Author Topic: Washing Machine Shutoff Valves  (Read 2421 times)

Civex

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Washing Machine Shutoff Valves
« on: July 11, 2016, 08:36:06 PM »
Ok,

This post is 50% rant and 50% fairly legitimate question. I will start with the question, and feel free to skip the rant:

1.) Why the hell do people build houses where the only way to replace a defective water line valve on a washing machine is to cut open the wall? Seriously, about the dumbest thing I have ever encountered that is, "that's just how it's done" when I question more knowledgeable people. We had a new washing machine installed- they broke the valve when replacing the lines. After it flooded the laundry room, the appliance store informed me that, "it sounds like a plumbing problem, not a problem with the appliance-sorry." So, now I'm cutting open the wall so that I can remove the old valve.

And the rant:

2.) Why do people hold themselves and services/products/etc. to such a poor standard?! First that the, "local, hometown, friendly" appliance store I purchased these overpriced pieces of metal from won't repair something that their techs broke; secondly, why would you install such cheap (read plastic bits) on a a part of plumbing that is built into the wall,which I look at as should last the lifetime of the house; thirdly, why the worthless, plastic outlet box- it provides almost zero support for the valves or the water lines, and was another thing cracked by the techs.

Arghh- 5 hours, 2 trips to 2 different hardware stores, and all I have managed to do is stop the water from spraying all over my laundry room. Tomorrow I will decide if I will make an additional trip and try to finish the repair, or call a plumber. There are likely many typos because I skipped supper to try and finish this project before the stores closed and can't think worth a damn with low blood sugar.

Metric Mouse

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Re: Washing Machine Shutoff Valves
« Reply #1 on: July 12, 2016, 12:57:36 AM »
The way things are done, and the way they should be done, are often two different things...

RetiredAt63

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Re: Washing Machine Shutoff Valves
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2016, 07:32:49 AM »
Oh yes so much this.  When I was doing repairs to my laundry room I had the shut-off valves moved from behind a closet (who puts a closet in front of shut-off valves) to right over the washing machine.  Easy turn-off now.  I also replaced the hoses (good thing, one was in bad shape, but I couldn't tell because it was behind the closet).

I also added a laundry tub.  Life in the country (gardening, etc.) gets clothes dirty enough that sometimes they need to soak.

This is not rocket science - my parents' very basic house in the 1950's had shut-off valves in a sensible place and a laundry sink.  Of course at my grandmother's even older house the laundry tub was where the rinse water from the washing machine went, to be used as wash water for the next load.  People didn't waste hot water that was clean if a bit soapy.

acroy

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Re: Washing Machine Shutoff Valves
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2016, 08:28:02 AM »
Cheap fast slap-dash build quality, looks good when new and will last 3-5yrs.
By then the builder is long gone and does not care. The builder is in competition with other builders to deliver the biggest most-impressive looking house for the $$. Most buyers are not looking too hard at the laundry room ;)
My first house was in a small tract built by a guy who had worked in the industry for a looong time and had learned how to include many nice little cost-effective but valuable features. The laundry room had nice metal fixtures. The floor was tile and gently sloped to a drain (!) which went outside the house. How bout that! what a nice little feature. Closet lights activated by door switches (that really spoiled us). Every single door in the house was non-interference with every single other door.  And this was on a $100k starter 1500sq ft house. It was a great little place.

MrsPete

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Re: Washing Machine Shutoff Valves
« Reply #4 on: July 12, 2016, 08:35:13 AM »
The answer to this question is simple, but not smart:

- Builders slap up houses as quickly and cheaply as possible, which means cutting corners on things like you're mentioning. 
- New homeowners pay more attention to the HGTV trinity -- hardwood floors, stainless steel appliances, granite (or quartz or marble) countertops -- instead of quality construction.

Nate R

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Re: Washing Machine Shutoff Valves
« Reply #5 on: July 12, 2016, 08:44:39 AM »
Bingo. It's about initial cost.


Civex

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Re: Washing Machine Shutoff Valves
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2016, 10:04:53 AM »
Well,

I ended up replacing the valves. We haven't decided if we are going to place an access panel over the hole in the wall for future access, or patch the drywall and paint. We have to paint either way- the water ran down the wall wrecking the paint- but luckily doesn't seem to have gotten into the wall. Going to keep an eye on my plumbing and run a dehumidifier for a few weeks.

Such a weird house- some things were done very, very well; the original owner worked in the building industry (think plumbing, lumber, or electrical supply owner,) but other things were just very cheaply or poorly done. I almost wonder if he didn't contract out most of the house, and maybe do some of the less professional work himself. IDK.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Washing Machine Shutoff Valves
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2016, 10:22:19 AM »
If I hadn't put my valves outside the wall (a bit ugly but effective) I would have put in a panel. You want the valves easily accessible.