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Learning, Sharing, and Teaching => Ask a Mustachian => Topic started by: jengod on September 14, 2018, 08:30:58 PM

Title: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: jengod on September 14, 2018, 08:30:58 PM
What's something you voluntarily do analog or off-grid or unplugged as an intentional downshift or money saver or just because it's more fun?

Examples would be a clothesline vs electric drier, bicycle vs car, etc.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: OtherJen on September 14, 2018, 09:52:55 PM
What's something you voluntarily do analog or off-grid or unplugged as an intentional downshift or money saver or just because it's more fun?

Examples would be a clothesline vs electric drier, bicycle vs car, etc.

We hand wash all our dishes. We donít have a dishwasher, which is apparently shocking according to everyone we know (my MIL is horrified). I didnít grow up with a dishwasher so the lack of one doesnít bother me, and installing one would 1) cost money that we would rather place elsewhere and 2) remove valuable cabinet space in a small kitchen.

I also knit our dishcloths and kitchen towels.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: letired on September 14, 2018, 09:57:56 PM
I hang dry almost all my laundry. I think it makes my clothing last much longer, especially knits and things with elastic in them.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: nnls on September 15, 2018, 12:18:16 AM
I dont own a dryer or a dishwasher, I had neither growing up so I dont feel like I need one now.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: BookLoverL on September 15, 2018, 07:55:55 AM
We wash dishes by hand here, too.

I enjoy writing, and, while sometimes I write on my laptop, for certain things, especially poetry, I prefer to write on paper.

I've been trying to get my family to use a clothes dryer all year round instead of just on the sunniest days when we can use the outdoor one, but I got a lot of pushback from them when I brought it up so I decided there were probably better things to try and change first.

I prefer taking a paper map with me to trying to use Google maps when I'm out and about.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Sailor Sam on September 15, 2018, 08:59:06 AM
I don't know if it's strictly off-grid, but I get a kick out of using my crank powered radio.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: PoutineLover on September 15, 2018, 09:32:09 AM
I don't have a dryer or a dishwasher, and I write in a journal by hand. I use a paper agenda and I read paper books. I ride a bike and I don't have a car. It's not only to save money, but also because of the environmental impact, I don't really need it and the hassle would outweigh the benefits.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 15, 2018, 09:57:17 AM
*Meetings (live vs phone/video/etc)
*Conversation (text only to say: can you hang?)
*Music
*Reading material
*Dishes
*Most writing (pen/paper)
*Art
*Washing floors (have robot vacuum but not robot mop)
*Washing windows (robot available for that now)
*Print maps, yes
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Imma on September 15, 2018, 01:06:43 PM
Basically all of the above? We don't own a dishwasher or a dryer, or a robo mop (didn't know these existed!) or even an electric kettle.

I also make coffee in a French press and own a manual mixer. I like all these tiny rituals. I cook a lot and I hardly ever use any kind of machines.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: GuitarStv on September 15, 2018, 01:26:46 PM
I don't use a bike computer, cell phone, or bring any electronics on even very long bike rides.  This has resulted in a few adventures.

Last time I had to use the dryer I thought it was broken because it wouldn't start.  Turns out I was doing some electrical work almost a year prior and had flipped the breaker off.

I don't like reading from screens or electronic devices if I can avoid it, there's something just perfect about printed words on a page.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: WhiteTrashCash on September 15, 2018, 01:36:23 PM
I like reading graphic novels (comic books) which I get from the library. Really good ones can be as good as watching movies except there's no cost beyond what you already pay in library taxes. Right now, I'm reading a series by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Gaydos called "Alias" which was adapted into a Netflix TV series called "Jessica Jones". It's riveting stuff that explores some really complex issues about violence and identity.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: singpolyma on September 15, 2018, 01:42:05 PM
Bike, of course. And sweep instead of vacuum. Cloth wipes instead of paper towel or serviettes.

We did handwash dishes for awhile, but got a kijiji dishwasher for $25 that also gives us more counter space so went with that.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: GuitarStv on September 15, 2018, 01:44:20 PM
I like reading graphic novels (comic books) which I get from the library. Really good ones can be as good as watching movies except there's no cost beyond what you already pay in library taxes. Right now, I'm reading a series by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Gaydos called "Alias" which was adapted into a Netflix TV series called "Jessica Jones". It's riveting stuff that explores some really complex issues about violence and identity.

Bendis is one of the best comic writers currently active.  Not sure if I'd put him or Brian K Vaughn at the top.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 15, 2018, 04:49:26 PM
I also make coffee in a French press...

Oh yes, this too :)   A favourite ritual. But I use a Primula Coffee Brew Buddy -just a loose screen for pouring over.

And yes to simple pots, too, versus cooking machines, and a whisk.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Aegishjalmur on September 15, 2018, 05:05:02 PM
Handwash all laundry, dry on clothesline. Handwash dishes. Handgrind coffee(sometimes) and use a French press or pour over. I travel fulltime in a 19 ft 9 in long cargo van  so space and or power are issues. I do plan to get a crank clothes wringer to help with the laundry becomes towels jeans and any other heavy/thick fabric are a pain to wring out by hand.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: WhiteTrashCash on September 15, 2018, 06:17:43 PM
I like reading graphic novels (comic books) which I get from the library. Really good ones can be as good as watching movies except there's no cost beyond what you already pay in library taxes. Right now, I'm reading a series by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Gaydos called "Alias" which was adapted into a Netflix TV series called "Jessica Jones". It's riveting stuff that explores some really complex issues about violence and identity.

Bendis is one of the best comic writers currently active.  Not sure if I'd put him or Brian K Vaughn at the top.

I'm also partial to Jonathan Hickman. He has a very intellectual style that I enjoy.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Retire-Canada on September 15, 2018, 06:36:31 PM
- washing dishes by hand
- walking and bicycling to get stuff done
- hand written grocery and to do lists
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: sol on September 15, 2018, 06:48:45 PM
I wear a mechanical watch.  It is inferior to a modern quartz watch in every way; less accurate, less durable, more difficult to produce, and with fewer features.  But it is pretty, and I like the history of old timepieces.

After centuries of technological progress in horology, it represents the pinnacle of achievement of a totally dead technology, like the finest buggy whip, or a wooden sailboat.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 15, 2018, 07:25:04 PM
Oh, a wind-up, mechanical metronome! Love.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: markbike528CBX on September 15, 2018, 09:56:13 PM
Navigate on the road with paper maps.  It helps if the sun is out.  Confession: the timepiece usually is digital.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Imma on September 16, 2018, 06:57:13 AM
Handwash all laundry, dry on clothesline. Handwash dishes. Handgrind coffee(sometimes) and use a French press or pour over. I travel fulltime in a 19 ft 9 in long cargo van  so space and or power are issues. I do plan to get a crank clothes wringer to help with the laundry becomes towels jeans and any other heavy/thick fabric are a pain to wring out by hand.

I handwashed the first year I lived on my own, I wouldn't to go back to that! And I cheated a bit, because usually I washed my sheets and other big items when I visited relatives. I think getting a clothes wringer is a good idea. My grandma had a long-term wrist injury because of all the laundry she wrung out by hand in the 50s.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: AccidentalMiser on September 16, 2018, 07:25:18 AM
I wear a mechanical watch.  It is inferior to a modern quartz watch in every way; less accurate, less durable, more difficult to produce, and with fewer features.  But it is pretty, and I like the history of old timepieces.

After centuries of technological progress in horology, it represents the pinnacle of achievement of a totally dead technology, like the finest buggy whip, or a wooden sailboat.

I had a mechanical watch which finally died.  I loved it but can't justify replacing it with another since I have a perfectly good Timex.  Maybe for next Fathers Day.

I love to use a manual hand saw when building things if I'm not in a hurry.  I also like to spin vinyl on an old record player.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Khaetra on September 16, 2018, 09:47:00 AM
I write paper grocery lists (which of course I leave at home on the table :) ).  I sometimes read paper books (most I own are digital), but I subscribe to paper magazines (Time, New Yorker, SI, etc.).  I hand-wash dishes and I sweep instead of vacuum.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: teen persuasion on September 16, 2018, 10:41:54 AM
Line dry all clothes, hand wash dishes (no clothes dryer or dishwasher).

Have a Kitchenaid mixer, but prefer to hand mix cookies and dough, and hand knead dough.  I prefer to make mozzarella cheese for pizza, too, it's just so much better than the preshredded stuff in a bag.  And it's not part-skim, or, horrors, low-fat!  Sorry, fat is not evil, but fake sweeteners and low-fat foods are.

I recently did a stint of sewing (hadn't used my machine in years) - made my dress for DD3's wedding, and had to hem up DD1's bridesmaid dress.  I didn't use my treacle treadle machine (mostly because it's buried under piles of tax papers), but I did use the old Singer I inherited from my great aunt (which was originally her older sister's).  It's one of the old, black cast iron ones, with lots of mechanical attachments for zigzagging or strongholds buttonholes, etc.

Ha, last Sunday we butchered the first of our chickens (too many roosters), so Tuesday we enjoyed a roast chicken dinner.  That was a learning experience, but much easier than we expected.

ETA: To fix stupid auto corrects.  Obviously the old fashioned words are falling out of use.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: wenchsenior on September 16, 2018, 01:14:24 PM
I was honestly unaware there were other ways to grocery shop than using a list...if you don't take a list, how do you do it?
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: OtherJen on September 16, 2018, 01:33:21 PM
I was honestly unaware there were other ways to grocery shop than using a list...if you don't take a list, how do you do it?

I use a free grocery list app on my phone.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: wenchsenior on September 16, 2018, 01:39:45 PM
I was honestly unaware there were other ways to grocery shop than using a list...if you don't take a list, how do you do it?

I use a free grocery list app on my phone.

Ah, ok.  I wasn't aware that was a thing.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Imma on September 16, 2018, 02:12:39 PM
I was honestly unaware there were other ways to grocery shop than using a list...if you don't take a list, how do you do it?

I use a free grocery list app on my phone.

Ah, ok.  I wasn't aware that was a thing.

You are clearly not from the milennial generation :)

My boyfriend rolls his eyes every time I write down a list on the back of an envelope.

I also still send birthday and christmas cards (around a dozen, not to every single person I've ever met). I prefer sending and receiving mail over a text message.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: OtherJen on September 16, 2018, 02:48:53 PM
I was honestly unaware there were other ways to grocery shop than using a list...if you don't take a list, how do you do it?

I use a free grocery list app on my phone.

Ah, ok.  I wasn't aware that was a thing.

You are clearly not from the milennial generation :)

Iím not either, but I didnít grow up with even a home PC so I find having a little computer that fits in my pocket or purse to be amazingly cool. We have inexpensive Android phones and I love all the freebie apps that do useful things.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: wenchsenior on September 16, 2018, 05:37:34 PM
I was honestly unaware there were other ways to grocery shop than using a list...if you don't take a list, how do you do it?

I use a free grocery list app on my phone.

Ah, ok.  I wasn't aware that was a thing.

You are clearly not from the milennial generation :)

I’m not either, but I didn’t grow up with even a home PC so I find having a little computer that fits in my pocket or purse to be amazingly cool. We have inexpensive Android phones and I love all the freebie apps that do useful things.

ETA: I'm a Gen Xer, and computers didn't become a regular 'thing' until I was an undergrad in college, though I had worked on one of the earliest Apple PCs in my junior and senior year of high school, so I was exposed fairly early for my age cohort. 

I have a suspicion that by the time I actually NEED a smartphone (tbh, I'm not even clear on what-all they do except give you internet access (sometimes) on top of your ability to call people, and a voice that gives driving directions), they will be obsolete.  But you never know...
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: SnackDog on September 16, 2018, 05:55:28 PM
I recently finished a couple months of walking to work and back.  My clothes were a soaking mess in the afternoon.  Now that rainy season is here I have caved in and am driving which feels much more natural.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Imma on September 17, 2018, 02:44:47 AM
I was honestly unaware there were other ways to grocery shop than using a list...if you don't take a list, how do you do it?

I use a free grocery list app on my phone.

Ah, ok.  I wasn't aware that was a thing.

You are clearly not from the milennial generation :)

Iím not either, but I didnít grow up with even a home PC so I find having a little computer that fits in my pocket or purse to be amazingly cool. We have inexpensive Android phones and I love all the freebie apps that do useful things.

ETA: I'm a Gen Xer, and computers didn't become a regular 'thing' until I was an undergrad in college, though I had worked on one of the earliest Apple PCs in my junior and senior year of high school, so I was exposed fairly early for my age cohort. 

I have a suspicion that by the time I actually NEED a smartphone (tbh, I'm not even clear on what-all they do except give you internet access (sometimes) on top of your ability to call people, and a voice that gives driving directions), they will be obsolete.  But you never know...

I held off buying a smartphone for the longest time - and I didn't actually have data until about a year ago. At some point it just became really difficult because nobody calls anyone anymore and whatsapp has become the norm for communication. Instead of sending me a seperate text message, they'd just send a whatsapp message to my boyfriend, who got tired of that after a while.

Also, I use bus/trains a lot and they stopped printing timetable booklets a few years ago. My boyfriend also got tired of me calling him at home asking if he could look up the timetable for me on the website everytime I missed a connection. So he's the one who really pushed me to get a smartphone. I've found that since I've had a smartphone, I hardly use my computer anymore except for work. I kind of like it, because the computer is in a bedroom upstairs. Now I read the news in the morning while I'm downstairs waiting for the kettle to boil.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: GuitarStv on September 17, 2018, 07:11:31 AM
I recently finished a couple months of walking to work and back.  My clothes were a soaking mess in the afternoon.  Now that rainy season is here I have caved in and am driving which feels much more natural.

YMMV and all that, but a good rain jacket is sometimes viewed as cheaper and more practical to own than a car.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: catccc on September 17, 2018, 07:52:46 AM
I took the "beep-beep!"  key fob off of my keychain a couple years ago and I use the actual key to open my car door.  Actually, that's DH's car, which I usually drive, because it gets better mileage and I have the longer commute.  My truck doesn't even have power locks.  Or power windows.  I really like cranking those things up and down!  It's a familiar movement from my youth and I get nostalgic every time.

I am currently reading a book called "movement matters" and the author mentions key fobs and tea bags as modern conveniences that don't really save time, just save movement, and it's bad for us.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: herbgeek on September 17, 2018, 07:57:53 AM
I grow a lot of my own food in the summer.  Likely not cheaper when all is factored in, but the freshness and flavor cannot be beat.  Plus, I know exactly what is in my soil, and that if anything was sprayed on, its safe for me to eat.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 17, 2018, 09:18:21 AM
^ Yes! My tiny garden takes money and time -not much, but it saves me neither- but is so satisfying in countless ways! I finally bought a trowel and snippers recently, one fancy step up from the cooking spoon and scissors I had been using out there :)    I still fill and carry the watering can, though, versus using the hose/spray nozzle.

Like catcccís manual car windows, this approach to gardening brings me right back to the way I did it as a kid, and every movement just fills me up.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Schaefer Light on September 17, 2018, 11:23:15 AM
I was honestly unaware there were other ways to grocery shop than using a list...if you don't take a list, how do you do it?
I remember everything in my head ;).  In all seriousness, I prefer having a paper list to looking at a list on my phone.  A piece of paper is lighter than a phone, I don't worry about dropping it or getting it wet, and I can stick it in my pocket and take it back out without having to unlock it.  Plus, I just feel stupid walking around staring at a phone.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: sol on September 17, 2018, 11:25:18 AM
Plus, I just feel stupid walking around staring at a phone.

Um, this is 2018.  "Walking around staring at a phone" is the definition of 2018.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Retire-Canada on September 17, 2018, 11:29:11 AM
Um, this is 2018.  "Walking around staring at a phone" is the definition of 2018.

This is true, but I do feel stupid walking around looking at my phone all the time....even if lots of other people do it.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: GuitarStv on September 17, 2018, 11:36:59 AM
Um, this is 2018.  "Walking around staring at a phone" is the definition of 2018.

This is true, but I do feel stupid walking around looking at my phone all the time....even if lots of other people do it.

Telling the emperor he's naked only works if he's not reading tweets about how awesome he looks and updating his facebook status to 'Blingin new clothes y'all!!!!!11111".  :P
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: frugaliknowit on September 17, 2018, 11:54:07 AM
Only paper airline boarding passes (tried the phone thing and didn't like it), bike whenever reasonably possible, French press coffee (mostly for its compactness), paper shopping lists (scratch paper from recycle recepticle), hang dry quality polo shirts and anything with elastic or spandex.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: AMandM on September 17, 2018, 01:53:34 PM
I keep track of our spending on paper.  Write down expenditures in a ledger book, one column per category.

I also answer the door in person, not with a video feed app.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Samuel on September 17, 2018, 02:26:14 PM
35mm SLR camera + BW film.

Using a contraption of gears and springs and glass to paint with light and silver halide crystals is pure science but feels a lot like magic.


Although I do make some concessions to modernity... I'll develop the film at home but then scan the negatives rather than print in darkrooms. I also use the vintage lenses on my whizbang digital camera. But still, it's really rewarding when you occasionally capture a great image and know that none of the decisions that went into it were delegated to a microprocessor.



Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: adamsputnik on September 17, 2018, 02:40:56 PM
I build furniture entirely unplugged. That may be my only real concession, aside from the rare times I put the kettle on for some tea.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: jengod on September 17, 2018, 11:59:23 PM
I also answer the door in person, not with a video feed app.

When we remodeled our house four years ago, we took out the doorbell apparatus and didn't replace it. I now consider doorbells to be uninvited noise pollution. Some realtor trying to solicit business can just walk up to my door and make a loud noise that wakes up a napping baby or a napping me? What?! Door knocks are the limit for us.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: sol on September 18, 2018, 12:23:53 AM
When we remodeled our house four years ago, we took out the doorbell apparatus and didn't replace it. I now consider doorbells to be uninvited noise pollution.

That's an interesting development.  Do you think it's a sign of just how electronically interconnected we have become that we no longer feel any compulsion to even respond to an in-person visitation at your home?  There was a time not so long ago when you might literally never see another human being over the course of a week if your farmhouse didn't have a doorbell. 

What about the neighbor who needs to borrow a cup of sugar?  Your pastor dropping by to ask about your aging parents?  The kids next door who want to ride bikes with your kids?  The matronly lady up the block who heard you were sick and brought you some cookies?  Have we really become so callous to the pleasantries of face to face interactions that we deliberately choose to remove opportunities to have them? 

When I was a kid I use to have to go around ringing doorbells in my neighborhood once a month to collect the monthly checks from everyone on my paper route.  Imagine that severity of the cultural shift between then and now, that my kids understand no part of that sentence.  Maybe they can live without doorbells, but I sure couldn't.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 18, 2018, 12:35:16 AM
Have we really become so callous to the pleasantries of face to face interactions that we deliberately choose to remove opportunities to have them? 

No. We've become so overwhelmed with the constant inundation of sounds, people, demands, requests, "spontaneity", manufactured crises, and engines that we choose to maintain our homes as sanctuaries, so that we can rest deeply...then step back out into the world refreshed and ready to engage deeply with friends and strangers alike.

I spend a hilarious amount of time with neighbours and other members of my community...and scooped up a neighbour's two young children for two hours yesterday so mom could have a break and the kids could have connection... and had three community members in my home for a long tea and deep conversation two days before that... and partied with three dozen others in another friend's home the same morning.

Endless small, spontaneous draws on my energy impede my ability to do those. People honouring my request to not disturb is what makes all of it possible for me.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Imma on September 18, 2018, 08:12:35 AM
When we remodeled our house four years ago, we took out the doorbell apparatus and didn't replace it. I now consider doorbells to be uninvited noise pollution.

That's an interesting development.  Do you think it's a sign of just how electronically interconnected we have become that we no longer feel any compulsion to even respond to an in-person visitation at your home?  There was a time not so long ago when you might literally never see another human being over the course of a week if your farmhouse didn't have a doorbell. 

What about the neighbor who needs to borrow a cup of sugar?  Your pastor dropping by to ask about your aging parents?  The kids next door who want to ride bikes with your kids?  The matronly lady up the block who heard you were sick and brought you some cookies?  Have we really become so callous to the pleasantries of face to face interactions that we deliberately choose to remove opportunities to have them? 

When I was a kid I use to have to go around ringing doorbells in my neighborhood once a month to collect the monthly checks from everyone on my paper route.  Imagine that severity of the cultural shift between then and now, that my kids understand no part of that sentence.  Maybe they can live without doorbells, but I sure couldn't.

My doorbell broke a few years ago and I've been too lazy to fix or replace it. Everyone knocks now - all the neighbours, all our friends, the mail delivery drivers. In summer we just leave front doors wide open in our street.

The kind of interactions you describe, I recognize them from my childhood, but that just doesn't happen anymore. I lived in a village and everyone knew each other and was related somehow. All mums stayed at home and everyone just walked in through the kitchen door (and I'm talking about the early 90s, not the 70s or something). But society has changed. We hardly ever get uninvited guests. We don't go to church. Shops are open almost around the clock so no one comes around for eggs or a cup of sugar. People are busy, they move around a lot, by the time you've finally picked a date to visit your new neighbours, they're moving out already.

I think it's boring to live in a community with so little social contact, but I also don't see how we could change society back to how it was. I'm guilty too: I don't have kids, I work outside of the home. I've tried to get in touch with neighbours but most of them don't seem interested at all.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: wenchsenior on September 18, 2018, 08:57:23 AM
When we remodeled our house four years ago, we took out the doorbell apparatus and didn't replace it. I now consider doorbells to be uninvited noise pollution.

That's an interesting development.  Do you think it's a sign of just how electronically interconnected we have become that we no longer feel any compulsion to even respond to an in-person visitation at your home?  There was a time not so long ago when you might literally never see another human being over the course of a week if your farmhouse didn't have a doorbell. 

What about the neighbor who needs to borrow a cup of sugar?  Your pastor dropping by to ask about your aging parents?  The kids next door who want to ride bikes with your kids?  The matronly lady up the block who heard you were sick and brought you some cookies?  Have we really become so callous to the pleasantries of face to face interactions that we deliberately choose to remove opportunities to have them? 

When I was a kid I use to have to go around ringing doorbells in my neighborhood once a month to collect the monthly checks from everyone on my paper route.  Imagine that severity of the cultural shift between then and now, that my kids understand no part of that sentence.  Maybe they can live without doorbells, but I sure couldn't.

These examples are intriguing.  I think I might be older than Sol, but I can count on 2 hands the number of times these sorts of interactions have occurred in my lifetime (that includes Ye Olden Days when people supposedly did these things).  This includes living in a small town, 2 very large cities, and 2 small/medium sized cities.

I've never experienced any of Sol's specific examples, unless you count the tendency of very close friends to drop by to visit for an hour as part of regular routes of errands...which did happen with one of my mom's/my friends when I was a kid.  Or the fact that I regularly have to knock on neighbors' doors to drop off mis-delivered mail (our postal worker has ISSUES).

The only 'knocking on doors/ringing doorbells' that I've ever regularly experienced is people selling things (ugh); trick or treaters; or very occasionally people needing to use my phone b/c their car broke down, etc (back in the pre cell phone days)...I also have knocked on doors once or twice for this type of reason...need to use someone's phone in an emergency.

I'm wondering if 1) Sol's type of example was ever as common as pop culture makes it out; or 2) if it was, when did it start to die out?  I do think my Grandparents experienced this type of thing more often, but my impression was that was the last generation that did, in America anyway.

This might also be a question of proportion of introverts to extroverts in any given neighborhood...as an introvert, I would always assume knocking on a neighbor's door would be unwelcome, except in an emergency.  Maybe I just have always lived in neighborhoods with high relative numbers of introverts?
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Cool Friend on September 18, 2018, 08:58:59 AM
Nothing novel that hasn't been said already but, for the sake of contributing:

I don't understand digital books and do not like them.  Any opportunity to get away from a screen is a welcome one.   I don't like audiobooks either. The appeal of reading for me is that it's peaceful, quiet, and I can do it at whatever pace I want.  The only situation I could imagine listening to an audiobook is while driving, but I don't drive or have a car, so...

I'd say hand-washing dishes but it's not exactly voluntary, I just haven't lived in a place equipped with one in a long time.  I wouldn't mind the convenience if it happened to already be installed, but I probably wouldn't opt to buy one.

Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: sol on September 18, 2018, 09:11:52 AM
This might also be a question of proportion of introverts to extroverts in any given neighborhood...as an introvert, I would always assume knocking on a neighbor's door would be unwelcome, except in an emergency.  Maybe I just have always lived in neighborhoods with high relative numbers of introverts?

Can an entire community be introverted?  I really think this is a function of the character of your neighborhood, more than of the individuals that comprise that neighborhood.  Yes, the two are certainly related, but in some places people habitually lock their doors because they worry about crime, and look at strangers with suspicion, and I don't think it's because those people are natural introverts.

Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: cerat0n1a on September 18, 2018, 10:09:54 AM
Imagine that severity of the cultural shift between then and now, that my kids understand no part of that sentence.  Maybe they can live without doorbells, but I sure couldn't.

I live somewhere where people routinely walk to the shops and people typically say hello to passers-by in the street. We often have neighbours or friends ring the doorbell uninvited (and I suspect most of the people on either side of the door in these interactions are introverts.) The doorbell certainly gets more use than the landline phone.

My teenage children & friends consider it somewhat rude to ring the doorbell - the normal approach is to stand outside and text the person inside to tell them that you're at their house. (Where "text" may mean snapchat, whatsapp etc.)
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: OtherJen on September 18, 2018, 10:37:20 AM
When we remodeled our house four years ago, we took out the doorbell apparatus and didn't replace it. I now consider doorbells to be uninvited noise pollution.

That's an interesting development.  Do you think it's a sign of just how electronically interconnected we have become that we no longer feel any compulsion to even respond to an in-person visitation at your home?  There was a time not so long ago when you might literally never see another human being over the course of a week if your farmhouse didn't have a doorbell. 

What about the neighbor who needs to borrow a cup of sugar?  Your pastor dropping by to ask about your aging parents?  The kids next door who want to ride bikes with your kids?  The matronly lady up the block who heard you were sick and brought you some cookies?  Have we really become so callous to the pleasantries of face to face interactions that we deliberately choose to remove opportunities to have them? 

When I was a kid I use to have to go around ringing doorbells in my neighborhood once a month to collect the monthly checks from everyone on my paper route.  Imagine that severity of the cultural shift between then and now, that my kids understand no part of that sentence.  Maybe they can live without doorbells, but I sure couldn't.

These examples are intriguing.  I think I might be older than Sol, but I can count on 2 hands the number of times these sorts of interactions have occurred in my lifetime (that includes Ye Olden Days when people supposedly did these things).  This includes living in a small town, 2 very large cities, and 2 small/medium sized cities.

I've never experienced any of Sol's specific examples, unless you count the tendency of very close friends to drop by to visit for an hour as part of regular routes of errands...which did happen with one of my mom's/my friends when I was a kid.  Or the fact that I regularly have to knock on neighbors' doors to drop off mis-delivered mail (our postal worker has ISSUES).

The only 'knocking on doors/ringing doorbells' that I've ever regularly experienced is people selling things (ugh); trick or treaters; or very occasionally people needing to use my phone b/c their car broke down, etc (back in the pre cell phone days)...I also have knocked on doors once or twice for this type of reason...need to use someone's phone in an emergency.

I'm wondering if 1) Sol's type of example was ever as common as pop culture makes it out; or 2) if it was, when did it start to die out?  I do think my Grandparents experienced this type of thing more often, but my impression was that was the last generation that did, in America anyway.

This might also be a question of proportion of introverts to extroverts in any given neighborhood...as an introvert, I would always assume knocking on a neighbor's door would be unwelcome, except in an emergency.  Maybe I just have always lived in neighborhoods with high relative numbers of introverts?

Solís example sounds like my parentsí childhood neighborhoods (theyíre early Boomers who grew up in the 50s/60s, but my experience as a kid in the 1980s was nothing like that. The only reason we knew the neighbors was because I played with their kids; when we moved to a neighborhood with fewer kids, we hardly ever saw the neighbors.

Our house didnít have a doorbell when we bought it 15 years ago. Itís tiny; we can hear when people knock. No sense in wasting money to install an electronic noisemaker.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: sol on September 18, 2018, 10:59:40 AM
Our house didnít have a doorbell when we bought it 15 years ago. Itís tiny; we can hear when people knock. No sense in wasting money to install an electronic noisemaker.

Victorian houses had physical bells activated by pull wires or crankshafts, which presumably sounded more pleasant than the modern electronic version.  Would that qualify as something you might choose to do "analog/off-grid/unplugged"?
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: OtherJen on September 18, 2018, 11:46:52 AM
Our house didnít have a doorbell when we bought it 15 years ago. Itís tiny; we can hear when people knock. No sense in wasting money to install an electronic noisemaker.

Victorian houses had physical bells activated by pull wires or crankshafts, which presumably sounded more pleasant than the modern electronic version.  Would that qualify as something you might choose to do "analog/off-grid/unplugged"?

My house is less than 1000 square feet and all on one floor. Why would I need to add something when I can hear a knock from any room?
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Retire-Canada on September 18, 2018, 12:55:57 PM
We don't have a doorbell. And we pretty much don't care when people knock on the front door. Because all our friends come around to the back door.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Gondolin on September 18, 2018, 01:35:22 PM
Analog alarm clock and no phones in the bedroom.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: spokey doke on September 18, 2018, 03:54:32 PM
Backpacking in the wilderness
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: pressure9pa on September 19, 2018, 06:08:53 AM
I wear a mechanical watch.  It is inferior to a modern quartz watch in every way; less accurate, less durable, more difficult to produce, and with fewer features.  But it is pretty, and I like the history of old timepieces.

After centuries of technological progress in horology, it represents the pinnacle of achievement of a totally dead technology, like the finest buggy whip, or a wooden sailboat.


I wear one was well, and I appreciate the history.  Mine belonged to my grandfather, and is engraved with a thank-you note from his company upon his retirement.  I know that my grandfather worked there his entire career, and missed only two days of work - one when my father was born and one when he was hospitalized.  The lack of technology and the reminder of my grandfather make it a pleasure to wear and a good reminder of his values. 
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Nickyd£g on September 19, 2018, 06:23:49 AM
Hand wash & dry dishes, line dry clothes, budget using paper and pen. i read on my tablet occasionally but prefer real books. Real alarm clock, mobile phones disrupt my sleep.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Schaefer Light on September 19, 2018, 07:30:19 AM
I like the idea of not having a doorbell.  Might have to disconnect mine now.  I had never even thought of it prior to reading this post.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: StarBright on September 19, 2018, 07:33:43 AM
I am militantly anti-smart phone (and I am a millennial) so I still do a lot of paper: directions, grocery lists, journaling etc.  I listen to a kitchen radio (though it is on the fritz and we may move to a smart speaker soon), and we walk the kiddo to school in the mornings.

Ohh - I also make my own pasta and pie crusts from scratch and we make popcorn using a whirly-pop! The whole family enjoys making pasta together.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 19, 2018, 07:42:16 AM
Oh, light switches! My house has mostly normal ones, but for some reason one room is on a sensor and timer. Drives me nuts. I donít need or want a light to come on every time I walk into a given room. I can also function in daylight, by feel, by memory, etc, and flick a switch when I actually need light.

I put a piece of black tape over the sensor to stop it.

Yes, popcorn in a pot too, kneading by hand, etc :)
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: thd7t on September 19, 2018, 08:17:15 AM
I like reading graphic novels (comic books) which I get from the library. Really good ones can be as good as watching movies except there's no cost beyond what you already pay in library taxes. Right now, I'm reading a series by Brian Michael Bendis and Michael Gaydos called "Alias" which was adapted into a Netflix TV series called "Jessica Jones". It's riveting stuff that explores some really complex issues about violence and identity.

Bendis is one of the best comic writers currently active.  Not sure if I'd put him or Brian K Vaughn at the top.
They're good for long runs (and I'd take Bendis over Vaughan), but Warren Ellis is better (weirder).
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 20, 2018, 07:55:16 AM
Visiting new places/experiencing new things -

I donít want to pull out a phone to find which curve to take in a new town. I want to walk one, see if I get where I was aiming for or not. At most, I want to ask someone I bump into for the next direction.

I donít want to watch a video or even read a book about where Iím going. I want to get off a plane or boat and be surprised!

When I meet people that speak languages different than mine, I donít want to use an app that will translate one of us; I want to rely on other forms of communication -eyes, gestures, sounds, touch- to connect...or just listen and enjoy not knowing.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: RetiredAt63 on September 20, 2018, 08:24:24 AM
My main hobby (fibre arts) is analog.  The only motor I have that is involved is the motor on my drum carder.  I wash fleece by hand and air dry it, I spin on a spinning wheel, not an e-wheel, I knit on knitting needles, not a knitting machine, and I weave on looms that are totally manual.

Gardening is also pretty un-plugged, although I do use the lawn tractor for hauling soil, etc., and that means I am using a gasoline motor.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: sol on September 20, 2018, 09:30:41 AM
I donít want to watch a video or even read a book about where Iím going. I want to get off a plane or boat and be surprised!

About twenty years ago, I walked off a plane at the Kathmandu airport at 11pm without any preparation.  I had just come from a three day party in Australia and flown with a wretched hangover.  No guide book, no currency, no plan.  I felt alive!  I was seizing the moment!

Then I realized that the Kathmandu airport had no electricity, it was dark, I had no money to pay for a taxi into town, didn't speak the language, and didn't know where a taxi might take me anyway.  I was seizing the moment, and the moment kind of sucked.  Sometimes just winging it doesn't work out.

I was lucky.  A nice British lady took pity on the stupid American kid and took him into town and gave him a place to stay until the banks opened the next morning.  Since that day, I try to read a book about where I'm going, so that I have something that at least sort of looks like a plan. 

Back then, everyone was carrying a Lonely Planet for guidance but I imagine it's all online these days.  I do agree with you that the places mentioned in the guidebooks tend to get swamped by tourists, and you can miss the real gems in a new location if you stick to the printed recommendations like everyone else does.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 20, 2018, 09:35:02 AM
Oh yes, much of my travel has involved moments like the one you describe in Kathmandu. Dark, no local currency, nowhere to stay, transport shut down for the night. And then we figure it out, or simply survive a night of hardship, or a stranger helps us... Happy!

...though I kind of hope my kid doesnít follow in my footsteps, ha.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Cassie on September 20, 2018, 09:47:50 AM
I use paper calendars and lists. I hang dry all my tops and bras.  I have finally embraced boos and newspapers online because they are so much cheaper and easier to carry around. The neighbor kids ring our doorbell when their ball flies over the fence. We had so many people selling crap and making the dogs bark that I bought a big grumpy cat sign with him showing his middle paw saying no soliciting. The few people that have rang to sell me something I ask them if they canít read or are just stupid. Then I wait for a response while they mutter something as they run away. The sign is so big you can see it from the sidewalk.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Imma on September 20, 2018, 12:51:00 PM
When we remodeled our house four years ago, we took out the doorbell apparatus and didn't replace it. I now consider doorbells to be uninvited noise pollution.

That's an interesting development.  Do you think it's a sign of just how electronically interconnected we have become that we no longer feel any compulsion to even respond to an in-person visitation at your home?  There was a time not so long ago when you might literally never see another human being over the course of a week if your farmhouse didn't have a doorbell. 

What about the neighbor who needs to borrow a cup of sugar?  Your pastor dropping by to ask about your aging parents?  The kids next door who want to ride bikes with your kids?  The matronly lady up the block who heard you were sick and brought you some cookies?  Have we really become so callous to the pleasantries of face to face interactions that we deliberately choose to remove opportunities to have them? 

When I was a kid I use to have to go around ringing doorbells in my neighborhood once a month to collect the monthly checks from everyone on my paper route.  Imagine that severity of the cultural shift between then and now, that my kids understand no part of that sentence.  Maybe they can live without doorbells, but I sure couldn't.

These examples are intriguing.  I think I might be older than Sol, but I can count on 2 hands the number of times these sorts of interactions have occurred in my lifetime (that includes Ye Olden Days when people supposedly did these things).  This includes living in a small town, 2 very large cities, and 2 small/medium sized cities.

I've never experienced any of Sol's specific examples, unless you count the tendency of very close friends to drop by to visit for an hour as part of regular routes of errands...which did happen with one of my mom's/my friends when I was a kid.  Or the fact that I regularly have to knock on neighbors' doors to drop off mis-delivered mail (our postal worker has ISSUES).

The only 'knocking on doors/ringing doorbells' that I've ever regularly experienced is people selling things (ugh); trick or treaters; or very occasionally people needing to use my phone b/c their car broke down, etc (back in the pre cell phone days)...I also have knocked on doors once or twice for this type of reason...need to use someone's phone in an emergency.

I'm wondering if 1) Sol's type of example was ever as common as pop culture makes it out; or 2) if it was, when did it start to die out?  I do think my Grandparents experienced this type of thing more often, but my impression was that was the last generation that did, in America anyway.


Well, I recognize them and I grew up in the 90s, I'm not even 30 yet.

I did grow up in a village in Europe. People didn't actually rign our doorbell because everyone just let themselves in through the back door. Since we lived on a smallholding people didn't come by for a cup of sugar, but they came around asking for eggs, soup chickens, fruit and vegetables all the time. We also received stale bread from the local bakery that he would dump in our driveway every morning, to feed the chickens.

We weren't frequent churchgoers, so the pastor didn't drop by our house, but well-meaning neighbourhood ladies definitely did. The ladies in the street always collected money for flowers or fruit baskets whenever someone was ill, had surgery, had a baby, lost their job, etc. Whenever a house was sold, we'd decorate it for the new owners and put up a sign saying 'welcome in the neighbourhood'. We also decorated houses for weddings, wedding anniversaries and new babies. I played with all the neighbourhood kids and when I got a little bit older, I watched all the younger kids for pocket money. Every year at christmas, the paper boy would ring the door bell to wish us a happy christmas and we'd give him a tip.

My childhood wasn't as idyllic as this story makes it sound, but this super close-knit community was absolutely real. I'm sure it's still a bit like that in villages, but I live in the city these days and I miss it.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 20, 2018, 03:27:26 PM
That sounds so beautiful, Imma!

I spent the last year living in a place designated a village, and those things didn't happen. I spent the few years before that in a hamlet, and those didn't happen there either. Some years previous to that I was in a different hamlet (fewer than 100 ppl) where this was the dream, but it didn't happen there either. Beautiful, progressive places but not infiltrate-y.

One of my in-laws is from a different village (in a different part of the world) and everyone and their chickens just wander in and out of each other's houses.

Where it happened for me was, interestingly, in two cities (very different parts of the world). In each case, I had happened to land in a subculture of this...of organically-developed, true community. These kind arise naturally, carry on for up to a few years, and eventually dissolve. Then we find it again somewhere else, or not.

I suspect it's more cultural than generational, geographical, etc.

I enjoy it very much when that kind of contact is my whole life vs a unique interruption in a very different lifestyle. I love my current gig, too, so I can happily go either way -just not some painful thing in between.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: BDWW on September 20, 2018, 04:15:55 PM
Lots, design/draft and furniture building.

I used to use sketch-up quite a bit, but it kept changing slightly, and changed ownership, and generally became too much work.  Now I draw plans and perspectives in a journal by hand. It's always there for reference, and a lot easier to lug around when working.

I also do a lot of work by hand because it's often more efficient(or at least as efficient) for one-off pieces. I do use a table saw, band saw and planer for rough millwork, but most of the joinery is at least finessed by hand.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: middo on September 20, 2018, 06:12:24 PM
I haven't had a clothes dryer for 20 years.

I love reading books - not on a device, but hard copy.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: sanderh on September 20, 2018, 06:21:42 PM
What's something you voluntarily do analog or off-grid or unplugged as an intentional downshift or money saver or just because it's more fun?

Examples would be a clothesline vs electric drier, bicycle vs car, etc.
Clothesline, wash dishes by hand, bicycle, disposable razor reused for a month instead of electric.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: MishMash on September 20, 2018, 06:38:55 PM
We harvest the bulk of our food, hunting, fishing, foraging (20lbs of chanterelles this week alone) I grocery shop maybe once or twice a month
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: jengod on September 20, 2018, 09:42:06 PM
We harvest the bulk of our food, hunting, fishing, foraging (20lbs of chanterelles this week alone) I grocery shop maybe once or twice a month

WOW! Where do you live?
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: MishMash on September 21, 2018, 08:08:10 AM
We harvest the bulk of our food, hunting, fishing, foraging (20lbs of chanterelles this week alone) I grocery shop maybe once or twice a month

WOW! Where do you live?

Maryland, right outside of DC believe it or not, there are a TON of areas within an hour or so drive that allow you to get outdoors.  And we have areas we can hunt across the country as well.  We caught over a full bushel of crabs last weekend for the cost of a pack of chicken drumsticks in MD.  With all the rain this year the mushrooms are EVERYWHERE and the container garden is doing well, so our total cost for eating the last seven days was about 5 dollars, most of that was the cost of the chicken legs for bait.

We also do a lot of bartering with folks we know, we process everything by ourselves, to include making our own venison and boar sausages etc, so other people give us their deer to process, and we take a 25% cut and return the rest to them in the form of pre made burgers, sausages, jerky etc.  And we also trade them, and the seafood we catch for other food.  This week it was 5lbs of Alaskan King salmon and some moose meat for some crabs and mushrooms from a buddy that just came back from Alaska.  Next week we are getting a crap ton of Berkshire pork from a friend as "payment" for going over his financial plan last month. 
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 21, 2018, 08:26:47 AM
Love it, MishMash! :)
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Vibrissae on September 21, 2018, 01:19:51 PM
My teenage children & friends consider it somewhat rude to ring the doorbell - the normal approach is to stand outside and text the person inside to tell them that you're at their house. (Where "text" may mean snapchat, whatsapp etc.)


This is a revelation to me! I have a friend who does this, and I just thought it was weird, but apparently it's a generational/cultural thing.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: joonifloofeefloo on September 21, 2018, 01:36:24 PM
^ I'm almost 50 and it's my preference (to receive and to offer) too :)
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: PlainsWalker on September 21, 2018, 02:39:10 PM
Pay bills by check.

    Other members of my generation look at me like I have an extra arm growing out of my head when they see the check book. I work on payment processing systems for a living and I've seen the sausage factory so to speak. A check is a payment instrument that carries the most consumer protections with it of any payment method. That and for some reason a few of my utilities want to charge me a convenience fee to pay electronically. I recalcitrantly decline to pay for the convenience of using a payment method that costs them far less than processing the paper.
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: jengod on September 22, 2018, 08:00:54 PM
We harvest the bulk of our food, hunting, fishing, foraging (20lbs of chanterelles this week alone) I grocery shop maybe once or twice a month

WOW! Where do you live?

Maryland, right outside of DC believe it or not, there are a TON of areas within an hour or so drive that allow you to get outdoors.  And we have areas we can hunt across the country as well.  We caught over a full bushel of crabs last weekend for the cost of a pack of chicken drumsticks in MD.  With all the rain this year the mushrooms are EVERYWHERE and the container garden is doing well, so our total cost for eating the last seven days was about 5 dollars, most of that was the cost of the chicken legs for bait.

We also do a lot of bartering with folks we know, we process everything by ourselves, to include making our own venison and boar sausages etc, so other people give us their deer to process, and we take a 25% cut and return the rest to them in the form of pre made burgers, sausages, jerky etc.  And we also trade them, and the seafood we catch for other food.  This week it was 5lbs of Alaskan King salmon and some moose meat for some crabs and mushrooms from a buddy that just came back from Alaska.  Next week we are getting a crap ton of Berkshire pork from a friend as "payment" for going over his financial plan last month.

Well done, you!
Title: Re: What's something you voluntarily do analog/off-grid/unplugged?
Post by: Shinplaster on September 23, 2018, 09:28:30 AM
Brace and bit instead of a power drill for smaller jobs.  I love the precision, being able to totally control the speed, and no batteries to go dead.

I like paper maps better than using GPS.  That might be a result of Garmin once trying to send me into a river.  I plan my routes using paper, and then use the GPS only if it concurs with my paper maps.   I love the old CAA Triptik maps too.