Author Topic: Question for Mustachian Cyclists  (Read 2206 times)

wealthviahealth

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Question for Mustachian Cyclists
« on: January 21, 2016, 09:02:55 PM »
I have a seperate thread going for my "how to save $ for a bike thread" and have been getting so much great insight from there cycling community on here that I wanted to bring the bike specifics questions over here.
I mentioned that I am looking at the Trek Emonda Sl6, Domane, and The Specialized Roubaix.

Do any of you have one of the above/ any experience on them?
I am currently evaluating the disc brake and 105 sets with non disc and Ultegra.
Would love to hear people thoughts on this as I am new to this hobby.

I live in SF and am still getting used to descending on large hills( I love going fast uphill, still a bit nervous going fast downhill)  so that has been some of my leaning towards the disc option. 

gooki

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Re: Question for Mustachian Cyclists
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2016, 12:24:08 AM »
I prefer standard brakes. I find them easier to maintain, and both the 105s and ultegras with good pads stop fucking well.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2016, 12:35:00 AM by gooki »

gooki

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Re: Question for Mustachian Cyclists
« Reply #2 on: January 22, 2016, 12:34:01 AM »
You should be able to pickup the Trek for $2,000 or less. They're that price here in NZ and UK and we don't have a competitive market.

I'd also shop around if you looking to save money. Nothing wrong with wanting to buy new, I know I did. But I paid less than $400 for a very nice Corratec bike. Sure I don't race, but I put a lot of miles on it.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2016, 03:01:29 AM by gooki »

ROY2007

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Re: Question for Mustachian Cyclists
« Reply #3 on: January 22, 2016, 11:36:05 AM »
Are you just looking for a road bike for recreation?

I sell Trek bikes so of course I'll tell you to stick with a Trek :)

Tell us more about the riding you want to use it for. The Domane is a great all around bike and is built to be comfortable with the ISO speed decoupler. The Emonda is all about being as light as possible. I don't know enough about the Roubaix.

Jeremy E.

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Re: Question for Mustachian Cyclists
« Reply #4 on: January 22, 2016, 11:47:48 AM »
I think motobecanes from bikesdirect are the best value

Rubic

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Re: Question for Mustachian Cyclists
« Reply #5 on: January 22, 2016, 07:04:01 PM »
Rim brakes are fine on a single bicycle.  I've never had a problem controlling my bike on the steepest grades all over the country with rim brakes.  Even going down the 20+% grade on Brasstown Bald in northeast Georgia.

However, I added a drum brake to the tandem bicycle after some scary descents, especially in the rain.   A disc brake might make sense if you're touring with heavy gear.

JRA64

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Re: Question for Mustachian Cyclists
« Reply #6 on: January 22, 2016, 08:24:24 PM »
Best advice I ever heard for someone new to cycling: Don't spend a lot of money on your first bike.After a year of riding, you'll have a better idea what your interests really are (cruising around town, racing, touring, mountain biking, etc) and what you're really looking for.

fallstoclimb

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Re: Question for Mustachian Cyclists
« Reply #7 on: January 23, 2016, 09:19:12 AM »
^^ This.  Those are pretty nice bikes you are looking at.  I put in 4 years on an entry level bike before I upgraded to that level.  Start with an entry level (buy it used) and then upgrade in a year or two when you know a little more. 

fallstoclimb

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Re: Question for Mustachian Cyclists
« Reply #8 on: January 23, 2016, 09:35:09 AM »
Because really, if you are new to riding you just don't know what you want yet.  My husband loves tooling around town and going on long slow rides, or adventures on rougher terrain, so all he wants are steel bikes.  I'm focusing on getting fast, so I upgraded to a pretty aggressive high end aluminum bike (the aforementioned CAAD10).  If I hadn't put in time on my entry level bike first, I would have probably gone with a carbon bike like the ones you are mentioning, but after learning my riding style I knew I wanted something that felt more responsive versus smooth & easy. 

I 100% think it is worth it to spend money on bikes (speaking as someone who has 8 built bikes + 2 frames in her house right now...) if its what you love, and cycling is a great hobby/sport/lifestyle, BUT you first need to put the time in. 

It's OK to get scared descending.  I don't like to let my speed creep much past 35 on descents.  That said, you should be fine stopping on SF hills.  Disc brakes are only really "necessary" (read: they're never actually necessary) on looooong descents where your rim brakes might overheat.  Although I think that can happen with disc brakes too?  Disc brakes are also good in cruddy or wet conditions, but if you are riding on the road you'll do just find without them with proper technique.  If you're having a hard time stopping you may need to switch out your brake pads or adjust your brake levers.