Author Topic: Retiring abroad  (Read 13869 times)

EconDiva

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1130
Retiring abroad
« on: May 10, 2014, 08:52:24 AM »
I have been thinking a lot about this lately. I'm considering it because I feel like retiring to a less expensive country will allow me to retire sooner.

Any US citizens here retire to another country? If so, where? Why did you choose there and what have been the pros and cons? Are you happy with your choice?

For others, in your opinion where are the most attractive places to retire abroad and why?

Gimesalot

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 666
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2014, 03:48:06 PM »
My husband and I have decided to eventually retire to Argentina.  Mostly because that is where I was born, and most of my family lives.  Its not the least expensive place, and it is pretty unstable politically, but we absolutely love the culture.

In the mean time, we plan on traveling for several years, 5 to 10 years, before settling down.  Obviously, this will give us time to explore the entire world at a very slow pace, so we can take it all in.

You may want to consider Central and South America.  I have read that you can have a great lifestyle for around $700 to $900 a month in a lot of places.  That includes great medical care, rent, food, travel, etc.  Just make sure that you live in a place where you can still claim SS (http://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10137.pdf).



MarciaB

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 484
  • Age: 58
  • Location: Oregon
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2014, 07:11:44 AM »
I am eyeing this very thing myself and am starting to plan trips to do research. I'm heading to Nicaragua in November, and next year will spend a few weeks in Vietnam.

I have a friend who moved to Montevideo Uruguay and couldn't be happier. And there are lots of blog sites out there written by folks who have picked up their lives and moved to one place or another.

What I will probably be doing is choosing to spend 6-8 months in some country, then return home for a few months. Then pick another, different location to head out to for another half-year or more, then return home. Then abroad, then home...and never settle on one particular country somewhere else, but choose to live in a different one every year.

Left

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1159
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2014, 09:39:21 AM »
my plan is to retire half the year in the US and other half in Taiwan. My family aside from my mother/sister/myself are there. The 3 of us are the only ones in the US and while I like living in the US, I like the different lifestyle of Taiwan too. Once I'm FI, I'd like to live in Taiwan for 6 months then work 2 or 3 contracts in the US, the work isn't bad and since I'd be FI, I could just not work if I choose to. But this would give me a reason to return to the US.

Exprezchef

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 80
  • Age: 51
  • Location: San Diego County, USA
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2014, 07:19:06 PM »
I caught the idea of retiring overseas a few years ago after reading an article in a financial magazine and after a little research on-line, I was sold on the idea and included it as part of my FIRE plan. During my 21 years in the military, I was fortunate enough to travel all over the world and experience other cultures. I know that the world is a more that just where I currently live. I pitched the idea to my wife she was initially steadfast against it. After four years of chipping away at her, she is finally on-board with the idea. While I would lean towards Thailand, Malaysia or Ecuador, I think we will end up in the Philippines. In our situation, it would be one of the easiest place for us to relocate. We spent a month there last year as an "exploratory trip" and lived as if we were residents and not tourists. We had a wonderful time. I am including a few links that might help out and get you started on your research.

Its funny, I mention the idea to co-workers and they think I am crazy and say things like "why would you want to leave the good-old USA?". I explain that I view the world as a book and would not want to limit myself to reading just one page. Good luck on your adventure.

http://internationalliving.com/

http://www.amazon.com/International-Living-Retiring-Overseas-Budget/dp/1118758595

johnintaiwan

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 360
  • Location: Tainan, Taiwan
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2014, 07:28:52 PM »
eyem

this is my plan exactly, except opposite. When I retire I hope to be able to leave Taiwan for a few months a year to live in the US. Cost of living, convenience and weather are just too good over here.

bogart

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1052
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2014, 07:30:45 PM »
I have watched older members (my parents' generation) of my family do this, and noticed that they seem to feel isolated, to miss being able to (more readily) visit kids/grandkids, and to be dissatisfied with the medical care available to them in the location they have chosen (which is a reasonably "typical" one among those you list, I'd guess).  Those issues may not be ones you'd have, but it's what I've observed of them.  My parents' generation of family has come from/lived all over the world, more or less (as do many of my generation) -- indeed, one member of this particular couple is not a US citizen, further complicating matters as it makes getting in to the US more difficult/constrained) so it's not like they were novices, but they don't seem (to me) to be finding it a joyful retirement.

johnintaiwan

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 360
  • Location: Tainan, Taiwan
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2014, 08:45:15 PM »
This is one of the downsides to living abroad, which is why I would like to spend more time in the US in a few years. Though even if I were to live in the us, my family and friends are spread apart now anyway. I can see the isolation being a big problem if you just move to a different country and enter retirement at the same time. That is a lot of changes. I think you need to have some kind of connection to where you move. Either friends or family or some kind of organization or something. I think joining expat forums and groups before moving would be a good idea.

besides not having my family and friends right around the corner and the typical frustrations of you world not being 100% like what you are used to, there arent many downsides.

expatartist

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1757
  • Location: The Big Lychee
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #8 on: May 11, 2014, 09:09:52 PM »
We plan to retire in Sicily. DH is an EU citizen so, paperwork-wise, it should be straightforward. We own one paid-off flat there (holiday rental) and are buying another. Property taxes are low (though taxes on assets overseas are currently complicated), and our living expenses should be between 250-350 Euro each/month. This summer we'll be spending a month there, renovating and calculating more closely what our retired COL will be.

EconDiva

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1130
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2014, 10:20:04 AM »
This is one of the downsides to living abroad, which is why I would like to spend more time in the US in a few years. Though even if I were to live in the us, my family and friends are spread apart now anyway. I can see the isolation being a big problem if you just move to a different country and enter retirement at the same time. That is a lot of changes. I think you need to have some kind of connection to where you move. Either friends or family or some kind of organization or something. I think joining expat forums and groups before moving would be a good idea.

besides not having my family and friends right around the corner and the typical frustrations of you world not being 100% like what you are used to, there arent many downsides.

Not to be pessimistic or anything, but the reality for me is that I have very few friends, a very small family I'm not close to, and no spouse/mate or children, so these are all reasons I think would make such a move easier for me compared to others.

AMustachianMurse

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 66
  • Location: A Whale's Vagina.
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #10 on: May 12, 2014, 07:26:33 PM »
I caught the idea of retiring overseas a few years ago after reading an article in a financial magazine and after a little research on-line, I was sold on the idea and included it as part of my FIRE plan. During my 21 years in the military, I was fortunate enough to travel all over the world and experience other cultures. I know that the world is a more that just where I currently live. I pitched the idea to my wife she was initially steadfast against it. After four years of chipping away at her, she is finally on-board with the idea. While I would lean towards Thailand, Malaysia or Ecuador, I think we will end up in the Philippines. In our situation, it would be one of the easiest place for us to relocate. We spent a month there last year as an "exploratory trip" and lived as if we were residents and not tourists. We had a wonderful time. I am including a few links that might help out and get you started on your research.

Its funny, I mention the idea to co-workers and they think I am crazy and say things like "why would you want to leave the good-old USA?". I explain that I view the world as a book and would not want to limit myself to reading just one page. Good luck on your adventure.

http://internationalliving.com/

http://www.amazon.com/International-Living-Retiring-Overseas-Budget/dp/1118758595

Ha! Awesome, I live in SD and have a ton of family/property in the Philippines.  The PI is definitely on my radar as far as ER, mostly for abusing erm...taking advantage of u.s. via policies in that you can only live there for <6 months at a time? (might be 3 months i'm not sure).  People ask Why the philippines?  It's dirty, poor, dangerous, etc.  and I say....almost the entire population is english speaking (which can't be said of many other ER potential countries, the beaches are...well...indescribable.  My gf and I had a luxurious vacation by philippine standards in Leyte where our bungalo opened up into the beach and cost us $50/night.  FIFTY!!  We wen't scuba diving in a reef that made the cover of Scuba magazine for $40/dive including rental.  I defy any one to find deals like that in other countries.  Also my grandma, who has alzheimers and would be relegated to a SNF in the u.s. costing thousands upon thousands of dollars a month for shoddy shoddy care, we are able to provide her with 24/7 bedside nursing care with a 1:1 ratio.  A cook.  And a driver for <400/month total. 

Manila as a city is pretty rough around the edges, and the country is hot as a mofo.  But i'm glad some one else sees the value in the PI.  Hopefully we will be in contact more exprezchef

going2ER

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 200
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #11 on: May 13, 2014, 01:11:26 PM »
We have been considering relocating for 6-8 months a year once we FIRE. We have been researching Central and South America and really like what we have seen of Uruguay so far. We are others who will likely go to different countries each year. There is so much of the world to experience that we don't want to limit ourselves to one area.

meadow lark

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4831
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #12 on: May 13, 2014, 02:45:24 PM »
I want to visit the Phillipines and consider spending lots of time there after FI.  Mostly because I have a close friend from PI who adores it and has made the beaches sound amazing.  And because Anthony Bourdain said they have the best roast pork in the world.

Eurotexan

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 166
  • Location: Texas
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #13 on: May 13, 2014, 03:38:15 PM »
I am originally from the UK and all my family is back there. I plan on going back there each summer when I FIRE, primarily to escape the Texas heat! This was one of the drivers for me for FIRE, my daughter (9) goes back each summer and I really feel like I miss out. Once I FIRE I can join all of them, can't wait!

Exprezchef

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 80
  • Age: 51
  • Location: San Diego County, USA
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #14 on: May 14, 2014, 03:14:02 PM »


Ha! Awesome, I live in SD and have a ton of family/property in the Philippines.  The PI is definitely on my radar as far as ER, mostly for abusing erm...taking advantage of u.s. via policies in that you can only live there for <6 months at a time? (might be 3 months i'm not sure).  People ask Why the philippines?  It's dirty, poor, dangerous, etc.  and I say....almost the entire population is english speaking (which can't be said of many other ER potential countries, the beaches are...well...indescribable.  My gf and I had a luxurious vacation by philippine standards in Leyte where our bungalo opened up into the beach and cost us $50/night.  FIFTY!!  We wen't scuba diving in a reef that made the cover of Scuba magazine for $40/dive including rental.  I defy any one to find deals like that in other countries.  Also my grandma, who has alzheimers and would be relegated to a SNF in the u.s. costing thousands upon thousands of dollars a month for shoddy shoddy care, we are able to provide her with 24/7 bedside nursing care with a 1:1 ratio.  A cook.  And a driver for <400/month total. 

Manila as a city is pretty rough around the edges, and the country is hot as a mofo.  But i'm glad some one else sees the value in the PI.  Hopefully we will be in contact more exprezchef
[/quote]

The reason we are looking at the Philippines are as follows: My wife was born there (She came to the US at 5yo) so we can stay there with no Visa for up to a year under the Balikbayan Program. We plan on traveling to other Asian Countries and all you have to do is leave the country for a day and the year starts over again. English is spoken everywhere except for the most remote areas so we do not have to learn a new language. My wife has family there and they are more than willing to assist us in our transition. Being retired military, the support systems are already in place due to the large number of retired military folks in the area. My current bank has affiliations with a few of the banks in the Philippines and money transfers are very easy between accounts. We plan on renting for 6 to 9 months before we would commit to buying any property just to ensure we are both sure we could live there. We would be looking at a condo for housing as we feel that would be the easiest to secure if we decide to leave for a while and travel or return to the US for extended visits.

The only thing my wife and I are in disagreement on is the location. I prefer the more rural areas such as the cooler mountain communities of Baguio or Tagatay while she wants to be closer to her family who live closer to Manila. We both really liked the Fort Bonafacio/Taguig area as it reminded us of downtown San Diego but the area is pretty pricy. I am sure it will be quite the adventure.       

FIPurpose

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1034
  • Location: WA
    • FI With Purpose
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #15 on: May 14, 2014, 05:11:15 PM »
I've personally thought a lot about Mauritius, a tiny island East of Madagascar. I've never been, but I would love to atleast feel it out for a month or two and see what it is like. Though with foreign countries, you can never tell what state they'll be in in another 10-20 years, which is what I'm looking at until retirement.

I think I could be happy living in any number of countries. The big downside would be the long plane trip to the island. Living in South America would be much closer and easier on flights back. (It's hard to imagine being able to take a month to do something I want to do since I'm still working. I just took my first week of vacation, and all I could think about was how short it felt.)

ZiziPB

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3273
  • Location: The Other Side
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #16 on: May 14, 2014, 06:17:04 PM »
I know I will be retiring abroad - basically going back to my birth country where my family still lives.  I know the COL is lower there than in the US, but I am trying to wrap my mind around the logistics of moving abroad (no issues with visas etc. as  I am a dual citizen), maintaining my investments here in the US, tax implications, etc.  If anyone has any practical advice, I would appreciate it - any links, blogs, forums etc would be helpful.  All the information I have found so far deals more with finding the right country, what goes into the selection, etc.  but I am past that stage...

mxt0133

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1559
  • Location: San Francisco
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #17 on: May 14, 2014, 10:14:01 PM »
I want to visit the Phillipines and consider spending lots of time there after FI.  Mostly because I have a close friend from PI who adores it and has made the beaches sound amazing.  And because Anthony Bourdain said they have the best roast pork in the world.

I can vouch for the best roasted pork in the world, called lechon.  I've tried Hawaiian, Chinese, Cuban, and a few others and they do not compare.  Particularly the ones from Cebu, they literally fly whole roasted pigs in boxes to different parts of the country to be served in time for dinner or an evening party.

Like most third world countries the infrastructure is not as advance, public services are less than adequate to our standards.  But if you can tolerate a little voluntary discomfort you will find the people to be extremely friendly and the pace of life much slower.

SDREMNGR

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 324
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #18 on: May 15, 2014, 01:13:51 AM »
I've enjoyed traveling and visiting various countries around the world but I do love the convenience and infrastructure of the US every time I come home.

I have seen the best that the world has to offer and while there are better subways and train systems and sceneries than the US, there are also great things in the US to see, not to mention the 51st state above us.

It's nice to visit abroad but to permanently live abroad would be hard.

RetiredAt63

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 11189
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #19 on: May 15, 2014, 06:18:01 AM »
Heaven? The idea is to retire young, not die young.

Oh, did you mean Canada? We are North of you, not above you - maps are not reality.  And despite Diane Francis, we are not the 51st state (and if we were, we would be at least 10 states plus 3 territories, we don't come that easy).

I have seen the best that the world has to offer and while there are better subways and train systems and sceneries than the US, there are also great things in the US to see, not to mention the 51st state above us.

dude

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2368
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #20 on: May 15, 2014, 07:14:05 AM »
Oh yeah, huge aspiration for my FIRE years.  But probably no more than 6 months/year, and probably no more than 3 months in one location.  Costa Rica and Mexico are at the top of my list, with Ecuador, Colombia and Thailand on there as well.  The Philippines discussion above has my interest piqued.  I too visited there when I was in the Navy, and was intrigued.  It's a huge place and I'd love to explore more.  You can stretch your dollar so much farther in many countries, and thus provide a safety net for your nest egg.

TropicNebraska

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 27
  • Age: 33
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #21 on: May 15, 2014, 08:16:16 AM »
Make sure to do your due diligence on the country's government, constitution, and property rights to make sure its not a banana republic. No point in saving a few bucks with the low cost of living when your property is seized and you're thrown into prison without due process.

iris lily

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3315
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #22 on: May 15, 2014, 08:27:00 AM »
We don't have family tying us here and we love travel, so out of country retirement has always been something that I consdier. But--

I don't like warm weather places with no seasons and I have to have a garden of not-tropicals, so many of the south of the border choices aren't attractive to me. Also, frankly, I just am not attracted to south-of-the border cultures.

I toy with the idea of Bulgaria and thereabouts--season, and in Europe. I like European culture.

I love Asian culture but would find India or Thailand hellishly hot. But I would be fascinated with everything there.

One of my fantasies is that we can live here now and spend winters in New Zealand, being garden caretakers on a huge estate with a giant flower garden. That way I would have two spring and summer seasons a year, yay!

 

dcheesi

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 856
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #23 on: May 15, 2014, 09:25:22 AM »
Make sure to do your due diligence on the country's government, constitution, and property rights to make sure its not a banana republic. No point in saving a few bucks with the low cost of living when your property is seized and you're thrown into prison without due process.
Yep. My brother had a heck of a time selling his property in Puerto Rico when he wanted to move, and that's not (technically) even a different country! Changing local politics and lack of formal property registration meant that he could only sell it to a local with the right connections.

iris lily

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3315
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #24 on: June 01, 2014, 10:41:06 PM »
Make sure to do your due diligence on the country's government, constitution, and property rights to make sure its not a banana republic. No point in saving a few bucks with the low cost of living when your property is seized and you're thrown into prison without due process.
Yep. My brother had a heck of a time selling his property in Puerto Rico when he wanted to move, and that's not (technically) even a different country! Changing local politics and lack of formal property registration meant that he could only sell it to a local with the right connections.

I think small, native style dwellings wouldn't be very expensive and if that abode wasn't securely yours and one DID "lose" it through political strife or whatever, after some years, well, not a big deal. I'd think one could buy great cottages in Bulgaria for $50,000. But then, one can buy great cottages in the middle of the U.S. for $50,000 or a bit more. So not sure why I'd got to Bulgaria other than to be in Europe which would be very fun.

But sure, if you want to live like a gringo Overlord in a McMansion, one has to be cognizant of real estate laws that protect those large investments.

NinetyFour

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6473
  • Location: Southwestern US
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #25 on: June 02, 2014, 05:52:02 AM »
This is one of the downsides to living abroad, which is why I would like to spend more time in the US in a few years. Though even if I were to live in the us, my family and friends are spread apart now anyway. I can see the isolation being a big problem if you just move to a different country and enter retirement at the same time. That is a lot of changes. I think you need to have some kind of connection to where you move. Either friends or family or some kind of organization or something. I think joining expat forums and groups before moving would be a good idea.

besides not having my family and friends right around the corner and the typical frustrations of you world not being 100% like what you are used to, there arent many downsides.

Not to be pessimistic or anything, but the reality for me is that I have very few friends, a very small family I'm not close to, and no spouse/mate or children, so these are all reasons I think would make such a move easier for me compared to others.

This (described by EconDiva) is pretty much my situation as well.

While I definitely want to do some traveling in retirement, I'm not yet sold on the idea of actually retiring abroad.  My first priority would be to travel (slowly) within the US.  I have never been to another country, other than Canada.  I am interested in getting to the British Isles and to South America.

One issue is that I am hesitant to sell my house, as it is in a very desirable town.  Plus, I live in my accessory dwelling unit and rent out my main house.  That source of income is sweet, and I'm not sure I'd want to opt out of that.

Also, I have no understanding of visa issues.  Does anyone have links for resources with basic explanations of where US citizens can go, and how long they can stay?

quilter

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 149
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2014, 06:25:44 AM »
So many interesting thoughts. Since we have small grandchildren in the US we won't be retiring elsewhere.

When I visited Australia in 2000 I would have moved there in a heartbeat, but of course distance  to family prevented us as well as real estate is very expensive defeating the idea of this thread. There are so many areas of this country where you can buy very inexpensive property with low taxes then take a month or two to travel when the mood strikes.

For example, here in Florida, there is no state income tax and property tax is way lower than NY where we moved from.  You can walk or bike every day, although thunderstorms roll through so you plan around that. Saving many thousands of dollars a year enables us to travel lots.   Of course, I can't tell you how many people told us we were crazy for moving to Florida but who would not want our life?  Check this blog out for further ideas.  http://retireearlylifestyle.com.  There are also tons of expat blogs and websites.

If I had no ties here I would explore Equador and other South American countries. I will be spending time in Thialand soon so who knows. I may find my Shangra-La.

randymarsh

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1374
  • Location: Denver
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #27 on: June 02, 2014, 07:06:32 AM »
Also, I have no understanding of visa issues.  Does anyone have links for resources with basic explanations of where US citizens can go, and how long they can stay?

This handy site will give you information on visa requirements: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html

You can go to most western European countries for up to 90 days per 180 day period for tourism/business purposes with no visa. Just show your passport when you land.

As with most things, money makes life much easier if you're trying to stay somewhere long term. Countries will issue residency visas if you can show assets of at least X. I assume that number is easily reachable by most Mustachians looking at cheaper countries.

Alectejas

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 33
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #28 on: June 02, 2014, 07:24:00 AM »
I have always thought about Latin America as a good place to retire, I like exploring other cultures and trying new things (who doesn't).  Of course it helps if you speak Spanish or Portuguese.  I like Mexico City a lot, but the crime is so bad right now that its probably not worth the risk.   Traveling is Latin America makes me appreciate the infrastructure that I tend to take for granted here in the USA.  If you go to one of the expat forums like this http://www.expatforum.com/ you can get an idea of the pros and cons of living in most of the popular destinations.

NinetyFour

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6473
  • Location: Southwestern US
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #29 on: June 02, 2014, 08:50:13 AM »
Also, I have no understanding of visa issues.  Does anyone have links for resources with basic explanations of where US citizens can go, and how long they can stay?

This handy site will give you information on visa requirements: http://travel.state.gov/content/passports/english/country.html

You can go to most western European countries for up to 90 days per 180 day period for tourism/business purposes with no visa. Just show your passport when you land.

As with most things, money makes life much easier if you're trying to stay somewhere long term. Countries will issue residency visas if you can show assets of at least X. I assume that number is easily reachable by most Mustachians looking at cheaper countries.

Thanks very much!

totoro

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2099
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #30 on: June 02, 2014, 09:19:31 AM »
I enjoy reading about this and lots of people have retired to other countries - I met many happily doing this in my travels.  I can relate to the desire to experience other cultures and live on less in a beautiful and inspiring climate/environment.

I won't be retiring abroad though. I'm not even sure I will leave Canada much.  Even though I lived overseas for a number of years, I never enjoyed being an expat as much as being at home.   I loved the new ideas, innovations and cultural ways, but I was never an insider and that did not sit right with me in the end.  I think more extroverted/entertainment oriented people would feel different.  Or people with family ties in the country they set up in.

My retirement is going to be about people - events and occasions with family and friends - and personal projects. 

basd

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 186
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #31 on: June 02, 2014, 02:53:56 PM »
I enjoy reading about this and lots of people have retired to other countries - I met many happily doing this in my travels.  I can relate to the desire to experience other cultures and live on less in a beautiful and inspiring climate/environment.

I won't be retiring abroad though. I'm not even sure I will leave Canada much.  Even though I lived overseas for a number of years, I never enjoyed being an expat as much as being at home.   I loved the new ideas, innovations and cultural ways, but I was never an insider and that did not sit right with me in the end.  I think more extroverted/entertainment oriented people would feel different.  Or people with family ties in the country they set up in.

My retirement is going to be about people - events and occasions with family and friends - and personal projects.
I'd stay in Canada too if I lived there, it's a beautiful country, especially with all the options for outdoors activities you have..

MustardTiger

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 180
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #32 on: July 07, 2014, 12:26:01 AM »
Wife is from Thailand so we plan to go there.  I think this is the main reason she is at all interested in ER.

RyanHesson

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 69
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #33 on: July 07, 2014, 12:57:20 AM »
For someone who speaks only English, my options are few (Canada, UK, Australia, that's 'bout it), and none look better than the US. I've never been anywhere other than US and Canada, so maybe there's something there I just don't get or haven't seen, but I'm just not all that inclined to step foot outside of North America. What I'd be inclined to do is retire to a cheaper part of the US. My family is all in SE Michigan, so probably there, people are still alive by then. Other than that, maybe down south somewhere. On the Gulf coast? Biloxi? Mobile? Pensacola? Haven't really looked into it much, but I love catfish.

chouchouu

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 297
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #34 on: July 07, 2014, 05:45:30 AM »
I wish to retire in Brussels and my husband is thinking Berlin/Hanoi. He is Polish and we have a summer house in the countryside so will probably head there quite a bit. I like Brussels because I can keep living costs low there for great quality of life and excellent healthcare. I haven't lived in Berlin but it seems nice, I guess I could try it out but I find Belgium relaxing and the area I like in Brusseks is walkable to everything. Brussels is ideal for me, I was happiest living there and it's a short train ride to Germany, Amsterdam, Paris and London, so friends are close and I can satiate my travel bug at little cost.

mpg350

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 150
Re: Retiring abroad
« Reply #35 on: July 07, 2014, 08:55:04 AM »
 I am really considering the Philippines.   My wife is from there and I visited earlier this year. 
I had a great time there.  The prices are cheap and people very friendly.  I had some of the best italian food ever
in Manila and it only cost like $7.     The beaches were amazing and some awesome scuba diving.   

I am thinking I might buy down the road a condo and live maybe half the year there and the other half in the US when we retire.
If the condo was paid for you could live there really really well on less than $1,000 a month.

I wouldn't want to buy a condo in Manila though...plenty of other places not so crowded and crazy and cheaper.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2014, 09:00:10 AM by mpg350 »