Author Topic: treadmill advice  (Read 2480 times)

Bradfurd

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treadmill advice
« on: January 13, 2017, 07:43:53 AM »
I really want a treadmill for my basement when outdoor conditions make running outside dangerous/impossible.

Any recommendations on make/model/mustachian ways to achieve this goal? I would love to take ownership of a free functioning treadmill that someone just wants to get rid of, but I am aware that may not happen.

New? Used? How much to spend to get a good reliable treadmill for running? Will a budget friendly model be likely to quit on me in a couple of years? Should I just go outside even when it's 5 degrees and my road with no shoulder is covered in ice?

Thanks in advance!

MayDay

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2017, 08:26:25 AM »
My H uses one every day in the winter.

We weren't able to find a decent one used. We weren't interested in a 200$ Walmart special that wobbled like mad.

I read some reviews and we ended up getting an older model year Nordic track in the 800$ range. I think Nordic track is owned by proform.

All the silly features are nonsense in my opinion. You do want something sturdy enough to run on though.

The thing suuuuuuuucks to move.

Bradfurd

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2017, 08:34:14 AM »
I have looked at the ~$200-$300 Wal-Mart and Amazon specials, and I can't get myself to do it...I think I would regret it. So you bought a new treadmill, but a previous year's model to save bucks?

Thanks for the insight!

AZDude

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2017, 08:36:08 AM »
I bought a manual treadmill online for about $60. Can't beat that. It works fine, other than being somewhat noisy(makes watching TV or listening to music difficult without headphones).

MayDay

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2017, 08:42:51 AM »
I have looked at the ~$200-$300 Wal-Mart and Amazon specials, and I can't get myself to do it...I think I would regret it. So you bought a new treadmill, but a previous year's model to save bucks?

Thanks for the insight!

Yup.

Yes, it's expensive, but like I said, H uses it an hour a day. We are rural-ish with no gum options too close, so it's worth not having a 20 min one way drive to a gym.

If we lived close to one of those 20$ a month gyms, I'd rather do the gym.

For us, a year of daily use on a treadmill we own is cheaper than the ~60$/month Y.

I personally walk outside in most weather, but H won't. Health >> $.

momcpa

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2017, 08:58:20 AM »
I bought a new Nordic track after my last treadmill just decided to quit.  I use the treadmill almost everyday.   I don't need all the bells and whistles like it has.  But I was interested in it having a WIDE belt.  I'm a little older, and didn't need the extra chance of falling off, stepping off, etc unintentionally.

I opted for a new one for a couple reasons.  I didn't want one that I didn't know the history of......lots of use, a HEAVY user, etc.   I never would have thought about the weight of a person until both my grown son and son-in-law tried to use my treadmill (at different times!) and both commented that it seemed to 'stutter' when their foot hit the surface.  Both are good size men, but neither huge.

The cost of it was a splurge for me and my husband, but I don't really have other 'vices', so investing in a good 'vice' that I use constantly, was okay by us.  And I know from experience that I would use it.  If you're not sure it's going to be used as exercise equipment, or a coat hanger.....maybe start with a used one.

I've been using a treadmill for 4 or 5 years.  Crazy as it sounds, I'm kinda addicted to it.  It's been MAJOR keeping my weight consistent and a good de-stressor after work.

And YES....it was extremely heavy to move into the house !!!!!!!!! We should have enlisted a couple high school guys to help us.

Mr Saver 2000

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2017, 09:11:31 AM »
before i was aware of the MMM ways a few years ago my wife convinced me she needed to get a $1000 Nordic track treadmill.  In the past 4 years I doubt she has put 50 miles on it.  If you are going to spend the money and invest in a good one be sure that you will actually want to use it.

I am a runner as well but hate treadmills and would rather run outside in 20 degrees than inside on a treadmill. So if you have never ran on a treadmill, I would maybe test a few out at a gym before you buy one to see if you like how a treadmill feels vs running outside.

Cwadda

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2017, 09:17:41 AM »
Part of mustachianism is reducing consumerism in order to reduce environmental impact. Buying a new treadmill, regardless of the price, is unmustachian to me. All of that metal, plastic, and all of those fossil fuels used in production.

There are plenty out there used that you can get for cheap or free.

jamaicaspanish

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2017, 09:26:25 AM »
I scoured Craigslist for months before pulling the trigger.
Do your research on Consumer Reports to find the better brands.
Do the research to know what minimum specs will work for your planned use.
And then keep an eye out for a bargain.  I wouldn't pay more than 50% of new price for a used treadmill.
And they are heavy. Disassembling and moving a treadmill can be done with two people, but having an extra person or two would make the job much easier.
Humblebrag: I bought a used True for $250. Previous owner was a 110 pound woman who only used it on rainy weekends. It's practically new :)

Midwest

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2017, 09:41:46 AM »
I'm 160 pounds and managed to break the frame on a $400 or $500 horizon treadmill from dicks.  They warrantied and I got the $1000+ model.  The new one has been great. No way I would buy a cheap walmart model.  The only repair in 10 years I've done to the new one is a drive belt.

I wouldn't waste my money on a cheap one.  Either buy used or pay up.  Assuming you buy quality, motors, belts and electronics can be replaced on the quality treadmills.  There are used out there if you look.

Personally working out inside is awful.  But when the weather is awful, it's a necessary evil.  When it's cold, dark and wet, I'm using the treadmill.

There are several sites that review treadmills.  You might check those out.

Bradfurd

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2017, 09:51:03 AM »
Thanks to everyone! I really appreciate the feedback.

I am an active runner, 165#, who has experience running on fancy gym treadmills and very basic residential models that are loud and quaky. I just want it for the sweat...I don't mind staring at a concrete block wall while I run. I know it will get used. I have a somewhat mustachian gym in my unfinished basement (joist mounted pull up bar, adjustable dumbbells (5# - 52.5#) and a Bowflex that was given to us.

I really want to be low cost with this, but I have some legitimate concerns, which have been echoed here, about throwing $100 into a used and rickety money pit.

I also found a commercial model up for grabs close to me on a government liquidation site with a starting bid of $15, but it isn't in working condition. Would it be worth it to purchase, even though I have no clue what is wrong with it? It is a Life Fitness 9100HR.

Thanks again!

Midwest

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2017, 09:57:55 AM »
Thanks to everyone! I really appreciate the feedback.

I am an active runner, 165#, who has experience running on fancy gym treadmills and very basic residential models that are loud and quaky. I just want it for the sweat...I don't mind staring at a concrete block wall while I run. I know it will get used. I have a somewhat mustachian gym in my unfinished basement (joist mounted pull up bar, adjustable dumbbells (5# - 52.5#) and a Bowflex that was given to us.

I really want to be low cost with this, but I have some legitimate concerns, which have been echoed here, about throwing $100 into a used and rickety money pit.

I also found a commercial model up for grabs close to me on a government liquidation site with a starting bid of $15, but it isn't in working condition. Would it be worth it to purchase, even though I have no clue what is wrong with it? It is a Life Fitness 9100HR.

Thanks again!

You might look @ e-bay for parts costs before bidding.  If the board and or motor are really expensive, I would think hard before buying.  Treadmills are a PIA to move.

Ryland

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2017, 11:19:21 AM »
Awesome! You should use this epic tool called IFTTT, which will shoot every "Treadmill" Craigslist post to your email/phone right as they hit Craigslist.

Wrote a how-to on exactly this a few months back. Might be worth a look: http://www.thehiddengreen.com/blog/score-online-deals

Full Beard

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2017, 01:44:01 PM »
Treadmills usually draw more amps than a normal circuit can handle.  Make sure you have a dedicated circuit that can handle that increased amp draw.  I bought a really nice brand new treadmill years ago and every time I used it it would pop the circuit for my fridge.  It got pretty annoying and I didn't use the treadmill much because of that.

I just wanted to give you a heads up before you go spend the money and have the treadmill delivered.

Midwest

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Re: treadmill advice
« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2017, 02:32:09 PM »
Treadmills usually draw more amps than a normal circuit can handle.  Make sure you have a dedicated circuit that can handle that increased amp draw.  I bought a really nice brand new treadmill years ago and every time I used it it would pop the circuit for my fridge.  It got pretty annoying and I didn't use the treadmill much because of that.

I just wanted to give you a heads up before you go spend the money and have the treadmill delivered.

I appreciate the advice.  I guess I'm feeling a little fatalistic about it.  If it works great, then great.  If it doesn't, I don't think it would be too difficult to resell it.  But yeah, I'll put it through the paces as you suggested.

The cheap ones go 10.  The more expensive go 12 MPH in my experience.  At least it's a cheap experiment.