Author Topic: Treasury EE bonds  (Read 411 times)

I'm a red panda

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Treasury EE bonds
« on: September 17, 2018, 10:29:30 AM »
Can someone explain to  me the convert paper treasury bonds to electronic?  My bank no longer takes them.

Am I reading write that I still need to take them all to the bank and have someone there certify the signature?
They've told me they no longer do anything with treasury bonds- can a notary do that? Or does it have to be a bank officer?

FiveSigmas

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Re: Treasury EE bonds
« Reply #1 on: September 17, 2018, 11:20:01 AM »
No need to go to a bank -- you can do the whole thing via the website and USPS. The instructions are here:

https://www.treasurydirect.gov/indiv/research/indepth/smartexchangeinfo.htm

It's a slightly complicated process, but if you follow every step carefully, it's no big deal. The whole thing, from mailing the bonds in to your online account being credited, takes a couple weeks.

Setting up a treasurydirect.gov used to be an experience in and of itself (involving, among other things, them mailing you a secret decoder ring authentication card). I believe the process has been streamlined a bit (although their logon procedure is still.. unique).

Note that the instructions accompanying the "manifest" you have to print out explicitly state that you not sign any of the paper bonds. Not sure what happens in this case.

I'm a red panda

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Re: Treasury EE bonds
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2018, 11:26:01 AM »
No need to go to a bank -- you can do the whole thing via the website and USPS. The instructions are here:

https://www.treasurydirect.gov/indiv/research/indepth/smartexchangeinfo.htm

It's a slightly complicated process, but if you follow every step carefully, it's no big deal. The whole thing, from mailing the bonds in to your online account being credited, takes a couple weeks.

Setting up a treasurydirect.gov used to be an experience in and of itself (involving, among other things, them mailing you a secret decoder ring authentication card). I believe the process has been streamlined a bit (although their logon procedure is still.. unique).

Note that the instructions accompanying the "manifest" you have to print out explicitly state that you not sign any of the paper bonds. Not sure what happens in this case.

This website is SO confusing.

Here is where it made it seem like I needed to have a bank officer sign:
https://www.treasurydirect.gov/indiv/research/indepth/ebonds/res_e_bonds_eeredeem.htm

So the difference is converting vs. redeeming.

Looks like you are having me convert; and then from there I can redeem.

Clear as mud. Thanks for the help.

FiveSigmas

  • Bristles
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Re: Treasury EE bonds
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2018, 11:37:53 AM »
Oh. If you want to redeem, the treasury recommends that you not go through the electronic conversion process and instead follow the process you link to. I'm afraid I'm no help in that case, as I've never done it myself.

I'm a red panda

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Re: Treasury EE bonds
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2018, 11:40:03 AM »
It sounds like the conversion process is easier though, if it doesn't require me to go to an actual bank.

I don't need to redeem them today, just eventually!

FiveSigmas

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Re: Treasury EE bonds
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2018, 11:52:33 AM »
Can someone explain to  me the convert paper treasury bonds to electronic?  My bank no longer takes them.

Am I reading write that I still need to take them all to the bank and have someone there certify the signature?
They've told me they no longer do anything with treasury bonds- can a notary do that? Or does it have to be a bank officer?

Oh, to this point: I suspect you really will need an officer at an established financial institution. If what the treasury is really asking for is a Medallion Signature Guarantee, a notary won't cut it. Even if your bank won't redeem your bonds, though, they're probably still willing and able to sign the document for you. I would call them up and ask.