Author Topic: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question  (Read 3003 times)

~Ari~

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The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« on: April 21, 2016, 02:18:28 PM »
I realize this question has been asked a billion times, but I truly would like some mustachian help on this.

I have been at my current job for almost two years as an office assistant part time (25-30 hrs a week - $12.00 hr). I got the job right after I graduated Tech school and moved to a different town - I am 23 if that helps at all. I just recently accepted a different position with the same small business company and have become their Communications and Marketing Coordinator working full time (40-45hr a week). I have an associates of arts degree in liberal education, but that is all. I did not go to school for any communications, marketing, advertising, etc. But, the company I work for has been great, and they wanted me to fill the position as they like me working for them. My coworkers are all in their upper 30s or older, and they wanted a younger mind like mine to do the advertising and technology side of things. There was talk of me getting a raise (never said how much) a while back ago once I started the position, but that was it - it didn't go any further than that. Now that I have filled the position, I was hoping that I would get the raise, but nothing has happened.

I do feel like a fish out of water with my new work load, but I am learning quickly and like it a lot. I definitely know I shouldn't expect to get paid as much as someone who has a degree in the field or that has more experience, but would still like some advice on how to go about asking them for it and how much of a raise is appropriate?

I appreciate any input. Thank you

coolistdude

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #1 on: April 21, 2016, 02:30:41 PM »
Was the talk of a raise in writing? Do you have an awesome relationship with your manager? I'm assuming that is who the talk was with.

~Ari~

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #2 on: April 21, 2016, 02:32:48 PM »
Was the talk of a raise in writing? Do you have an awesome relationship with your manager? I'm assuming that is who the talk was with.

It was with my boss - who is also the owner of the company, and the office manager. It was talk though, so it was not in writing.

Fred2004

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #3 on: April 21, 2016, 02:34:38 PM »
Instead of the raise, do they offer education assistance?

if you think that could help you in the long run depending on your position, it would be more valuable than asking for X% raise.

When I was working full-time and having my MBA paid for I saw that as income (~10k a year for school)

Educational assistance depends on your company and your role (they wouldn't have paid for me to get an art degree :P)  It is usually predicated on how long you've been with the company (at least a year usually) and also you would need to work for them for a year or 2 after usually (the easy loophole is to find a job that will eat the cost if you want to leave, which I did).

Free school is good...having a BS in communications/mkting would only help you out! (and undergrad isn't that expensive)

~Ari~

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2016, 02:35:10 PM »
and I have a pretty good relationship with them both. They just never seem to be both at work at the same time I am, which makes it tricky to try and sit down and chat with them.

~Ari~

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2016, 02:41:58 PM »
Instead of the raise, do they offer education assistance?

if you think that could help you in the long run depending on your position, it would be more valuable than asking for X% raise.

When I was working full-time and having my MBA paid for I saw that as income (~10k a year for school)

Educational assistance depends on your company and your role (they wouldn't have paid for me to get an art degree :P)  It is usually predicated on how long you've been with the company (at least a year usually) and also you would need to work for them for a year or 2 after usually (the easy loophole is to find a job that will eat the cost if you want to leave, which I did).

Free school is good...having a BS in communications/mkting would only help you out! (and undergrad isn't that expensive)


Thanks for the help! I have thought about this. It may be a possibility. It is hard for me to know if this is something that I would really like to commit too though. I do not plan on being at the position forever, as my husband and I plan to move back to our hometown within the next 2-3 years. I have not told them this. We also live in a rural area, so I am not sure what my options are as far as colleges and/or online classes offered around here. I will have to look into that more.

Fishindude

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2016, 02:42:24 PM »
Call a meeting with your boss and simply let him know that you would like to get some more money, and make sure there is an agreement as to when he can let you know what he can do for you, if the decision needs approval from someone up the ladder.
Don't know what others are being paid at this business, but you are being grossly underpaid, for someone with responsibility and technical training.  $12 / hr Is not a livable wage, a minimum of $18 / hr plus insurance and benefits is more like it.   If this is a cheapskate company that just doesn't pay much more than that, keep working but start looking for other work.

AZDude

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2016, 02:44:09 PM »
Quote
I do feel like a fish out of water with my new work load, but I am learning quickly and like it a lot. I definitely know I shouldn't expect to get paid as much as someone who has a degree in the field or that has more experience, but would still like some advice on how to go about asking them for it and how much of a raise is appropriate?

First thing is to change your mindset. You do not want to have the "I'm entitled to X" type of attitude, but being confident in your abilities and expecting to get paid market rate for the work you are doing is important for your future.

Once you feel like you have a good handle on your new responsibilities, then schedule a meeting with your direct supervisor, and have a plan about what you think your work is worth and be prepared to explain why.

CNM

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2016, 02:49:43 PM »
This is what I would do.  Look around online or with friends to see what the average wage for people who do your work is.  Then meet with one of your bosses (if both aren't available at the same time) and explain your situation: you're now FT, expanded responsibilities in XYZ, and so on.  Then ask for the upper end of the wage range.  They may give you it or counteroffer.  Then you can accept or negotiate a bit more.  Many people feel weird about asking for money but it is all part of the business world.

Fred2004

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2016, 03:38:31 PM »
I'm assuming the full-time position already came w/ a bump above $12...if it didn't that is crazy.

usually promotions = 20% raise...but going from part-time to full-time is completely different, so you should probably be making 30-35k as a min base salary

Justified by
A) they know you (been there 2 yrs)
B) you are doing the job (despite only AA)

**usually time worked can be substituted for a degree...like a BS no experience, or 2 yrs experience no degree (usually they want more yrs experience if not degreed for some reason)

~Ari~

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2016, 03:41:47 PM »
I'm assuming the full-time position already came w/ a bump above $12...if it didn't that is crazy.

usually promotions = 20% raise...but going from part-time to full-time is completely different, so you should probably be making 30-35k as a min base salary

Justified by
A) they know you (been there 2 yrs)
B) you are doing the job (despite only AA)

Still making $12 - which is crazy and why I am wanting to ask for the raise. I just have never been in this situation before and didn't know how to go about it or what to expect. Thanks for you help

Fred2004

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2016, 03:45:49 PM »
saber rattling is always fun!!!

Especially if you can just get a job doing something else for more $ (not sure since you are in a rural area)

If you don't ask for it, they will never bring it up.  It is best to not be cocky, but to come from a position of humility, that is fact based like other person said...

more responsibilities, blah blah blah

I can't imagine a communications/marketing person making less than $20hr full-time though.  I do corporate finance though.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2016, 03:47:34 PM by Fred2004 »

MrMoogle

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Re: The good 'ol "Asking for a Raise" question
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2016, 04:07:51 PM »
As you're still learning, you can use that in the conversation.  What measurable things do you need to accomplish, and what wage will you get when you accomplish that.  You can certainly bring up things you've already accomplished.  Started at X, now I'm at Y, moving to Z. 

Also if they bring up your lack of a bachelors, throw it back at them to see what someone with a bachelors would be doing differently.  My mom has an associates in nursing, now she runs a floor at a hospital, where the last 3 of her advancements have all "required" someone with a bachelors.  She basically took over the job in the interim while they tried to find someone, and as she was already doing it, they did a "mumble mumble bachelors, mumble mumble, you have the job."  The fact that you are doing it gives you a legs up. 

Good luck.