Author Topic: Please Critique My Plan For After Graduation  (Read 2185 times)

xdime00

  • Guest
Please Critique My Plan For After Graduation
« on: April 04, 2014, 06:48:13 PM »
...
« Last Edit: June 25, 2014, 09:26:58 AM by xdime00 »

jpo

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 518
  • Age: 33
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: Please Critique My Plan For After Graduation
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2014, 06:54:25 PM »
You may be able to lower your AGI an additional $3250 by contributing to a HSA.

ch12

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 593
Re: Please Critique My Plan For After Graduation
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2014, 07:32:07 PM »
Rounded up I live on < or = $25k a year. I am graduating from a Physician Assistant program in May, and will be staying in the same living situation after graduation.

I will owe $148k upon graduation, which I will need to being paying in May. Interest rates vary from 5.6-7.9%. My payment come January 2015 will be roughly 1600'ish a month.

I am estimating I should gross roughly $130k my first full year.

First year, this July to Dec, I should make roughly 55-60k.

1 - commuting is inversely proportional with happiness. It's the one thing that we can never adapt to (as Daniel Gilbert says), and having jobs in 3 cities seems like commuting x 3

2 - your hair is on fire. Do not put money in your retirement accounts until you get rid of your 7.9% student loan balance. Please.

“AAAAAUUUUUUGGGHHHH!!!! THERE IS A CLOUD OF KILLER BEES COVERING EVERY SQUARE INCH OF MY BODY AND STINGING ME CONSTANTLY!!!! I NEED TO STOP IT BEFORE I AM KILLED!!!”

http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2012/04/18/news-flash-your-debt-is-an-emergency/

3 - high MPG is of deep importance if you're going to insist on commuting to 3 different cities. Your car should be a little lower in price than $10k , but your MPG needs to be really, really, really great.

http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2012/03/19/top-10-cars-for-smart-people/

Karl

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 64
Re: Please Critique My Plan For After Graduation
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2014, 07:40:02 PM »
Consider moving closer to the first job, dropping the car, and dropping the other two jobs.  Dropping the car saves you (national average) $10K/year.  This also brings you closer to many of the tax write-offs long term.  If you *must* work a second job, look for one near the first job, but do it for only a brief period of time. 

If you burnout on your profession, the debt and degree become simply a sheet of paper.  Working three jobs does not allow you time for self-care (very important in health-care fields).