Author Topic: Salary to Hours Worked Ratio and FIRE  (Read 2380 times)

MrsCoolCat

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 420
  • Age: 2015
Salary to Hours Worked Ratio and FIRE
« on: March 08, 2015, 07:12:01 PM »
Hi everyone. First off, I don't want to sound ungrateful, entitled, etc. but I have a very firm grasp of what I want. I understand that most people here work their hardest which includes a lot of OT hours to get the bigger raises and biggest bucks, etc. so that they can achieve FI quicker. I get that, but I just don't feel like I'm in a place, position, company where IF I were to work my ass off and put in the OT that the amount of compensation would be worthwhile to me, and "improve my overall quality of life". Does this make sense? Maybe I am jumping the gun and over analyzing.

I understand many people here are highly educated, maybe some older (so more experience), etc. so for them to work more and get these more than 3% raises it is worthwhile... but honestly for me I do not. I currently make $47k and 3% is $1,410. I know anything is better than nothing but for those of you that don't know I work for a so-called "dynamic" family owned company where the people in supervisor positions actually do less than those below them and just work dump. IMO just not worth the extra time, expectation and stress for the price tag. I value my time and can cut back in other ways if I HAD to. The below is just additional blah blah ranting.

I have never worked for a company where the supervisor was not expected to do his/her work, help others and therefore often times this meant being the first to arrive and the last to leave. That's what I feel it should be which was also why I personally never sought that opportunity. Well, mind F*CKED is me that my company is backwards and my nutcase boss wants me to stay as long as I need to do stupid shit like print, hole punch and tediously label a binder that she'll never read... she gets paid (nearly) twice my salary and quite frankly she should do it because I'm not enabling her.

Anyways, it's just the work culture and the department but really, if she had 1/2 or 1 additional employee (it's just us) it would alleviate (though not solve) some of these issues... I actually work during my entire 7.5 hour shift. I don't small talk, take breaks, etc. so that I can do my work (and I can) in the 7.5 hours allotted to me. She's just really pushing it and trying to take advantage as if I'm her savior. No, you are a supervisor, please lie in your position and stop expecting me to print out every document you receive by email when you sit next to a working printer. At this rate I will continue to push back until... the unforeseeable... who knows.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2015, 07:15:46 PM by MrsCoolCat »

TN_Steve

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 257
  • Age: 59
  • Location: fly-over country
Re: Salary to Hours Worked Ratio and FIRE
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2015, 07:33:27 AM »
Sounds like time to look seriously for another job.

Generally, there does come a point where it may not be worth it to bust your butt any more.   DW, for instance, won't take the side gig of moonlighting shifts that have large gross pay associated with them; marginal tax rates and already spending too few nights at home outweigh the incremental gain.

Your situation, however, strikes me as something else entirely.

mak1277

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 756
Re: Salary to Hours Worked Ratio and FIRE
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2015, 08:05:34 AM »
Most everywhere I've worked had a culture with three classes (I'm generalizing, but it's fairly close to accurate):

Management
People that wanted to be management
People who were happy where they were and didn't care to be management

The third group of people left the office first every day, as soon as their shift was over.  The second group of people, on the other hand, would almost always wait until management left, and then they would go.  I've never worked in a place where management was the last to leave.

If you want to move up (if that's a realistic opportunity), then you *should* be asking your boss to take work off of her plate.  If you don't care, then you should be comfortable leaving when your normal day is over.

MrsCoolCat

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 420
  • Age: 2015
Re: Salary to Hours Worked Ratio and FIRE
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2015, 11:20:28 AM »
My boss is an idiot to say the least. She clearly only wants to alleviate herself from being overwhelmed which I get, but at the same time u make nearly twice my salary. I know this is very typical of corporate but she's really pushing it in the expectation dept rather than doing it herself or figuring out a way to get upper management to get her more help. She's so inefficient she needs it.

I'm no Savior, don't plan to be & surely don't get paid enough to do 1/4 to 1/3 of her brain dead work of printing, filing & organizing her crap. Once again it's our company corporate culture. The other day i realized the owner, who's a billionaire mind u, may run things differently but ur nobody. Don't expect me to print all ur files like ur the owner of this gig. Ur not. Pssh sorry but that's how I feel. The most professional company I've worked for always had managers & even the VP himself (the son of the owner of the company) came in first and left last. I respect that. I do not respect this fool.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2015, 11:24:03 AM by MrsCoolCat »

sirdoug007

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 587
  • Age: 38
  • Location: Houston, TX
Re: Salary to Hours Worked Ratio and FIRE
« Reply #4 on: March 09, 2015, 11:30:50 AM »
Most everywhere I've worked had a culture with three classes (I'm generalizing, but it's fairly close to accurate):

Management
People that wanted to be management
People who were happy where they were and didn't care to be management

The third group of people left the office first every day, as soon as their shift was over.  The second group of people, on the other hand, would almost always wait until management left, and then they would go.  I've never worked in a place where management was the last to leave.

If you want to move up (if that's a realistic opportunity), then you *should* be asking your boss to take work off of her plate.  If you don't care, then you should be comfortable leaving when your normal day is over.

This is very nicely described by the Gervais Principle (warning, this is basically a book): http://www.ribbonfarm.com/2009/10/07/the-gervais-principle-or-the-office-according-to-the-office/

This is the basic hierarchy:


The "losers" (economic losers, not worthless individuals) is basically the most rational of all the levels.