Author Topic: Training for a Marathon  (Read 5985 times)

Trying to get this right

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Training for a Marathon
« on: September 12, 2016, 02:19:30 AM »
Hi Mustachians!

I am training for my first marathon and I'm learning very quickly that this endeavor can be expensive!  It is my 30th birthday gift to myself so I'm giving myself a bit of leeway in doing this RIGHT and not injuring myself.  However, costs are very quickly adding up- new shoes (old ones didn't fit properly), a new bladder for my camelback ($25), practice race costs ($35 x 2- one 25k and one 30k), the marathon itself ($175).  I can see where this could get a bit out of hand...

Any tips and tricks in conquering this goal?  Any suggestions in doing this in a cost efficient way? 

Thank you SO very much for your suggestions!  I'm really excited and I hope this is the start to a much healthier lifestyle.  :D

With gratitude always,
Kabocha

plog

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2016, 07:47:07 AM »
Quote
Any suggestions in doing this in a cost efficient way? 

Quit thinking you need to spend money to run a marathon.  Ran one in 2009, so adjust for inflation:

$40 for a pair of shoes
$5 for synthetic underwear
$20 for GU
$5 for carryable water bottle
$50 for entry to marathon

$175 for a marathon is outrageous.  That's the cost of a last minute entry to a big production like the Rock 'n Roll marathons.  You're running a marathon, its going to be miserable, spending more money is not going to make it more enjoyable or more memorable.

Also, you don't need practice races.  Streets are free, run 25k to 30k whenever you want.    I also question the camelback--weight matters, one gallon of water is 8.5 lbs.  Look into a carryable bottle, I got mine for $5, holds 32 ounces, 2 lbs.

Now, if this is just to juice your facebook or instagram, you can do this for free, just pick a marathon, print off a bib from last year's race,  douse yourself with some water, jump on the course at mile 26 and have someone get your picture taken right as you cross the finish line.

MsPeacock

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2016, 08:27:07 AM »
Are you doing the Honolulu marathon? It is quite expensive, but quite an event too.

You can probably forego the two preparation races and just do training runs on your own. As for shoes, I consider them absolutely essential. I have significant joint problems due to medical conditions and good shoes have made the difference between being able to run and unable to run - so I am not an advocate  of cutting corners there.

Are you following a training plan? Do you have a running group you practice with? You may be able to borrow a hydration belt from others.

For other gear see what you can find at the thrift stores. I have found some good running shorts at the stores.

Assuming you are male thank your lucky stars that you don't need to invest in a good jog bra at $60+ a pop.

Another way to look at it is that the shoes, camelback bladder, entry fee, etc. are entertainment costs spread over many months of training and prep. If you spend $500 over 6 months you are in for less than $100 a month for this activity. 

Rufus.T.Firefly

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2016, 08:31:38 AM »
You're right, running races is not inexpensive, but if you're enjoy the training aspect then the cost per hour of enjoyment is very low. My wife ran a marathon a couple of years ago. She went through three pairs of shoes including the original ones. So I would expect to buy one more pair - if you've found inexpensive shoes you love, go ahead and buy the second pair now.

Also, race entries should be about $50-80. $175 is cray-cray.

Speaking as a non-marathoner, but an observer of those running the race, I'll second Plog's comment: Camelback is a bad idea - too much weight. There is better equipment for hydration. Also, during the race there are plenty of stops. When you're training and reach the ~20 mile distances and need more fluid than you can carry, see if you can find someone who will bike alongside of you. I did this for my wife when she ran her longest training run (~23 mi).

Trudie

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2016, 09:04:21 AM »
Been there done that.  Shoes are paramount so don't get cheap there.  I just found it to be an expensive endeavor (travel costs, etcetera) all the way around.  Still, am glad I did it.  Marathons are self-limiting anyway.  It's not like you'll be doing one a month, or even one a year (for most of us).

This MMM thing is also a marathon, not a sprint.  If it makes you happy to do this, don't worry so much about the money.

I may have found that one marathon is enough for me (see self-limiting comment above) because my 45 year old body may not hold up.  Still, the knowledge that I did that thing I didn't think I could do was worth the blood, sweat and (yes!) money. 

honeybbq

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2016, 09:15:47 AM »
I'm no help - I signed up for a marathon for my 40th. :)

I think your costs are reasonable. I also consider it an investment in my health and happiness. Runner's world published an article (I think it was this month) that said runners save $2500/year on health care costs by being healthy, lowering their risk of heart disease, depression etc.

Just don't give in to fancy gimmicks, take care of your feet and spend money on quality shoes, and stick to your training plan and you'll be fine.

In terms of costliness, running is rather cheap compared to having a boat, golfing, skiing. It's about balance. If running makes you happy, do it.

des999

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2016, 09:33:25 AM »
It is cheaper if u sign up immediately after the prior years race. Every month the price goes up. I agree with others don't skimp on shoes.

I only do half marathons but would like to do a full some day. Running cost money but not much compared to other activities. No way I'd spend money on practice races. Just download a free app and do it yourself. It's more of a time commitment for me then a money one.

Good luck

Proud Foot

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2016, 09:57:42 AM »
Do you have one in mind and how long is it until the race?

As for costs: Shoes - you don't want to be stingy here. Find ones that fit you well and make sure they are broken in before the race but are not too worn out.
Camelback - I hope this is just for training.  All marathons will have water stations so you will be fine with just those.
Practice races - I don't know why you would need to pay for a practice race.  Just go out and run those distances.
Marathon cost - All depends on which marathon you are doing and how far out you sign up. 

For a successful marathon you need to be smart about the clothes you wear that they don't rub/chafe.  Also, you didn't mention your prior running experience so be cautious and work your mileage up at a reasonable rate so you don't get injured.

Good luck!

bognish

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #8 on: September 12, 2016, 04:21:58 PM »
Kind of depends on how rural your running routes are, but for long run I just stash water in old bottles the night before. Its not too hard to find a telephone pole or bush or something on the side of the road to hide a water bottle behind every few miles. Just go back and pick them up after. If you are worried about them being found you could leave a note or tape around the cap so you can tell if its been opened. I never thought about carrying it.

Trying to get this right

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #9 on: September 12, 2016, 04:47:00 PM »
Hello! 
Yes, it is the Honolulu Marathon.  And I'm a chick but I do have some good sports bras and running shorts that I'm already using.

I'm following a local running program.  I love it!  It keeps me coming back and I love the enthusiasm and encouragement in addition to the camraderie.

The camelback is for training.  I'm very fair and even practicing in the early morning with sunscreen, I still feel really fatigued by the sun.  The extra cold water helps immensely.  I use light colored tops, a hat and sunscreen.  Not sure what else I can use to beat the hot sun out here in Honolulu.  Totally open to suggestions though! 

I ran crosscountry in high school and have run on and off since then.  Since I had a couple injuries lately, I'm walking the entire course rather than jogging or running it.  I should be able to do it in 6 hours.

As much as I love seeing friends post on Facebook or Instagram, I'm not one to post on either.  I'm really doing this to encourage heathy habits, self care and accomplishing a big goal.  😊

Any snack suggestions for eating during or after?  I'm super famished after our long practices.

Thanks for all the replies!  I really appreciate it.  Please continue to relay any wisdom! 


Trying to get this right

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #10 on: September 12, 2016, 04:48:06 PM »
P.S. The race is December 11th! 

AlanStache

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #11 on: September 12, 2016, 04:54:32 PM »
Heat is a bitch, respect it, else you get really f-ed up.

This December, ie two months away?

Romag

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #12 on: September 12, 2016, 05:03:02 PM »
I'm running Honolulu too. It will be my 15th marathon.
There are some costs, of course, but (excluding travel...) it is a pretty inexpensive hobby, especially when weighed against the fitness and health aspect - plus you get a lot of time and miles on a good pair of shoes.
I think running a half-marathon or another medium distance race during training is a good idea.

Good luck! Train hard!!

Trying to get this right

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #13 on: September 12, 2016, 05:32:21 PM »
Thank you!

Yup, this December!  I'm hoping it will be cooler but it has been so humid lately.  Good training, I suppose.


MsPeacock

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #14 on: September 12, 2016, 06:42:34 PM »
I am doing my first triathalon next week so I not an expert in this my any means. . I would suggest experimenting with various feuling/feeding strategies starting now. Many people use a combination of water, coke or some sugary soda, Gatorade, energy gels, fruit chews (like welches), etc. I like candy corn personally because it doesn't upset my stomach, tastes good, is cheap, and is made with sugar (Brach's). There is quite a lot of information online about how much and what and how many calories and etc.

I lived in Honolulu for 4 years, many years ago. The sun can be brutal if you are fair skinned. Now I live on the mainland and have been training in 90+ temps all summer. Attend to your hydration is my best advice. If you start to overheat get cool water in your body - dump it over your head and down your back. Training in the heat helps with the adjustment.

Not sure what joint problems you are working with, but I have found the Hoku One Ones to be miracle shoes for me. Crazy expensive and I didn't like them at first - but I am back to running without pain for the first time in 20 years.
« Last Edit: September 12, 2016, 08:45:53 PM by MsPeacock »

MrsDinero

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #15 on: September 12, 2016, 06:54:10 PM »
I've never done a full but I've done about 15 half marathons. 

I agree with others who say don't skimp on the shoes.  You need good shoes.

You don't need those training races but they can be good motivators.  I also recommend finding a group to run with.   The group I used to run with had a mix of experienced and beginning runners.  It was great to run with all levels and paces.

I also cannot recommend a foam roller enough.  I use mine after every run (before pregnancy) and loved it. 

I put races in the experience category.  I will spend money on races but I work it in my annual budget.  The most expensive races I've participated in are those 200 mile overnight relay races.  I'm planning yo run one next year with some friends.

brooklynmoney

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2016, 08:56:18 PM »
Those costs seem pretty minimal and the entry fee is not that bad. I pay like close to $100 for the big halfs near me, but of course my local races are some of the most sought after and largest in the
US if not globally which can be both a blessing and an annoyance.

Happy in CA

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #17 on: September 13, 2016, 03:38:01 PM »
I have run more than 20 marathons and my next one will be the week before yours.  Entry fees have really gone up and the destination races (like Honolulu) tend to be the most expensive.  Boston, for example is $185, not to mention that you have to run crazy fast to get in.  Practice races are not essential, but they are fun and get you used to the race environment - aid stations, etc., so if you want to sign up for some practice races, pick the ones that fit best into your training plan and go for it.  Running marathons has actually changed my life for the better in just about every conceivable way.  Friends, check.  Health, check.  Appreciation of nature and the environment, check.  Despite the expense, it is much less expensive than a lot of other sports.  Golf, triathlon and mountaineering come to mind.

After long runs I like to go out for breakfast, so that adds additional cost.  Of course you can make omelets at home, too.  The main thing is to eat enough, and get enough sleep, so that you're ready for the next training run.  Especially with the first marathon, take it easy.  After my first I thought I had ruined my knees.  As it turned out they just needed a couple of months to recover.  Have a great marathon experience!

honeybbq

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #18 on: September 13, 2016, 04:44:44 PM »
I am doing my first triathalon next week so I not an expert in this my any means.

Good luck!

Signed

Another triathlete :)

honeybbq

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #19 on: September 13, 2016, 04:46:55 PM »
In terms of fueling, I would find out what is going to be served/available on the course and practice with that during your training runs to make sure your stomach can tolerate it. During the run you're going to want quickly digesting carbs - are you planning on doing GUs and such? Whatever you decide to use, you should train with it.

Prefuel with something carby and protein - toast or bagel with almond butter, etc.

Afterwards, fuel with the same, a mix of carbs an protein. Apple and peanut butter, sandwich, etc.

Fearthebait

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #20 on: September 14, 2016, 06:03:37 AM »
To save money on a big marathon like honolulu, you can volunteer at another event run by the same company. They usually comp you with free entry or severely discounted races. I do this every time for Spartan Races and Tough Mudders especially. The only race I have ever had to pay for was the Chicago Half Marathon.

RosieTR

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2016, 08:38:55 AM »
I agree the fee and shoes are not the things to stress about. I'm sure we paid >$100 each for a not big name marathon a couple years ago. That's the going rate here-I'm not sure I could find a 10K for less than $50 much less a marathon! There are reasons to pick certain races, and enjoying a well-run marathon for your birthday may be better than struggling through a poorly run marathon that's cheaper.
For food, I needed more salty snacks and did goldfish crackers and sport drink (Cytomax but whatever you find that works is good). I also dilute the sport drink more than recommended because they all get sicky sweet as I get hot. I really wanted my own water and camelbacks allow a lot easier drinking than trying to gulp from a cup at aid stations.
For heat...loose, wet cotton cools best but it can chafe. A frequently dampened long sleeved poly shirt might work. I'd expect Honolulu has a decent selection of athletic gear at thrift stores so you can try different options on your training runs. Keep in mind, what works for 1 hr may suck at 5 hrs, so any weird bunching or hot spots should be addressed immediately.

Have fun!

MsPeacock

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2016, 03:41:58 PM »
I am doing my first triathalon next week so I not an expert in this my any means.

Good luck!

Signed

Another triathlete :)

Thank you! I've loved the training and hope to do maybe 3 next year (sprints).

Bicycle_B

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #23 on: September 14, 2016, 05:44:57 PM »
Have run marathons before.

+1 to all comments valuing shoes.  To cut the cost, research your local running stores, learn their sales or other savings programs.  With planning, you can get a discount on your inevitable next pair of shoes even if it's too late for this training season.  (Do the stores give discounts for turning in old shoes to recycle?  By using coupons?  By having clearance sales or 2 for 1 discounts when the manufacturers bring out new models of their shoes?)  If you're going to keep running, you lose nothing by purchasing a new pair when they're cheap.  You can even break them in gradually and preserve your old pair by alternating workouts.  Also, if you are getting a discount by using an "x % off" sale, buy your Gu at the same time to maximize the discount.

+1 to signing up early for your race(s).  Early is always cheaper, later is always more expensive.

To maximize the ability to finish on marathon day, I strongly support running a couple of practice races, exactly as you are planning.  The experience you get ensures your success on the big day, so in a sense the small investment in race fees for the shorter races is protecting the bigger financial expense of the marathon itself.  It's still a matter of paying for an experience, but I think it's well worth it.  I love being part of a running club sometimes, participating in races, etc so agree with posters who feel these can be experiences worth the money. 

Fwiw, check also into the cost of running clubs and such.  Obviously if you prefer the solitary nature of a training run, this may not be what you want, but it's amazing how uplifting a supportive group of fellow runners can be.  You get a whole new set of friends in the same time you're already putting into your training program.  The financial aspect here is that some running groups are expensive for-profit activities while others are dirt-cheap nonprofit clubs.  If your city has a good cheap running club (free to $60/year range, for example) you might even come out ahead financially through training tips, referrals to shoe discounts, and so on.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2016, 05:47:02 PM by Bicycle_B »

Crazycarl

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #24 on: September 15, 2016, 09:39:32 AM »
Go with a water belt that can hold a couple water bottles rather than a camel pack. The camel pack on the back with make you hotter and not as efficient in cooling down. With the water belt, you can have each bottle hold something different such as water and sports drink. Correct fitting shoes are essential. Pre races are not.
If your run is on a Saturday, make all your long run days are on Saturday to keep your body in a rhythm. You should be slowly increasing the time you run and not focus on the length of run, but just keeping at a slightly uncomfortable pace to push yourself. Once you can run 18+ miles you can run a marathon. It is all mental after than point. Good luck!

Bicycle_B

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #25 on: September 15, 2016, 02:23:10 PM »
Go with a water belt that can hold a couple water bottles rather than a camel pack. The camel pack on the back with make you hotter and not as efficient in cooling down. With the water belt, you can have each bottle hold something different such as water and sports drink. Correct fitting shoes are essential. Pre races are not.
If your run is on a Saturday, make all your long run days are on Saturday to keep your body in a rhythm. You should be slowly increasing the time you run and not focus on the length of run, but just keeping at a slightly uncomfortable pace to push yourself. Once you can run 18+ miles you can run a marathon. It is all mental after than point. Good luck!

Forgive me for getting off topic here if OP's topic is advice re the financial aspects of marathoning.

In my observation, if your long run is 18 miles, you're likely to hit "the wall" by 20 miles and have a very long struggle period at race's end.  The mental challenge is indeed difficult in this case.  (Not sure this will happen with OP's all-walking plan or not.)  Instead, it is perfectly possible to train up to 24-25 miles in practice and probably eliminate the "wall" experience.  One rule of thumb suggests you hit a "wall" any time you run more than 10% longer than the previous longest run, so whether you hit a "wall" depends on how far and how gradually you build up your training mileage. Your race day experience will likely be a direct result of your training level.  This is similar to the injury-prevention rule of thumb to only increase your training runs by 10%/week at most. Anyway, YMMV (so to speak). 

Also here's an injury prevention link that refers to the 10% (this article suggest 3%.   But hey, time constraints.  You decide how much training time vs race day risk you want):

http://www.runnersworld.com/health/the-10-laws-of-injury-prevention

« Last Edit: September 15, 2016, 02:28:48 PM by Bicycle_B »

slugline

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #26 on: September 15, 2016, 03:00:11 PM »
Lots of good advice already. Just wanted to chime in to say. . . .

Since I had a couple injuries lately, I'm walking the entire course rather than jogging or running it.  I should be able to do it in 6 hours.

. . . you have one hell of a walking pace! Good luck!

DavidinNOLA

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #27 on: September 15, 2016, 03:41:41 PM »
I've been running marathons and ultramarathons for 10 years and have seen the whole range that people are willing to pay.  My experience is that running can be as cheap or expensive as you allow it be.  Here are a few tips that have worked for me...

1) Look for cheap races.  Do a google search for "Fat Ass Race."  "Fat Asses" are the anti-race, so to speak, or maybe a glorified group run.  There won't be any bands or cow bells or fancy medals, but the race will probably be free.  Smaller races tend to be cheaper. My first marathon was the Chicago Marathon, which 10 years ago cost all 30,000 participants about $150 each.  Last month I ran a 50K trail race in south Louisiana that cost the 50 participants $25 each. Both were great experiences, but one seems a little more Mustachian than the other.

2) If your feet are done growing, ask the running store about cutting you a deal.  I've been able to score nice discounts by purchasing 2 or 3 pairs of shoes at a time.  Similarly, ask the running store if they're willing to sell any of last season's stuff at a discount.

3) Try first to manage without some fancy equipment before deciding to buy it.  I would bet that most people can run further than they think they can without water, making a camelbak unnecessary.  Knowing where your local water fountains are also helps.

4) Offer to volunteer at a race.  Race Directors at small races often need help and are willing to wave some or all of the fee for a future race if you can help out. This probably won't work for something like Honolulu or the Rock n' Roll marathons, but it works in the smaller race community.  It's also a nice way to meet people who are involved in the smaller race community.

5) Consider running a race as a "bandit" -- that is, without paying for it.  (This one might be considered unethical, and I wouldn't do it myself, but in the spirit of open inquiry I thought I'd just throw it out there leave it's ethical standing up to the reader.)

Civex

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #28 on: September 15, 2016, 06:32:01 PM »
Go with a water belt that can hold a couple water bottles rather than a camel pack. The camel pack on the back with make you hotter and not as efficient in cooling down. With the water belt, you can have each bottle hold something different such as water and sports drink. Correct fitting shoes are essential. Pre races are not.
If your run is on a Saturday, make all your long run days are on Saturday to keep your body in a rhythm. You should be slowly increasing the time you run and not focus on the length of run, but just keeping at a slightly uncomfortable pace to push yourself. Once you can run 18+ miles you can run a marathon. It is all mental after than point. Good luck!

Forgive me for getting off topic here if OP's topic is advice re the financial aspects of marathoning.

In my observation, if your long run is 18 miles, you're likely to hit "the wall" by 20 miles and have a very long struggle period at race's end. The mental challenge is indeed difficult in this case.  (Not sure this will happen with OP's all-walking plan or not.)  Instead, it is perfectly possible to train up to 24-25 miles in practice and probably eliminate the "wall" experience.  One rule of thumb suggests you hit a "wall" any time you run more than 10% longer than the previous longest run, so whether you hit a "wall" depends on how far and how gradually you build up your training mileage. Your race day experience will likely be a direct result of your training level.  This is similar to the injury-prevention rule of thumb to only increase your training runs by 10%/week at most. Anyway, YMMV (so to speak). 

Also here's an injury prevention link that refers to the 10% (this article suggest 3%.   But hey, time constraints.  You decide how much training time vs race day risk you want):

http://www.runnersworld.com/health/the-10-laws-of-injury-prevention

Hanson's marathon method recommends a 16 mile max run and has a strong following. I've personally followed their plans pretty closely and have run all 3 of my marathons right around 3:30- I've only done 2 training runs longer than 16 miles ever. And I'm not coming from a huge base (never was an athlete.) I'm not disagreeing that with the right base/plan that 20+ mile runs aren't beneficial, but that stating without them you will bonk, isn't right.

For the OP, you mention that you are very sun/heat sensitive- I would recommend doing some longer training runs/walks with the exact gear you plan on completing the marathon in, just to troubleshoot. Body glide, good sunscreen, light gear, and hats are you friend :)

Good luck, and try not to stress about the costs-yours seem pretty reasonable. Aside from the health benefits, look at the cost per hour for running vs other leisure activities; running is usually much less expensive.

Bicycle_B

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #29 on: September 15, 2016, 06:47:47 PM »
Go with a water belt that can hold a couple water bottles rather than a camel pack. The camel pack on the back with make you hotter and not as efficient in cooling down. With the water belt, you can have each bottle hold something different such as water and sports drink. Correct fitting shoes are essential. Pre races are not.
If your run is on a Saturday, make all your long run days are on Saturday to keep your body in a rhythm. You should be slowly increasing the time you run and not focus on the length of run, but just keeping at a slightly uncomfortable pace to push yourself. Once you can run 18+ miles you can run a marathon. It is all mental after than point. Good luck!

Forgive me for getting off topic here if OP's topic is advice re the financial aspects of marathoning.

In my observation, if your long run is 18 miles, you're likely to hit "the wall" by 20 miles and have a very long struggle period at race's end. The mental challenge is indeed difficult in this case.  (Not sure this will happen with OP's all-walking plan or not.)  Instead, it is perfectly possible to train up to 24-25 miles in practice and probably eliminate the "wall" experience.  One rule of thumb suggests you hit a "wall" any time you run more than 10% longer than the previous longest run, so whether you hit a "wall" depends on how far and how gradually you build up your training mileage. Your race day experience will likely be a direct result of your training level.  This is similar to the injury-prevention rule of thumb to only increase your training runs by 10%/week at most. Anyway, YMMV (so to speak). 

Also here's an injury prevention link that refers to the 10% (this article suggest 3%.   But hey, time constraints.  You decide how much training time vs race day risk you want):

http://www.runnersworld.com/health/the-10-laws-of-injury-prevention

Hanson's marathon method recommends a 16 mile max run and has a strong following. I've personally followed their plans pretty closely and have run all 3 of my marathons right around 3:30- I've only done 2 training runs longer than 16 miles ever. And I'm not coming from a huge base (never was an athlete.) I'm not disagreeing that with the right base/plan that 20+ mile runs aren't beneficial, but that stating without them you will bonk, isn't right.

For the OP, you mention that you are very sun/heat sensitive- I would recommend doing some longer training runs/walks with the exact gear you plan on completing the marathon in, just to troubleshoot. Body glide, good sunscreen, light gear, and hats are you friend :)

Good luck, and try not to stress about the costs-yours seem pretty reasonable. Aside from the health benefits, look at the cost per hour for running vs other leisure activities; running is usually much less expensive.

Ok, fair enough. 

Primm

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #30 on: September 15, 2016, 07:47:06 PM »
I am doing my first triathalon next week so I not an expert in this my any means.

Good luck!

Signed

Another triathlete :)

Me too!

ruraljuror

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #31 on: September 17, 2016, 09:22:43 PM »
I think your costs are reasonable and some will not recur often. I like to get fitted for shoes at a running shoe store, buy one pair from them and then search online for the same make/model for less. If you find a good deal, buy multiple pairs b/c you'll wear them eventually. I've stuck with the same series of shoes since 2007.

I think the Camelback is a great idea if you're hiking the race and will be out there for 6 hours. But, be sure you're getting plenty of salt/electrolytes and not drinking too much water. Shot Bloks and Gu is the way to go for races, but definitely need to practice with them on your long training run/walks.

Hotstreak

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #32 on: September 17, 2016, 10:42:30 PM »
I think your costs are reasonable and some will not recur often. I like to get fitted for shoes at a running shoe store, buy one pair from them and then search online for the same make/model for less. If you find a good deal, buy multiple pairs b/c you'll wear them eventually. I've stuck with the same series of shoes since 2007.

I think the Camelback is a great idea if you're hiking the race and will be out there for 6 hours. But, be sure you're getting plenty of salt/electrolytes and not drinking too much water. Shot Bloks and Gu is the way to go for races, but definitely need to practice with them on your long training run/walks.


You can mix salts and sugars in to water yourself, and save money on expensive supplements.


I don't run marathons but I've been an athlete for a long time, and a big rule of successful competition is that you don't change your routine on race day.  If you all the sudden switch to expensive gu it will effect your body in new ways - best to use something cheap and effective for training, and continue using it during your race.

chasesfish

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Re: Training for a Marathon
« Reply #33 on: September 18, 2016, 08:30:25 AM »
I'm going to agree with the others, running is a fairly inexpensive hobby when you look at the time, fitness benefits, and personal discipline.

I just finished a $55 smaller race yesterday, I think I walked away with $40 of gear and sports bars that were being given away by the vendors.  Not a bad net cost