Author Topic: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?  (Read 8967 times)

Hula Hoop

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #50 on: November 03, 2018, 04:25:55 PM »
I do pilates and I'm in my 40s.  I also walk to and from work a lot of the time. What motivates me is the fact that I'm getting older and I don't want to lose muscle mass.  Also weight bearing exercise is meant to be good for avoiding osteoporosis.  I also just feel a lot better when I exercise.

Plugra

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #51 on: November 03, 2018, 09:57:07 PM »
I am 51 and have been working out since I was about 25.  I make it to the gym 4 to 5 days a week and my workouts include weight training and cardio (running).  You asked those of use that are a bit older for our perspective on why we work out and is it worth it. 

I think as you age you will definitely see the upside of staying in shape (however you choose to go about it - it does not need to be at the gym).  I now look at many of my friends of similar age and they are are starting to deal with the health issues that go with not taking care for themselves. From simple things like aches and pains to high blood pressure and cholesterol issues.  So much of what they deal with is self inflicted due to lack of activity. 

Every year when I get my annual physical my doctor always tells me that he does not know what to do with me.  He tells me that he needs to lecture most guys my age because they are a group of self abusers that are starting down long roads of health issues.  With me, there is nothing to tell me.  Just keep it up.

Lastly, the energy I get a from a good workout is a bit of a high - and I think I am addicted to it.  A good addiction to have, I guess.

My experience exactly. 

Tons of research shows that people who exercise age MUCH better than people who don't.  No question about it.  If you work with the same group of people for a couple of decades (as I have) you'll start to see who exercises and who doesn't.  The ones who don't exercise look older, fatter, slower, more worn out, with more medical problems.  Going to the gym isn't necessary but you have to do something to stay in shape.

renata ricotta

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #52 on: February 21, 2020, 08:35:14 AM »
Your lethargy after your workouts seems a little odd to me - when I am in a daily routine where I work out hard at least once per day, I feel pretty energized because of it. What are you eating before to fuel you and how are you recovering afterward? You may be dehydrated or have an electrolyte depletion. You might also be experiencing volatile blood sugar.

I always have plenty of water before exercising, plus usually caffeine. Afterward I usually have a recovery drink that has lots of electrolytes and protein, plus a little bit of natural sugar. My go-to is a green smoothie with greens, a banana, coconut water (lots of electrolytes), protein powder (or plain yogurt/nuts for the protein), and whatever frozen fruits or veggies I have lying around.

Also maybe replace some of those high intensity workouts with a yoga class or similar. Most flow classes you still break a sweat and work on muscle strength, but itís less taxing overall than cross fit.

Ockhamist

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #53 on: February 21, 2020, 09:00:24 AM »
When you are 29, you can blow off staying fit and still feel OK.

I'm 51.   I will never make girls faint at the beach.   There's another reason I work out and try to stay fit, wish I had done better about it when I waz younger, but am glad that I did at least what I did.

I'll let you guess why.   

HINT:   The older you get, the more you'll be glad you did.

SECOND HINT:   You're on this forum.  Seeking FI is not about being able to light your cigars with $100 bills, it's about freedom and being able to enjoy and make the most of your life.   If you can't do anything physically it doesn't matter what you've got in your brokerage account.   You'd be amazed how decrepit you can be at 45.

Garrett B.

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #54 on: February 21, 2020, 10:14:35 AM »
I'm in my early 40's but health wise I feel better than when I was in my 20's.  My blood work all checks out perfectly as well.  I workout 3 times a week, but I think it helps. 

hodedofome

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #55 on: February 21, 2020, 11:39:57 AM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.

SugarMagnolia77

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #56 on: February 21, 2020, 12:27:26 PM »
This is a very old thread, so let's hope OP has found a gym or fitness regimen that works for them!

If I don't go to mt HIIT gym every day, I notice a difference in my mood after a couple days. It feels great to go, so I keep going back. :)

nereo

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #57 on: February 21, 2020, 12:45:15 PM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.

Do you have any evidence to back this up?  Because I tend to think the opposite overall.  Extroverts might be more likely to use a communal gym, but most of the introverts I know are into long runs or cycling or swimming or similar activities. 

Garrett B.

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #58 on: February 21, 2020, 12:47:16 PM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.
Not sure I agree with this.  I'm highly introverted and have been working out regularly for my entire adult life. 

Askel

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #59 on: February 21, 2020, 01:07:07 PM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.

Of course us introverts don't work out. We work in. 


Padonak

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #60 on: February 21, 2020, 01:11:19 PM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.
This is not how you shitpost, son. Learn from me:


Men are more likely to excercise than women.

Kris

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #61 on: February 21, 2020, 01:12:53 PM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.

That seems like an odd assertion. Do you have a source for that?

nereo

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #62 on: February 21, 2020, 01:17:28 PM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.
This is not how you shitpost, son. Learn from me:


Men are more likely to excercise than women.
No no no.  Around here it's "pay off your mortgage as quickly as possible".
:-P

wenchsenior

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #63 on: February 21, 2020, 01:18:37 PM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.
Not sure I agree with this.  I'm highly introverted and have been working out regularly for my entire adult life.

Working out is one of the few things that regularly motivates me to go into crowded public spaces (apart from being hungry and needing groceries LOL).

Also, why am I responding to a zombie thread? :shrugs:

Kris

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #64 on: February 21, 2020, 02:38:22 PM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.
This is not how you shitpost, son. Learn from me:


Men are more likely to excercise than women.

Literally LOL'ed.

hodedofome

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #65 on: February 23, 2020, 02:04:35 PM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.

Do you have any evidence to back this up?  Because I tend to think the opposite overall.  Extroverts might be more likely to use a communal gym, but most of the introverts I know are into long runs or cycling or swimming or similar activities.

https://books.google.com/books?id=VxpzAwAAQBAJ&lpg=PA1079&ots=uDYiwBDqqE&dq=extroverts%20are%20more%20likely%20to%20exercise%20then%20introverts&pg=PA1079#v=onepage&q=extroverts%20are%20more%20likely%20to%20exercise%20then%20introverts&f=false

Along with a host of other medical journals for anyone willing to do a google search.

GuitarStv

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #66 on: February 23, 2020, 03:47:45 PM »
Extroverts are more likely to exercise than introverts.
This is not how you shitpost, son. Learn from me:


Men are more likely to excercise than women.
No no no.  Around here it's "pay off your mortgage as quickly as possible".
:-P

I thought it was 'I just got a deal on a Vitamix blender - only 900$!'

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #67 on: February 23, 2020, 04:47:18 PM »
Lord, I do not know what the point is! The gym is like some weird cult, and I'm not feeling the spirit. I like moving, and I like exercise on my own terms. I don't understand gyms.

Malkynn

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #68 on: February 24, 2020, 06:44:26 AM »
Lord, I do not know what the point is! The gym is like some weird cult, and I'm not feeling the spirit. I like moving, and I like exercise on my own terms. I don't understand gyms.

I exercise on my own terms in the gym...I don't really understand this.

nereo

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #69 on: February 24, 2020, 06:50:27 AM »
Lord, I do not know what the point is! The gym is like some weird cult, and I'm not feeling the spirit. I like moving, and I like exercise on my own terms. I don't understand gyms.

I'd suggest finding a new gym.  Some gyms do cultivate a group-mentality which can be off-putting if you aren't into whatever they are doing.  Soul-Cycle and Cross-fit are on this end of the spectrum.  Others are basically shared communal spaces with minimal interaction between members.  This describes my current gym; been going there for four months, 3x-week.  I recognize many people and know a few names but beyond the casual "hello" I just do my thing and they do theirs.

wenchsenior

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #70 on: February 24, 2020, 09:12:17 AM »
Lord, I do not know what the point is! The gym is like some weird cult, and I'm not feeling the spirit. I like moving, and I like exercise on my own terms. I don't understand gyms.

I exercise on my own terms in the gym...I don't really understand this.

I don't either.  I go to the gym b/c they have equipment I don't have for exercise that I can't do anyplace else. When I'm doing exercise programs that don't involve that equipment, I can exercise at home.

I also don't understand the extrovert vs introvert comment up-thread...how does that answer the OP's question (even considering how out of date this thread is)?




AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #71 on: February 24, 2020, 05:19:37 PM »
Lord, I do not know what the point is! The gym is like some weird cult, and I'm not feeling the spirit. I like moving, and I like exercise on my own terms. I don't understand gyms.

I exercise on my own terms in the gym...I don't really understand this.

I don't either.  I go to the gym b/c they have equipment I don't have for exercise that I can't do anyplace else. When I'm doing exercise programs that don't involve that equipment, I can exercise at home.

I also don't understand the extrovert vs introvert comment up-thread...how does that answer the OP's question (even considering how out of date this thread is)?

Haha, I think basically that I don't relate at all to gym indicators of success. For example, I don't give a crap about the weight I can lift or the distance I can run, or how much either of those things have changed over time. Exercise on my own terms is more like going for a walk or run because I need to think or destress, and going for as long as that requires.

Kyle Schuant

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #72 on: February 24, 2020, 05:24:08 PM »
The classes I go to are making me run down to the point where outside of the gym Iíve become very lazy and Iíve come to the conclusion I was only going to the gym so I could look a bit better in pure vanity stakes.
Then you've been going to a shitty gym. Of course, you went to a Crossfit gym, so there you go. Their "appeal" is that they smash you.

Properly-done, training adds time to your day, because it gives you more energy and capability so as to make better use of the rest of your day. As well, cardiovascular fitness gives you a longer life, and physical strength and mobility a better life. If you think these things are unimportant visiting a nursing home some time.

A moderate approach to training with gradual progression, in combination with appropriate dietary changes such as eating more vegetables, and lifestyle changes such as screens off at 2130 (assuming a getting up time of 6-7) will not make you run down, but will actually improve your life.

Kyle Schuant

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #73 on: February 24, 2020, 05:28:46 PM »
One thing I noticed though was that I could not do more than 3 of the more high impact classes or I would feel sluggish and 2 was actually more ideal. If I wanted to exercise more than 2-3 a week I could do one lower impact class like water aerobics or go swimming or go for a long brisk walk perhaps with some running mixed in.
You have by experience hit on what competent trainers and coaches advise. In lifting, in a week there'll be a heavy, a light and a medium session (of if you do 3 lifts, for example, one might be heavy, one light and one medium, and they swap in the other two sessions). In endurance training, they have an 80/20 approach, where 80% of the sessions are easy-moderate, and 20% are hard.

This is in contrast to what newbies and incompetent trainers think is necessary, which is 100% hard.

mm1970

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #74 on: February 24, 2020, 05:43:59 PM »
One thing I noticed though was that I could not do more than 3 of the more high impact classes or I would feel sluggish and 2 was actually more ideal. If I wanted to exercise more than 2-3 a week I could do one lower impact class like water aerobics or go swimming or go for a long brisk walk perhaps with some running mixed in.
You have by experience hit on what competent trainers and coaches advise. In lifting, in a week there'll be a heavy, a light and a medium session (of if you do 3 lifts, for example, one might be heavy, one light and one medium, and they swap in the other two sessions). In endurance training, they have an 80/20 approach, where 80% of the sessions are easy-moderate, and 20% are hard.

This is in contrast to what newbies and incompetent trainers think is necessary, which is 100% hard.
I recently read something by a local running coach that said "conventional wisdom is that 80% of your training should be easy-moderate, and 20% hard, and that's actually backwards if you want to get real results!  You need to train HARD and FAST more often!"

I feel like I should google.  Or flat out ask her for her sources.

Because also - I think it probably varies a LOT on the person, and of course, individual risk of injury.  Two years ago I ran 3 half marathons and I trained HARD and made a lot of progress.  (Not intentionally that hard, but it occurred to me AFTER the 3rd half marathon that I'd been running all my long runs at race pace, oops!!)

Last year though...every time I tried to ramp the intensity (speed or distance), I got these nagging injuries.

nereo

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #75 on: February 24, 2020, 05:51:27 PM »
One thing I noticed though was that I could not do more than 3 of the more high impact classes or I would feel sluggish and 2 was actually more ideal. If I wanted to exercise more than 2-3 a week I could do one lower impact class like water aerobics or go swimming or go for a long brisk walk perhaps with some running mixed in.
You have by experience hit on what competent trainers and coaches advise. In lifting, in a week there'll be a heavy, a light and a medium session (of if you do 3 lifts, for example, one might be heavy, one light and one medium, and they swap in the other two sessions). In endurance training, they have an 80/20 approach, where 80% of the sessions are easy-moderate, and 20% are hard.

This is in contrast to what newbies and incompetent trainers think is necessary, which is 100% hard.
I recently read something by a local running coach that said "conventional wisdom is that 80% of your training should be easy-moderate, and 20% hard, and that's actually backwards if you want to get real results!  You need to train HARD and FAST more often!"

I feel like I should google.  Or flat out ask her for her sources.

Because also - I think it probably varies a LOT on the person, and of course, individual risk of injury.  Two years ago I ran 3 half marathons and I trained HARD and made a lot of progress.  (Not intentionally that hard, but it occurred to me AFTER the 3rd half marathon that I'd been running all my long runs at race pace, oops!!)

Last year though...every time I tried to ramp the intensity (speed or distance), I got these nagging injuries.
This coach is following old-school regimentation- which resulted in lots of injuries and substandard results. Rest and lower intensity days are as important as the higher intensity moments. Once you get to a high level of fitness, you can maintain that with just 10-15 minutes of HIT 2x per week coupled with lower intensity sessions the other days. Itís what we used to call a @taper@ in prep for championship meets.

Kyle Schuant

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #76 on: February 25, 2020, 04:27:05 AM »
I recently read something by a local running coach that said "conventional wisdom is that 80% of your training should be easy-moderate, and 20% hard, and that's actually backwards if you want to get real results!  You need to train HARD and FAST more often!"
You reply, "Sounds great, in ten years tell me how you're going with that."

There are a lot of hard diets and hard workouts. Quite often, they work! for as long as you can do them, a few months at most. Now, if you're working out for That One Day, like a competition or wedding or something, that's fine. But... there's a reason there are no Biggest Loser Specials. If you're working out for your health - well, you need something you can do for a lifetime.

Okay, this is my general advice to people. Individual needs vary, it depends on your capabilities (past training, injuries) and goals. So the "you" is the generic you.

The first thing to look at with endurance is a screen. If you have an ankle, knee, hip or lower back issue, see a physiotherapist or the like - don't start running. Find a BMI calculator online, if you're over BMI 35, see a doctor before doing anything, because you're carrying a lot of extra pounds - just think, if you got a healthy bodyweight but sedentary person and got them started running, would you advise them to carry an extra 50-100lbs with them while they did it? And if they did, what would you expect the result to be?

So if you're BMI 35+, see a doc. Likewise if you're BMI <18.5 - you may have low bone density or something, you don't want to be pounding the pavement. Long-term, nobody BMI >35 or <18.5 is healthy. Sorry.

If you're BMI 30-35, start with a 30-60' walk each day, don't worry about heart rate or whatever. Keep doing that and making the necessary dietary changes to get under BMI 30. "Yeah but it's all muscle." Probably not. But even if it were, that's still weight through your joints as you pound the pavement, so start with a walk.

If you're BMI 18.5-30, then you should still start with a 30-60' walk each day. Do that for about three months. Then start running. But here you want to look at the Maffetone number. This is an easier pace than you think. For most people it's going to be a slow shuffle barely faster than walking pace. That's fine! Over time you'll need to go faster to hit that number.

Many people have used this and similar methods to improve their cardiovascular fitness. But most people try to make up for a decade or more of being sedentary by going hard. If it doesn't injure you (and it does injure a lot of people) it works! But you can't keep it up.

Quote
Because also - I think it probably varies a LOT on the person, and of course, individual risk of injury.  Two years ago I ran 3 half marathons and I trained HARD and made a lot of progress.  (Not intentionally that hard, but it occurred to me AFTER the 3rd half marathon that I'd been running all my long runs at race pace, oops!!)

Last year though...every time I tried to ramp the intensity (speed or distance), I got these nagging injuries.
People are fairly evenly divided into meatheads and wusses. Meatheads go too hard and hurt themselves. Wusses go too easy (if they show up at all) and never achieve anything. A good programme, trainer or coach will help you steer the middle path. If you hear "go hard or go home" or the like, they're a meathead, avoid. If you hear "bosu ball" or "pilates" they're a wuss, avoid. Look carefully at the people they train. What have they achieved? How many injuries have they had to work through? How long have they worked with them? Be sceptical.

Malkynn

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #77 on: February 25, 2020, 05:05:16 AM »
Lord, I do not know what the point is! The gym is like some weird cult, and I'm not feeling the spirit. I like moving, and I like exercise on my own terms. I don't understand gyms.

I exercise on my own terms in the gym...I don't really understand this.

I don't either.  I go to the gym b/c they have equipment I don't have for exercise that I can't do anyplace else. When I'm doing exercise programs that don't involve that equipment, I can exercise at home.

I also don't understand the extrovert vs introvert comment up-thread...how does that answer the OP's question (even considering how out of date this thread is)?

Haha, I think basically that I don't relate at all to gym indicators of success. For example, I don't give a crap about the weight I can lift or the distance I can run, or how much either of those things have changed over time. Exercise on my own terms is more like going for a walk or run because I need to think or destress, and going for as long as that requires.

It all depends on your goals.
I do:
-walking for low level, longer time cardio, mental clarity, and to get outside
-pilates for core strength, flexibility, and wicked posture
-biking/elliptical for moderate intensity cardio (biking outside in nice weather)
-climbing 20 flights of stairs for shorter more intense cardio
-weights to a limited degree to combat muscle loss and promote bone density
-swimmimg for low impact and because it's fun
-physio to build stabilizer muscles and rehab overuse areas

I also don't care about pushing harder, or further, or faster, or heavier. I utilize the tools in the gym for my relevant purposes according to what my body needs.
That's all the gym is, a collection of tools.

My gym and pool are used by 80% seniors, so there's a lot of gentle and rehab based exercise going on.

There are TONS of really strong opinions out there about how best to get RESULTS, but again, it really all comes down to what results you care about, so a lot of the opinions are irrelevant to a lot of people, and actually lead to advice that keeps people from exercising as much as they might enjoy.

slappy

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #78 on: February 25, 2020, 07:06:57 AM »

I think the point of exercising is to feel some voluntary discomfort now so you donít have to feel involuntary discomfort in the future.

Did you just sum up all of mustachianism in one sentence? That's pretty much exactly how I view it, but I've never been able to articulate it so well.

mies

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #79 on: February 25, 2020, 07:38:30 AM »

I think the point of exercising is to feel some voluntary discomfort now so you donít have to feel involuntary discomfort in the future.

Did you just sum up all of mustachianism in one sentence? That's pretty much exactly how I view it, but I've never been able to articulate it so well.

Maybe :D

robartsd

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #80 on: February 25, 2020, 08:59:03 AM »
The first thing to look at with endurance is a screen. If you have an ankle, knee, hip or lower back issue, see a physiotherapist or the like - don't start running. Find a BMI calculator online, if you're over BMI 35, see a doctor before doing anything, because you're carrying a lot of extra pounds - just think, if you got a healthy bodyweight but sedentary person and got them started running, would you advise them to carry an extra 50-100lbs with them while they did it? And if they did, what would you expect the result to be?

So if you're BMI 35+, see a doc. Likewise if you're BMI <18.5 - you may have low bone density or something, you don't want to be pounding the pavement. Long-term, nobody BMI >35 or <18.5 is healthy. Sorry.

If you're BMI 30-35, start with a 30-60' walk each day, don't worry about heart rate or whatever. Keep doing that and making the necessary dietary changes to get under BMI 30. "Yeah but it's all muscle." Probably not. But even if it were, that's still weight through your joints as you pound the pavement, so start with a walk.
Cardio does not have to be on your feet. Swimming and cycling are great options for getting cardio without inflicting excessive pounding on the joints.

mm1970

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #81 on: February 25, 2020, 10:55:49 AM »
Quote
People are fairly evenly divided into meatheads and wusses. Meatheads go too hard and hurt themselves. Wusses go too easy (if they show up at all) and never achieve anything. A good programme, trainer or coach will help you steer the middle path. If you hear "go hard or go home" or the like, they're a meathead, avoid. If you hear "bosu ball" or "pilates" they're a wuss, avoid. Look carefully at the people they train. What have they achieved? How many injuries have they had to work through? How long have they worked with them? Be sceptical.

One of my running buddies said once that "most people run their easy runs too hard and their hard runs too easy".  I probably fall into that category.
But also, it's pretty hard to me to slow my long runs down to where they should be (and the 180 formula?  Gah, I end up at about 130 bpm and shoot, I could probably only keep my HR there by running 30 sec and walking 2 mins, lather, rinse, repeat.)  I did run my track workout hard today though.  Max HR too high, but I run high anyway.

I've been stalking (ha) on IG this particular coach (coaches) and I must say it's a pretty hard core group this time around.  Sometimes it's a mix - but they started this training round at 8 miles long run.  Another acquaintance that I know from various running groups is training with them, and she said she comes in 2nd to last, and she thinks it's only because the 60+ year old woman feels sorry for her.  This particular friend of mine easily runs 10:30 / mile on her long run, far faster than me (I'm using to being the caboose, not built like a runner).

How is going to work long term?  Hard to say - they do focus on core strength and stretching and all the other things you need to be able to do to run without injury.  So that's good.  But I still feel like there is some self-selection going on - where people who ARE fast and have been running forever choose these groups.  The coach herself is probably in her 50s (a few years older than me).  I just try to accept myself for where I am. 

Quote
It all depends on your goals.
I do:
-walking for low level, longer time cardio, mental clarity, and to get outside
-pilates for core strength, flexibility, and wicked posture
-biking/elliptical for moderate intensity cardio (biking outside in nice weather)
-climbing 20 flights of stairs for shorter more intense cardio
-weights to a limited degree to combat muscle loss and promote bone density
-swimmimg for low impact and because it's fun
-physio to build stabilizer muscles and rehab overuse areas

I also don't care about pushing harder, or further, or faster, or heavier. I utilize the tools in the gym for my relevant purposes according to what my body needs.
That's all the gym is, a collection of tools.

My gym and pool are used by 80% seniors, so there's a lot of gentle and rehab based exercise going on.

There are TONS of really strong opinions out there about how best to get RESULTS, but again, it really all comes down to what results you care about, so a lot of the opinions are irrelevant to a lot of people, and actually lead to advice that keeps people from exercising as much as they might enjoy.

As usual, great advice.  My goal this year, my 50th, is to have fun, not get injured, and enjoy my workouts.  So far so good.
Some days I lift weights and I can tell I need to go lighter.  Other times, heavier.

When I want to get faster, I know the sure way for me is to run hills, but I also know my HR is way way  high, so it kinda sucks.

This last week I did everything but ride a bike.  I tried a new class with Pilates/yoga/Tai chi combo and it was fabulous.  I even swam once.

Kyle Schuant

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #82 on: February 25, 2020, 03:26:37 PM »
Cardio does not have to be on your feet. Swimming and cycling are great options for getting cardio without inflicting excessive pounding on the joints.
Agreed. But in my experience, BMI 30+ people are willing to go for a walk, they are less willing to get on a bike or go for a swim. Unfortunately many people are embarrassed - by their bodies, their finances, their education, their social life, whatever it is they're trying to improve. I think that nobody who is making efforts to improve their life in some way should be at all embarrassed. I deal with what is, while working towards what should be.

As well, cycling requires buying a bike, some safe roads to ride it on, and swimming requires knowing how to swim and a nearby public swimming pool. Walking requires nothing but everyday clothing, and running nothing but runners. We want accessibility, we want to reduce barriers and excuses.

But if you are willing and able to cycle or swim, those are certainly very good things to do.

Quote from: mm1970
it's pretty hard to me to slow my long runs down to where they should be (and the 180 formula?  Gah, I end up at about 130 bpm and shoot, I could probably only keep my HR there by running 30 sec and walking 2 mins, lather, rinse, repeat.)
And 80% of your work should be that easy, yes. Thinking that you have to go flat-out and smash yourself to get fitness improvements is like thinking you have to live in a cardboard box under a bridge to save money. It may work in the short-term, but it's miserable and will have bad long-term consequences.

We do walk/runs often. The person can begin with something like 1' jog and 4' walk, 6 rounds. The next level is 2' jog and 3' walk, then 3'/2' and 4'/1'. After that we go to longer runs, like 5'/5' x4, then 6'/4' x4, and so on - the idea is to build up to an hour of running. It takes 4-6 months.

I look at the average heart rate over the walk/run. When that's below the MAF number 3 times in a row at a particular intensity, I know we can kick it up a level. That's why it takes 4-6 months, in most cases people will run 3 times a week and be able to kick it up once a week. Injury rate? Zero.

Your trainer friend sounds like one of those people who has been active her whole life. That's at most 15% of the population. The other 85% you'll see, whatever they're doing today is the first time they're doing something since high school. On another forum yesterday I saw barbell complexes and rucking a couple miles recommended for previously sedentary people in their 60s. I presume they get kickbacks from orthopaedic and cardiac surgeons.

marty998

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #83 on: February 26, 2020, 03:20:55 AM »
Cardio does not have to be on your feet. Swimming and cycling are great options for getting cardio without inflicting excessive pounding on the joints.
Agreed. But in my experience, BMI 30+ people are willing to go for a walk, they are less willing to get on a bike or go for a swim. Unfortunately many people are embarrassed - by their bodies, their finances, their education, their social life, whatever it is they're trying to improve. I think that nobody who is making efforts to improve their life in some way should be at all embarrassed. I deal with what is, while working towards what should be.

As well, cycling requires buying a bike, some safe roads to ride it on, and swimming requires knowing how to swim and a nearby public swimming pool. Walking requires nothing but everyday clothing, and running nothing but runners. We want accessibility, we want to reduce barriers and excuses.


Agree with this comment. Can I add that Parkrun 5k's are the most wonderful community for encouraging participation - there's definitely no embarrassment about ability or body size etc - everyone is welcome to take part.

mistymoney

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #84 on: February 26, 2020, 05:46:07 AM »
29 and going to the gym is exhausting you. I'd get a check up and full blood work done. vitamin D deficiency? check everything.

nereo

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #85 on: February 26, 2020, 06:09:26 AM »
Cardio does not have to be on your feet. Swimming and cycling are great options for getting cardio without inflicting excessive pounding on the joints.
Agreed. But in my experience, BMI 30+ people are willing to go for a walk, they are less willing to get on a bike or go for a swim. Unfortunately many people are embarrassed - by their bodies, their finances, their education, their social life, whatever it is they're trying to improve. I think that nobody who is making efforts to improve their life in some way should be at all embarrassed. I deal with what is, while working towards what should be.

As well, cycling requires buying a bike, some safe roads to ride it on, and swimming requires knowing how to swim and a nearby public swimming pool. Walking requires nothing but everyday clothing, and running nothing but runners. We want accessibility, we want to reduce barriers and excuses.


Agree with this comment. Can I add that Parkrun 5k's are the most wonderful community for encouraging participation - there's definitely no embarrassment about ability or body size etc - everyone is welcome to take part.

Maybe this is a regional thing.  Around here the community pools cater to overweight and obese individuals, including water aerobics and water-jogging classes. They seem to be the most popular and well attended groups.

I know many physicians push water-based exercise for their obese patients due to its ďnon-weight bearingĒ nature and ease on the joints.

FrugalToque

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #86 on: February 26, 2020, 06:40:04 AM »
29 and going to the gym is exhausting you. I'd get a check up and full blood work done. vitamin D deficiency? check everything.

That could be the nature of his Crossfit gym.  I find those places are really hit and miss.
Sometimes you have good personal trainers and sometimes it's a bunch of idiots teaching you how to destroy your knees.
To be fair, it's a lot like martial arts.
Some places teach you good self defence, self discipline and strength building.  Other places are glorified baby sitting with kids running around learning nothing.

Toque.

SaucyAussie

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #87 on: February 26, 2020, 06:46:22 AM »
One of my main goals of getting exercise is to get outside to breathe some fresh and get some sunlight - going to the gym would be completely counter productive for me.  Plus I hate the monthly payment.  And in general I just hate being at the gym.

FrugalToque

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #88 on: February 26, 2020, 07:06:47 AM »
One of my main goals of getting exercise is to get outside to breathe some fresh and get some sunlight - going to the gym would be completely counter productive for me.  Plus I hate the monthly payment.  And in general I just hate being at the gym.
I agree totally.

I went to a personal trainer because I found out I'd been doing squats and dead lifts wrong, which would eventually ruin my knees.
I spent a month with that trainer, hammered on my techniques, and now do them with my family in my basement.
When the weather permits (Ottawa is currently under a winter storm warning, 35cm of snow expected overnight) we run outside.  Otherwise, we have a treadmill.

Monthly fees are bad unless you're getting a great benefit from the product.

Toque.

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #89 on: February 26, 2020, 11:09:35 AM »
29 and going to the gym is exhausting you. I'd get a check up and full blood work done. vitamin D deficiency? check everything.

More likely they're just not eating for their exercise regime. I found the same thing when I was a regular gym goer, and it stopped as soon as I paid some attention to my diet.

mm1970

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #90 on: February 26, 2020, 02:39:27 PM »
One of my main goals of getting exercise is to get outside to breathe some fresh and get some sunlight - going to the gym would be completely counter productive for me.  Plus I hate the monthly payment.  And in general I just hate being at the gym.
I agree totally.

I went to a personal trainer because I found out I'd been doing squats and dead lifts wrong, which would eventually ruin my knees.
I spent a month with that trainer, hammered on my techniques, and now do them with my family in my basement.
When the weather permits (Ottawa is currently under a winter storm warning, 35cm of snow expected overnight) we run outside.  Otherwise, we have a treadmill.

Monthly fees are bad unless you're getting a great benefit from the product.

Toque.
My benefit is that it's my social outlet and gets me actually going to the gym.  Plus: the pool.

I've tried working out at home all the time, and it sucks and I just don't do it.  Plus my home is small.

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #91 on: February 26, 2020, 03:00:19 PM »
One of my main goals of getting exercise is to get outside to breathe some fresh and get some sunlight - going to the gym would be completely counter productive for me.  Plus I hate the monthly payment.  And in general I just hate being at the gym.
I agree totally.

I went to a personal trainer because I found out I'd been doing squats and dead lifts wrong, which would eventually ruin my knees.
I spent a month with that trainer, hammered on my techniques, and now do them with my family in my basement.
When the weather permits (Ottawa is currently under a winter storm warning, 35cm of snow expected overnight) we run outside.  Otherwise, we have a treadmill.

Monthly fees are bad unless you're getting a great benefit from the product.

Toque.
My benefit is that it's my social outlet and gets me actually going to the gym.  Plus: the pool.

I've tried working out at home all the time, and it sucks and I just don't do it.  Plus my home is small.

Sounds like you are getting a benefit, as frugal toque alluded too
FWIW I go to a gym for similar reasons. The pool primarily, plus the showers and a full set of equipment I donít want to buy, store or maintain. That and our work gets us a discount as part of our wellness plan that makes it dirt cheap. We basically break even by not showering at home much.

Many other people donít get such benefits. The entire gym subscription model is predicated on lots of members who rarely go. Thatís why contracts are such a common model, and why it often costs $12+ for a drop in.

FrugalToque

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #92 on: February 26, 2020, 03:04:05 PM »
One of my main goals of getting exercise is to get outside to breathe some fresh and get some sunlight - going to the gym would be completely counter productive for me.  Plus I hate the monthly payment.  And in general I just hate being at the gym.
I agree totally.

I went to a personal trainer because I found out I'd been doing squats and dead lifts wrong, which would eventually ruin my knees.
I spent a month with that trainer, hammered on my techniques, and now do them with my family in my basement.
When the weather permits (Ottawa is currently under a winter storm warning, 35cm of snow expected overnight) we run outside.  Otherwise, we have a treadmill.

Monthly fees are bad unless you're getting a great benefit from the product.

Toque.
My benefit is that it's my social outlet and gets me actually going to the gym.  Plus: the pool.

I've tried working out at home all the time, and it sucks and I just don't do it.  Plus my home is small.

Yeah, I've noticed that I'm the prime willpower/motivator guy around this house (and we do visit a community centre with a pool, just paying the day fee or for lessons).
But, generally, if I'm not exercising and dragging everybody through some cardio and weightlifting, we're not doing it.

For some people, the knowledge that they've spent the money on a gym is what gets them going.
Other people just don't like the home vibe and, like you, need the social aspect.
(In those cases, I would still try to get a home gym going, maybe with some shared barbells and dumbbells, with a few neighbours, but you gotta do what you gotta do to keep your body healthy, regardless.)

Toque

Malkynn

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #93 on: February 26, 2020, 03:05:55 PM »
My gym is a tiny little basement hole whose costs are shared by over a 1000 condo residents, but less than a dozen of us use it.

mm1970

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Re: What is the point in getting fit and going to gym?
« Reply #94 on: February 26, 2020, 05:31:20 PM »
One of my main goals of getting exercise is to get outside to breathe some fresh and get some sunlight - going to the gym would be completely counter productive for me.  Plus I hate the monthly payment.  And in general I just hate being at the gym.
I agree totally.

I went to a personal trainer because I found out I'd been doing squats and dead lifts wrong, which would eventually ruin my knees.
I spent a month with that trainer, hammered on my techniques, and now do them with my family in my basement.
When the weather permits (Ottawa is currently under a winter storm warning, 35cm of snow expected overnight) we run outside.  Otherwise, we have a treadmill.

Monthly fees are bad unless you're getting a great benefit from the product.

Toque.
My benefit is that it's my social outlet and gets me actually going to the gym.  Plus: the pool.

I've tried working out at home all the time, and it sucks and I just don't do it.  Plus my home is small.

Yeah, I've noticed that I'm the prime willpower/motivator guy around this house (and we do visit a community centre with a pool, just paying the day fee or for lessons).
But, generally, if I'm not exercising and dragging everybody through some cardio and weightlifting, we're not doing it.

For some people, the knowledge that they've spent the money on a gym is what gets them going.
Other people just don't like the home vibe and, like you, need the social aspect.
(In those cases, I would still try to get a home gym going, maybe with some shared barbells and dumbbells, with a few neighbours, but you gotta do what you gotta do to keep your body healthy, regardless.)

Toque
Ah yes, I can relate to being the prime motivator around the house. Right now i'm the only one who regularly does anything (except the kids get PE), and I'm the one who says "Okay, what are we doing for exercise today!!" on the weekends.

Spending more for sure makes me go more.  At one point I, ahem, had 3 gym memberships, and I really used the expensive one a LOT.

I do have a small-ish home gym setup (one kettlebell, several sets of dumbbells, a medicine ball, a mat, some bands, a foam roller, two sets of adjustable dumbbells, etc.) - these things are life savers when my husband travels for a week at a time.  It's super hard to get to my gym for an hour in the morning when I've got to get 2 kids to two schools, walk the dog, pack lunch, make breakfasts, and get to work at a decent hour.  Those are the days I do a 15-45 min workout at home, sometimes in my PJs.  About a week of that, though, and I'm ready to be back at the gym.