service (no charge for this idea).  You could offer "10% of a year's savings, minimum $50/hour".  Then you list the savings that you found, calculated over one year.  It's up to them whether they use your service for more hours or just pay the $50/per hour that you charged at first. In the rare event you can't find $500/hour in savings for them to implement, take the tiny rate reduction as a marketing expense and feel good you stayed in the high-value-for-customer realm.  Make sure your contract states they are responsible for implementing the suggestions, or specifies that ideas you present within agreed areas (different credit card, for example) are a legitimate basis for the saving calculation. 

Perhaps you could offer the 10% as an alternative to the $50/hour, and let them choose up front.  Then you might make more than $50/hour!

Good luck.

Dicey

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2015, 01:51:00 PM »
I'm not sure what your 9-5 job is, but please be sure you are not going to run afoul of any licensing requirements by charging for financial advice.

Kaspian

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2015, 02:32:03 PM »
I'm not sure what your 9-5 job is, but please be sure you are not going to run afoul of any licensing requirements by charging for financial advice.

^^ What Diane says!   You need to make sure you have some sort of Certified Financial Planner credentials to do this before you get into any hot water.  Do you have the CFP certification?

ROY2007

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2015, 02:50:08 PM »
I've been interested in this as a potential side hustle as well. Following...

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #16 on: June 19, 2015, 03:02:14 PM »
I appreciate all the warnings. I think I'm safe, though. I don't have a CFP license, but I'm only going to focus on the spending side of things, not hand out any investment advice. And when I looked into it, pretty much anyone can call themselves a financial advisor, as long as they don't misrepresent themselves as having a certification.

Edited to clarify that I am not even calling myself a financial advisor, just a budget helper.

BarrettSun, I may graciously steal that pricing idea, thank you.
« Last Edit: June 19, 2015, 03:23:00 PM by MonkeyJenga »

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #17 on: June 19, 2015, 03:16:48 PM »
I advise you to embrace your value to your customers, don't feel bad, or stress about it, be proud of your rate!

Thank you for the moral support! Since I've never freelanced before, this is a scary prospect, but good scary.

monstermonster

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #18 on: June 19, 2015, 04:02:34 PM »
I'm really curious about this because this keeps happening to me where people ask me to provide this service essentially, and I've started going out to the bar and working with friends on their budgets & spending, and I do give some financial advice (retirement, ETFs, etc, but I don't give specific advice on which ones.) I always preface everything by reminding them I'm not an expert or certified, I'm just offering this as a friend because I find it fun. I won't ever ask for pay (as I worry about the legal aspect) but I do occasionally get my beer bought for me.

I've been asked by my former boss (at my alma mater) to teach a Financial Basics 101 class to students in the fall (as a volunteer) and I'm wondering if I'm stepping into hot water given I'm also not a CFP....

Goldielocks

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #19 on: June 19, 2015, 07:37:56 PM »
I appreciate all the warnings. I think I'm safe, though. I don't have a CFP license, but I'm only going to focus on the spending side of things, not hand out any investment advice. And when I looked into it, pretty much anyone can call themselves a financial advisor, as long as they don't misrepresent themselves as having a certification.

Edited to clarify that I am not even calling myself a financial advisor, just a budget helper.

BarrettSun, I may graciously steal that pricing idea, thank you.

Hi, I am taking the CFP now myself.  If you don't know the difference between a financial planner and a Financial advisor, you need to at least learn why many accountants and advisors alike recommend the CFP credential for exactly your service. I don't think it is illegal, yet, just warned against.

To your original question, the 20 something's may not always want to pay, but their parents certainly would !

Food for thought.

Goldielocks

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #20 on: June 19, 2015, 07:44:35 PM »
I'm really curious about this because this keeps happening to me where people ask me to provide this service essentially, and I've started going out to the bar and working with friends on their budgets & spending, and I do give some financial advice (retirement, ETFs, etc, but I don't give specific advice on which ones.)

I've been asked by my former boss (at my alma mater) to teach a Financial Basics 101 class to students in the fall (as a volunteer) and I'm wondering if I'm stepping into hot water given I'm also not a CFP....

This is a great summary of exactly the CFP designation!  Especially the retirement planning.  As opposed to FA Which is about investments and sales.

You don't need a license, but there is a ton of industry chatter about changing that for various reasons.

pbkmaine

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #21 on: June 19, 2015, 08:39:58 PM »
CFP with securities licenses here. Without going into a very long and technical ramble, you are doing the right thing by staying completely away from investments. Investment advice is heavily regulated. It takes a lot of training and experience to understand what you should and should not say and do. And I don't want to even start on the documentation requirements. For those interested in financial planning, I do recommend joining your local Financial Planning Association chapter and speaking to its members about what they do. Also look into the CFP. I learned a lot when I took the courses, even though I had been in related fields for years.

electriceagle

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #22 on: June 19, 2015, 09:23:32 PM »
I appreciate all the warnings. I think I'm safe, though. I don't have a CFP license, but I'm only going to focus on the spending side of things, not hand out any investment advice. And when I looked into it, pretty much anyone can call themselves a financial advisor, as long as they don't misrepresent themselves as having a certification.

Edited to clarify that I am not even calling myself a financial advisor, just a budget helper.

BarrettSun, I may graciously steal that pricing idea, thank you.

Channeling my inner pessmist:

Do you have liability insurance? If/when someone claims that they lost money because you recommended that they transfer their debt to a 0% credit card, but they forgot to pay it back, someone has to pay for your lawyer.

monstermonster

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #23 on: June 20, 2015, 01:08:00 PM »
I'm really curious about this because this keeps happening to me where people ask me to provide this service essentially, and I've started going out to the bar and working with friends on their budgets & spending, and I do give some financial advice (retirement, ETFs, etc, but I don't give specific advice on which ones.)

I've been asked by my former boss (at my alma mater) to teach a Financial Basics 101 class to students in the fall (as a volunteer) and I'm wondering if I'm stepping into hot water given I'm also not a CFP....

This is a great summary of exactly the CFP designation!  Especially the retirement planning.  As opposed to FA Which is about investments and sales.

You don't need a license, but there is a ton of industry chatter about changing that for various reasons.

I'd really like to get a CFP license actually, but the cost of the courses is currently out of my price range. Professionally I work as a fundraiser and have to tread very very carefully because I work with folks on planned giving (aka leaving money to our nonprofit in their will) and I have a clear point at which I have to say "thank you for being willing to make a gift, now it's time you go talk to your lawyer or accountant instead of me"


pbkmaine

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #24 on: June 20, 2015, 03:12:13 PM »
Monstermonster: go to a meeting of your local chapter of the Financial Planning Association and network. There are firms that will hire you and pay for your CFP.

ender

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #25 on: June 20, 2015, 04:24:36 PM »
I have thought a lot about such a plan (becoming a financial counselor for my job) and even talked with someone I know who does it to his perspective.

The biggest problem with this is your target audience normally doesn't often have either the means or desire to pay for such a service. Especially when you consider how much you actually have to charge to make it worthwhile from a career perspective.

If they are broke, they have no money. If they are spending recklessly, they won't care. Or some combination. You'll get a lot of resistance at paying $40+ a session from most people.

But you don't need most people, you need the right people. Which in NYC is probably easier than elsewhere.

To really be effective at getting paying clients, you want corporate clients - who will pay you for a seminar type of class which can make a lot more than smaller clients.

So your questions to consider might be: what is your time worth to you? Do you have interest in expanding this someday to a career?

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #26 on: June 20, 2015, 07:18:38 PM »
I'm on my phone so I may miss something, but here's a start:

I don't have liability insurance, but I will look into it.

I am not planning on making this a full career. I have a good stash already, and this was mostly a way to make a little extra cash on the side and have a flexible, albeit small, income stream in retirement. It also scratches my itch for telling friends what to do with their money, since most don't want my help.

I was using the term financial advisor as a catch-all for anybody who helps with money, but I hadn't researched the CFP much, which was a big mistake. I mostly knew about it through other people's experience after giving it up. Their reasons dissuaded me, and also made it seem like a significant part of the job was investment advice/selling financial services that had referral fees.

I know payment can be an issue with this specific target audience, which is why I want to find out sooner rather than later whether this is viable. I have considered doing seminars, but scheduling that during normal business hours will be difficult since I work full-time.

Going through parents who know their kids won't listen to them is a good possibility that I will look into.

I should have posted here months ago, lots of great advice and "you dumb dumb" warnings which is all useful.

Kitties are the best

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #27 on: June 21, 2015, 09:35:56 PM »
Hi Money Jenga. I love your journal, saw the link on your page that bought me here.

I thought I could reply from the perspective of someone who could have really done with your services a few years ago.

Speaking as a young(ish), female professional living in an urban area (formerly London, now Melbourne), I didn't have a clue about personal finances for all of my 20's. It was something that was always in the back of my mind as a worry but I didn't tackle it as I really didn't know how.

A few life circumstances meant that I ended up having to take things more seriously, but my knowledge was cobbled together and the advice I received was never tailored to my personal circumstances.

I agree with the other posters who say that your business is likely largely to come through referrals. I would have shouted from the rooftops if I had been able to access this service. I think the $50 p/h fee is entirely reasonable.

Aside from referrals, I'd see if you can talk to friends in offices - if you can pop into businesses to run a 30-45 minute 'lunch seminar', that would be a great way of meeting new contacts. Young women might not want contact you without a referral but it's not intimidating to go along to a free lunch seminar held in your office building- here they could learn about the basics of budgeting and then the sell in would be to book you for a one-on-one appointment to go through their budget afterwards.

I like that you position yourself as a coach who focuses on the emotional and psychological side of spending. Women who might be resistant to spending money on pure 'finance' advice might be more open to spending money on self development. Understanding why you have certain attitudes to money and why you spend the way you do, is arguably more in the personal development realm anyway. My unhealthy spending is tied up in feelings of self-worth and I'm only just starting to de-tangle this.

Once you FIRE, if you keep on doing this as a sideline, you will be walking the walk. People will take you seriously because if you are self made, don't have a day job and don't need the income... you have clearly mastered money. 

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #28 on: June 22, 2015, 07:31:54 AM »
Thank you so much for that comment, Kitties are the best! It's great to hear from someone who used to be in my target audience that you would've appreciated the service and been fine with paying that fee. The free office seminar is a good one. I've been thinking about designing a short presentation and testing it with friends and coworkers.

And good work on cobbling together the information on your own and figuring stuff out. If you want someone to bounce ideas off of, feel free to PM me.

monstermonster

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #29 on: June 22, 2015, 06:26:48 PM »
pbkmaine: Thanks for the advice! I'm actually very happy in my current field/position, more interested in the side gig nature but I'll look up the events and at least network!

KMMK

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #30 on: June 22, 2015, 09:42:08 PM »
Following, as this is exactly the type of business I am currently developing.

Kaspian

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #31 on: June 24, 2015, 02:34:23 PM »
I was using the term financial advisor as a catch-all for anybody who helps with money, but I hadn't researched the CFP much, which was a big mistake. I mostly knew about it through other people's experience after giving it up. Their reasons dissuaded me, and also made it seem like a significant part of the job was investment advice/selling financial services that had referral fees.

Not sure I understand that.  You gave up researching or those other people gave up on getting theirs?  Personally, I'd never take investment advice on somebody who gave up (failed, etc.) getting their CFP.  It'd be like getting somebody who flunked out of auto shop to fix your car.  The pass rate for CFP is 62%.  Considering some of the dumbbells I've had to deal with at the bank, I think it should be a cakewalk.

I mean, even if you show somebody a hundred ways to save and how to make a budget, when they ask you what the should do with the savings you have to shut-up or you've crossed the invisible line into planning.

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #32 on: June 24, 2015, 03:08:48 PM »
Considering that insurance salesmen at Northwestern Mutual can call themselves financial advisors, I'm skeptical that there is any risk in using that title.  Just don't claim to be certified or have a fiduciary duty.

If liability toward your clients is an issue, you should form an LLC.  Should be relatively cheap and only marginally complicates your taxes.  Frankly, I can't really see what the liability would be.  You're going to tell professional women that a $400 purse will never replace the love of their parents... :p

partgypsy

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #33 on: June 24, 2015, 03:19:01 PM »
I have thought a lot about such a plan (becoming a financial counselor for my job) and even talked with someone I know who does it to his perspective.

The biggest problem with this is your target audience normally doesn't often have either the means or desire to pay for such a service. Especially when you consider how much you actually have to charge to make it worthwhile from a career perspective.

If they are broke, they have no money. If they are spending recklessly, they won't care. Or some combination. You'll get a lot of resistance at paying $40+ a session from most people.

But you don't need most people, you need the right people. Which in NYC is probably easier than elsewhere.

To really be effective at getting paying clients, you want corporate clients - who will pay you for a seminar type of class which can make a lot more than smaller clients.

So your questions to consider might be: what is your time worth to you? Do you have interest in expanding this someday to a career?

It was hard to verbalize my concerns but above and Kaspian took the words out of my mouth. Most people I know in financial trouble either don't want to know they are in financial trouble, or don't want to pay for the service. I could be wrong though, because many people do attend Financial Peace seminars, so maybe there is a market? How to reach those people?
2nd, saying you are not a financial planner while throwing around the term financial advisor, and saying you will avoid problems by saying you are not a financial planner I can see that being tricky. People want a holistic approach to their money. You are advising them on budgets, but then when they ask where they should put their money you either tell them something that may get you in legal problems later, or say, sorry "I can't tell you that" That would annoy me if I was paying someone to "help me out with my money" and you can't do that. Not saying what you are doing is a no go, but I guess if I was doing this I'd want to know what the limits of what you can or cannot advise someone, if you are not a certified financial planner. In the same way I was a notary, part of the training is knowing what you can and cannot do, or advise someone.
« Last Edit: June 24, 2015, 03:20:55 PM by partgypsy »

MonkeyJenga

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #34 on: June 24, 2015, 03:28:32 PM »
Hi everyone - I'm still at work and won't have time to respond in more detail until tomorrow, so I wanted to clarify one thing quickly. I do NOT call myself a financial advisor. I mentioned that there's no restriction around using that term only to illustrate how lax the rules seem to be around what people call themselves, and that calling myself something even weaker like a "budget helper" wouldn't get me in regulatory trouble.

ender

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Re: Will this person pay me?
« Reply #35 on: June 24, 2015, 05:12:14 PM »
I could be wrong though, because many people do attend Financial Peace seminars, so maybe there is a market? How to reach those people?

Keep in mind FPU is ~$100 for a 9 week course with 1+ hour sessions, which includes a book, workbook, dedicated plans, community accountability, and has a lot of "street credit" and advertising value.

Dave Ramsey has built himself a phenomenal brand and has thousands upon thousands (millions?) of success stories/testimonials.