Author Topic: What safety and accessories does a wood stove require?  (Read 1449 times)

ender

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What safety and accessories does a wood stove require?
« on: December 19, 2016, 10:09:08 AM »
Our house has a wood stove. We've never used it. I'm a little paranoid lighting a fire in our house, but the -15F temperatures yesterday made me wish it was setup.

We have some wood from a tree in our backyard and often see "truckload of wood $75" types of posts on the local swap groups which suggests we could get quite a bit of firewood if we wanted to regularly use it.

What sorts of things do I need to know for safety or "accessories" that are useful?

swiper

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Re: What safety and accessories does a wood stove require?
« Reply #1 on: December 19, 2016, 10:34:20 AM »
I found this a useful resource: http://www.woodheat.org/

We have a carbon monoxide detector close to the stove (in addition to combo units in sleeping areas and floors)

As your starting out, spending $75 for an inspection and cleaning can be worth it. Take the time to ask questions and learn how to clean the chimney yourself.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2016, 10:35:54 AM by swiper »

conpewter

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Re: What safety and accessories does a wood stove require?
« Reply #2 on: December 19, 2016, 10:38:27 AM »
We've been trying to run our woodstove more this year to cut heating costs.

As far as accessories go, it is nice to have a steel bucket with a shovel that you can clear out ash with and let it sit in the bucket for a day in case there are any coals left, and then you can toss it, or put it on the garden.

I'm a bit paranoid with my stove since my house is older and quite flammable.  I try not to mess with the fire for 20 minutes or so before bed so I could see if a hot ember fell out and was near anything, we have tile in front of our woodstove, but eventually there is laminate flooring.  I turn off the air at night too so there is not a roaring fire (Our stove is an EPA reburn type stove so i can only shut down the main air intake, not the secondary)

Another precaution i take is to dry my wood for at least a whole season, so if I cut in the fall, I wait until next fall to use the wood.  I don't want to cause buildup and a potential chimney fire.  You also should get your chimney cleaned/checked yearly or more often, if you don't know/want to do that yourself.


Spork

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Re: What safety and accessories does a wood stove require?
« Reply #3 on: December 19, 2016, 10:48:03 AM »
I clean our chimney about 2x a year.  It would probably be more if we lived further north.  I do it myself with brush/rods bought off of Amazon.

Once a year I partly disassemble the stove and clean back behind the back.

I've rebuilt the seals once.  Our stove is about 5 years old... and the seals were getting pretty compressed.  I don't know about other brands, but on ours, it was a royal PITA.

I've replaced the secondary combustion chamber on ours once... but it was pretty obvious it was blown.  Air was moving through it pretty fast.  When you got a good coal bed and closed the damper, air still moved through it pretty fast.  You never got the low, glowing coal fire... there were always flames.

If you don't have one, you probably want a top and/or pipe thermometer.  This lets you know the stove is hot enough to close the damper... and lets you know it isn't over heating.

---

Side question for stove burners:  Do you folks have a wood shed for drying wood?  I've always just had a pile -- sometimes covered with a tarp and sometimes not.  I'm thinking I should break down and built a drying shed to reduce creosote.


swiper

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Re: What safety and accessories does a wood stove require?
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2016, 10:57:21 AM »

Side question for stove burners:  Do you folks have a wood shed for drying wood?  I've always just had a pile -- sometimes covered with a tarp and sometimes not.  I'm thinking I should break down and built a drying shed to reduce creosote.


This year I'm storing wood in my garage. I put down 2 cinder blocks and put 2 2X4X12 between them. At the ends i inserted 2 2X3 vertically into the cinder blocks and stacked wood in-between (putting in some scrap wood to support the 12 foot length). Doing it this way lets the weight of the stack hold up the ends and thus lets me build a much higher, stable stack.  Not needing to go outside to get firewood is nice too. Next years supply is outside in a similar system, covered with a strip (2 foot wide) of vapour barrier material (cheaper than a tarp). I measure the wood moisture and haven't seen an issue with this type of storage.

similar to this: https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=images&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwjSiojG6oDRAhXn54MKHWH3CmQQjRwIBw&url=http%3A%2F%2Fkinggeorgehomes.com%2Fdiy-firewood-rack%2Fdiy-indoor-cinderblock-firewood-rack-storage-design-using-reclaimed-wood-ideas%2F&psig=AFQjCNEyvMv0Ut-pBy8B0y4_4xRRlxqBGA&ust=1482256672917103 

We run a fancy blazeking Sirocco 30


"It has been said that a long straight row of firewood standing in the yard in springtime is like money in the bank.  It is indeed – as it dries in the summer sunshine, you’re collecting interest"   --http://www.woodheat.org/concise-guide.html ;)
« Last Edit: December 19, 2016, 11:53:06 AM by swiper »

Linea_Norway

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Re: What safety and accessories does a wood stove require?
« Reply #5 on: December 19, 2016, 12:23:51 PM »
We have had a woodstove for 16 years and use it often to save electricity. We cut trees in our garden in the early spring, cut into blocks and cleave it and stable it outside under a roof to dry. In autumn when we start firing the stove it is dry enough.

Fill the basket with wood in the evening. Then you set the basket to dry beside the warm stove. The next day you'll have dry wood to start with. Which is a lot better than wood from outside that starts collecting condens inside your house.

We clean the chimney once a year. The community sends a professional to do it. But he only cleans the verticle pipe. Our stove also has a horizontal pipe which we need to clean ourselves from inside. When we bought the house it was almost closed with residue on the inside. Remember to clean out the lowest part of the vertical pipe after it has been cleaned.

Since a few years we have a stove blower, or whatever you call it in English. I mean an old fashioned thing with a two wooden parts that split. The sides are made of leather and there is an exit valve on the other end. You move the parts from each other and back together again to blow air out of the exit. This device is perfect for blowing new life into an almost died fire. Much better than blowing air with your mouth.
I mean this: https://nl.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blaasbalg

Don't wear you nice sweater with white sleeves when doing anything inside the oven, like cleaning out ashes or putting in new wood. Your arms will garanteed get black spots that cannot be washed out of wool.

A wood basket can here in Norway be bought for low price on a flee market. There are also nice filten ones for sale, that I perfer in use. Buy a big one, so you don't need to refill twice a day.

You need a tool to scrape the ashes foreward and a spade to get it out. The other standard tool to pick up chunks of wood we seldom use, less than once a year. You also need a metal bucket with lock.

Also have thin pieces of wood ready to start the fire. And buy small chunks of firelighter. Most types work. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firelighter

When starting the fire, open all the vavles in the ovn and leave the door on a narrow gap. Start with some medium big blocks and put the firelighter in between, high enough so that the flames touch the wood above it. Stable above with the narrow pieces of wood. Then some bigger blocks above that. When it burns well, big yellow flames, close the ovn door, but leave valves open. Close the first valve some time later when the oven burns well. Don't close the smallest valves. When it burns too hard, you can close the remaining valves halfway.

Have a look at the Ecofan, which is a brilliant device that spreads the warmth well and it is without a power cord. Useful if you stove is not close to where you sit.
http://www.caframolifestylesolutions.com/products/ecofan/
« Last Edit: December 19, 2016, 12:35:12 PM by Linda_Norway »