Author Topic: Other non-traditional lifestyle choices besides Mustachianism?  (Read 17275 times)

Norman Johnson

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Re: Other non-traditional lifestyle choices besides Mustachianism?
« Reply #50 on: May 05, 2012, 06:36:16 AM »
We are contemplating becoming a single income family and we have lived in the same 900sq foot house for the last eight years even though we had a baby a year ago. All three of those things are very weird here.

We are also raising our kid "free range" which I'm pretty sure we are going to catch a lot of flak for it.

Arbor33

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Re: Other non-traditional lifestyle choices besides Mustachianism?
« Reply #51 on: May 07, 2012, 09:42:24 AM »
We are also raising our kid "free range" which I'm pretty sure we are going to catch a lot of flak for it.

I see this as a very open ended term. What does "free range" mean in your environment? Could you tell us some of the guidelines you observe?

Norman Johnson

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Re: Other non-traditional lifestyle choices besides Mustachianism?
« Reply #52 on: May 07, 2012, 10:52:29 AM »
There is a website Freerangekids started by a woman who caught a huge amount of shit for letting her nine year old ride the subway home by himself. It basically boils down to letting your kids have some independence appropriate to their age and capabilities instead of hovering all the time.

Our son is only one, so we are pretty limited on what we can let him do. But for example, our coffee table has drawers and he's been allowed in and out of the since he figured out how they worked. He pinched his fingers a few times in the beginning, but really, how much force does a nine month old have? At this point he hasn't pinched his fingers in forever.

As he gets older, we intend to let him have more freedom to roam our neighbourhood and walk to and from school. But it really depends on how much we think he can handle.

kdms

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Re: Other non-traditional lifestyle choices besides Mustachianism?
« Reply #53 on: May 07, 2012, 01:00:10 PM »
I had to laugh when I saw the comment about pinched fingers....none of our lower cupboards have doors on them, with the exception of a single bank of drawers.  Our 19-month old has gotten his fingers pinched in them more than once and pays absolutely zippo attention to the cupboards. 

If letting kids learn and develop their skills their with a minimum of interference and with an appropriate amount of guidance (and prudence) is the definition of free range, then we're all over it.  Who's got time to hover?  We all fell down and explored and came looking for help when we needed it as kids.  I've got a neighbour whose 7-year old still has training wheels on her bike because the parent doesn't think she's capable of riding a bike without them.

We're also trying to figure out how to get down to a single income (which a lot of people can't understand), and we're getting better at growing and preserving our own food.  People think we're nuts for taking one night a week to drive around to all of our locally sourced farms for our weekly groceries, but hey, we know it's clean food, locally grown, and as a bonus, no taxes, middle men, or inflated prices due to price settings and controls. 

James

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Re: Other non-traditional lifestyle choices besides Mustachianism?
« Reply #54 on: May 07, 2012, 02:06:40 PM »
There is a website Freerangekids started by a woman who caught a huge amount of shit for letting her nine year old ride the subway home by himself. It basically boils down to letting your kids have some independence appropriate to their age and capabilities instead of hovering all the time.

Our son is only one, so we are pretty limited on what we can let him do. But for example, our coffee table has drawers and he's been allowed in and out of the since he figured out how they worked. He pinched his fingers a few times in the beginning, but really, how much force does a nine month old have? At this point he hasn't pinched his fingers in forever.

As he gets older, we intend to let him have more freedom to roam our neighbourhood and walk to and from school. But it really depends on how much we think he can handle.

My wife has read the blog http://freerangekids.wordpress.com/ for years, it is a good source of ideas and amusement.  :)

What we do in our small town in northern Wisconsin would be called "free range" in many areas, but for our area it's pretty normal.  Our 12 year old biked 5 miles through town to school and back when the weather was decent last year.  I consider our kids pretty free range, though we don't use those terms much.

Arbor33

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Re: Other non-traditional lifestyle choices besides Mustachianism?
« Reply #55 on: May 08, 2012, 07:50:56 AM »
Ah, I see. "Free range" means proper parenting.

I dig it. Thanks for the explanation!

Bakari

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Re: Other non-traditional lifestyle choices besides Mustachianism?
« Reply #56 on: May 08, 2012, 02:33:49 PM »
Ah, I see. "Free range" means proper parenting.

I dig it. Thanks for the explanation!

I would never have thought there was even a term for it!

When I was in elementary school the majority of kids walked to/from school on their own.
And I'm really not that old!

I didn't even know that this was now considered an "alternative"

I was expecting something more like the SummerHill School (which everyone commenting on freerange children would probably be interested in - the book has the same name as the school) which I intent to model my parenting after if/when I have kids

smalllife

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Re: Other non-traditional lifestyle choices besides Mustachianism?
« Reply #57 on: June 09, 2012, 05:45:53 PM »
Loving the responses so far!

I'm childfree.
I will be car-lite when I move in a couple of months (yay for bike-centric neighborhoods!).  My car is still fairly new, but I have high hopes of being carfree either when it dies or if I pass it to my younger sister in 4 or 5 years.
If I can help it, I won't have a TV (might have to give in order to attract roommates).
I'm an atheist.
I identify with the minimalist movement, voluntary simplicity, eco-friendly beauty products and limiting chemical exposure kind of thing.  I make my own deodorant, use soap for pretty much everything (except shampoo), vinegar and baking soda for cleaning products.
I try to reduce my plastic usage as much as possible, a la Zero Waste Home.