Author Topic: Mustachian Relocation Guide  (Read 180554 times)

sisto

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #250 on: July 16, 2018, 09:58:53 AM »
I would love to have Merida, MEX added. Also love to hear about any places in MEX. Seriously considering relocating there post FIRE.

magnet18

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #251 on: August 08, 2018, 09:27:56 AM »
I can chime in from Fort Wayne, IN.


  • Fort Wayne, IN, USA
  • If a suburb, distance from city: N/A
    There are various suburbs, but they are all considered "in" the city. 
    Downtown is very small, not sure what's there, I almost never go there.  Southwest and northwest side of town is where I frequent.
    Southwest side if town is best for bike-ability, to things like grocery stores and parks.
    There are also various commuter towns, I am fond of churubusco, when I lived in town there it was a 15 minute drive to my engineering job in Fort Wayne, at 60mph the whole way.
  • Average housing cost (specify rent or buy):CHEAP!!!
    Fort Wayne has some of the lowest cost of living in the country, a mustachian should be able to build their dream house here for $200K
  • Indoor Hobbies: Whatever you want?
    Land is cheap, housing is cheap, no reason not to have as much indoor space as you want, including barns if you're into working on your own cars or big projects (especially in the winter)

    Easy to grow crops for your own brewing.
  • Outdoor Hobbies:require a mustachian attitude
    Plenty of gardening or homesteading options
    Winters here suck.  Not that they're too cold or snowy to do anything, they suck in that it's not cold enough for long enough.  Snow-thaw-repeat all winter long.

    There are plenty of state parks in weekend-trip distance, i live close enough to one for afternoon hikes.
    Kayaking and watersports aplenty in the summer.
    The mountain biking scene is probably similar to that in any Midwest City... Tame... Because it's flat
  • Weather (High Temps, Low Temps, Seasons, Sun):REPLACE ME
    Highs in the 100s and humid in the summer, drove to work at -20 one morning last winter, so you get the full range.

    Noone brags about the weather here.

    October-Christmas is delightful though.
  • Favorite things:
    Cheap!  Lowest cost of living in the country.
    No smog checks!
    What are taxes?  Property ones are basically non-existent.
    Very clean air.
    A very clean city for the most part.
    Almost no crime.
    Almost no traffic.
    Almost no homelessness.
    A good clean well run conservative city.
  • Least favorite things:
    Winters
    There aren't many options for full time RVing
    Food is all mediocre and you'll wait 45 minutes to get seated anyway
    The average citizen is obese, uneducated, and driving an SUV
    You absolutely need a car to get by.  Not designed for bikes at all (newer parts of town are getting better)
    Standard Midwest sprawl.  Land is cheap, so buildings are big, spread out, and parking lots are huge
  • 'Must Try':
    Can't think of anything
  • Stupid ordinances/laws:
    Can't think of anything
  • Words of wisdom/Advice:
    Can't think of anything
  • Sustainability options (gardening, solar, etc):
    Could definitely profit from solar, but it would be a challenge to go 100% off grid (not impossible)
    Gardens grow like crazy, and greenhouses could be easy in the winter.
    Could heat with wood for free.
    Water is free and infinite, most people have wells.
[/quote]

TxAg70

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #252 on: August 11, 2018, 11:25:21 AM »
I would like to request Ft. Worth, TX. I could move there from my job in more rural TX but housing costs are probably gonna be a bit higher and I'd like some idea from the mustachians in Ft. Worth about where to look.

aashusharma1

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #253 on: August 15, 2018, 07:16:56 AM »
Hi All,

A relocation related question not really info on the cities. How about the adding info on the investment landscape if we are moving across countries. Also what to do with investments we have currently.

In my case I am planning to move to Canada in an year or two and i was wondering when i make that move I will have to withdraw from my 401, HSA and multiple Roth accounts which i am currently max-ing out. And that will entail penalties as i am withdrawing before retirement. What should be my strategy,
----should I reduce my contributions to the HSA -assuming i may still have medical needs till i move
----Reduce 401 contribution just enough to get the employer match
----Stop contributing to Roth IRA accounts?
----Should i invest more in individual stocks in the meanwhile

All this would mean more cash in hand which i can put in CDs etc and it will be easy to move when i finally move to Canada.

Thanks in advance!
Cheers

RichMoose

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #254 on: August 15, 2018, 09:24:07 AM »
Hi All,

A relocation related question not really info on the cities. How about the adding info on the investment landscape if we are moving across countries. Also what to do with investments we have currently.

In my case I am planning to move to Canada in an year or two and i was wondering when i make that move I will have to withdraw from my 401, HSA and multiple Roth accounts which i am currently max-ing out. And that will entail penalties as i am withdrawing before retirement. What should be my strategy,
----should I reduce my contributions to the HSA -assuming i may still have medical needs till i move
----Reduce 401 contribution just enough to get the employer match
----Stop contributing to Roth IRA accounts?
----Should i invest more in individual stocks in the meanwhile

All this would mean more cash in hand which i can put in CDs etc and it will be easy to move when i finally move to Canada.

Thanks in advance!
Cheers

US-Canada tax arrangements can be very complicated and often require an accountant specializing in cross border moves to get things done efficiently and correctly.
A better thread might be the Canada Tax thread on this forum as some other Mustachians have done/are doing this move.

jscott2135

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #255 on: August 25, 2018, 07:52:16 PM »
Currently live in Bend, OR.  Since this post was originally made, Bend has gotten even more crowded and home prices have gone up a bit. But I love my home state to death and having lived in Eugene, Hillsboro and now Bend am happy to help answer any questions about these areas as well!

azu612

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #256 on: September 23, 2018, 10:11:57 AM »
Anyone have any information on locations in New Hampshire and Vermont?

dougules

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #257 on: September 25, 2018, 11:39:02 AM »
Since there was a request for Huntsville, I'll put in my 2 as a native.  Full disclosure, I'm not really enamored with it, and a driver for FIRE for me is to be able to move somewhere that's a better fit.  I'll try to be neutral since the area is good for some people.  A different take from somebody else in the area wouldn't be a bad thing. 

Huntsville, Alabama

Average housing cost: This gets us to the best part first.  It's easy to find a decent smaller older house for <$100k, maybe a tad more if you want new, big, and/or a better school district.  $200k will buy you something big and fancy. 

Indoor Hobbies:  Lots of nerdy pursuits.  If you want to 3D print a detailed 6ft replica of the Millenium Falcon or fab PCBs in your garage, this is the place for you.  Craft beer is a thing in a lot of places now, but Huntsville is keeping up in that arena.

Outdoor Hobbies: The area is decent here.  The city nestles up to a mountain with a large state park.  The Tennessee River is big and is great for water activities.  Plenty of smaller rivers for canoes and kayaks.  Plenty of hiking around including trails that start only a mile from downtown.  It's one of the best places in the country for spelunking, or does this go under "indoor hobbies"?  Gardening is popular.  Hunting and fishing are big here.  If you're into football, you'll feel right at home.

Weather: At least it's not boring.  The one guarantee is that it will be steamy from May to September.  We don't really have spring and fall  so much as random switches back and forth between winter and summer.  Winter can be just about anything.  Pick a number between 10 and 70.  Then pick a completely different number the next day.  Snow and ice is on average only about once every other winter although it's unpredictable.  It's a big event when it does snow.  We actually get more total average rainfall than Seattle, but the average doesn't tell the story.  It can be gloomy for a month straight, but it can also be sunny for a month straight.  Really, though, most of it comes in storms that pop up, drain a lake somewhere in heaven, then go away.  The storms can also be pretty strong.  The area is just as much a part of tornado alley as Oklahoma or Kansas.  Our tornadoes aren't the pretty ones, though.  They come at night hidden behind a curtain of blinding rain and hail.  Also, it's not necessarily weather, but in April the pollen is thick enough to look like yellow paint.  Allergy sufferers, you've been warned.

Favorite things:  I actually really enjoy thunderstorms.  Very lush and green.  Housing is dirt cheap.  Good for hiking and canoeing.  Great place to nerd out. 

Least Favorite things:  Transportation=driving.  Lots of sprawl.  Far right politics.  Can we talk about something other than football, fishing, or church?  The most expensive airport in the country. 

Must Try:  Southern food.  Locals will roll their eyes, but yes, you should see our real Saturn V rocket. We have the largest antebellum district in Alabama. 

Stupid ordinances/laws:  9% sales tax to fund all the asphalt.  Schools aren't very good. 

Words of Wisdom:  What you think of the area very much depends on who you are.  People who are more likely to like it here are those who don't mind driving, are focused on LCOL over other factors, don't mind hot weather, don't have allergy issues, enjoy college football, and those who are nerdy, religious, married, conservative, or introverted.  The more of those that fit you, the more likely you are to enjoy being here. 

Sustainability:  Not really a big thing here. The nerd factor does make for some interest in electric cars and solar energy, though. 

Some comments on various surrounding areas:  It's rural Alabama and Tennessee, so I think you have some idea.  It is relatively cheap in the area to live on a lake front, with a mountain top view, or on a large plot of land.  Smith Lake and Guntersville are popular areas along those lines. 

palee

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #258 on: January 27, 2019, 06:28:21 AM »
  • City, State, Country:
    Louisville, KY, USA
  • Average housing cost (specify rent or buy):
    Rent and mortgage monthly payments are fairly equal; $1000/mo will get you a 2bd 2ba residence close to amenities. Decrease cost for less desirable neighborhoods and increase for more.
  • Indoor Hobbies:
    Museums, music, breweries, distilleries, libraries
  • Outdoor Hobbies:
    Biking, hiking, many metro parks that are all in the process of being connected by a bikeable and walkable trail, approx. 100 miles around the county (which is the city). The Ohio river for boating. Outdoor festivals almost every weekend. Pop-up Bier gardens and flea markets. Many farmers markets. Neighborhood pools and quarries for swimming. AAA baseball and soccer clubs are popular events.
  • Weather (High Temps, Low Temps, Seasons, Sun):
    January is the coolest month with an average high of 41 degrees and an average low of 21 degrees. July is the warmest with an average high of 89 degrees and a low of 69 degrees. Relative high humidity but not nearly as high as the deep south. Louisville averages 195 days of sun per year.
  • Favorite things:
    Great dining scene, friendly people, abundance of free activities available, school transportation options, no tax on groceries, easy access to several airports in the region, diverse population
  • Least favorite things:
    Too far from beaches, subpar roadways, school options for special needs lacking, state economy lags behind the city
  • 'Must Try':
    Churchill Downs, Falls of the Ohio, the Olmstead Parks (Cherokee, Iroquois, and Shawnee being the biggest of many), cave and cavern tours, Louisville Megacavern ziplines, Muhammad Ali center, Slugger Museum, Speed Art Museum, The Water Tower museum, The metro park system & Big Four walking bridge over the river, Dining in NuLu, walking down Bardstown Road
  • Stupid ordinances/laws:
    tax on required insurance
  • Words of wisdom/Advice:
    Get out to free events and be willing to talk to anyone; they will talk with you and make recommendations
  • Sustainability options (gardening, solar, etc):
    Decent potential for solar; solar share purchase available through the local utility provider of gas & electric. Most power in the city is water and coal powered. Zone 6/7 for gardening and community gardens accessible, as well as CSAs in the area.
[/quote]

Cool Friend

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #259 on: February 05, 2019, 07:38:32 AM »
Request for Savannah, Georgia! I visited for a weekend some years ago and thought it was a very beautiful place.

Geographer

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #260 on: March 03, 2019, 05:42:27 PM »
Would be nice to get some more cities from the southeast US on here. How about Columbia SC, Savannah GA, or Jacksonville FL? Specifically from a walkability/bikeability perspective?

ForwardThinker

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #261 on: March 04, 2019, 01:23:34 PM »
I'd love a review of the Lancaster, PA area.  Thanks!

thisismyusername

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #262 on: March 26, 2019, 02:41:36 PM »
Salt Lake City, UT

Average housing cost: If you want to live in the city itself within an easy bike ride or transit to the downtown area, then you're looking at $300,000-$350,000 for a small 100-year old bungalow, and then it goes up from there depending on the exact location in the city, size of the house, etc.
If you are willing to live in some of the "undesirable" parts of the city, you can still get a house for under $275,000. The undesirable parts are not really that bad, just more run down, more crime, the usual. If you so desire you can push out to the suburbs and get a McHouse new build for cheaper or more expensive, depending on which suburb. COL in general is going up because of a large influx of people.

Rent is variable - you can rent one of the aforementioned small bungalows for about $1700; you can rent a new build studio downtown for $1200. Some really old small apartments I've seen for rent for around $900-1000, although I don't know if that's true anymore. It just varies.

Indoor Hobbies: SLC has one of the best indoor climbing gyms out there (The Front), as well as another climbing gym on the other side of town. Mormonism is common here, so a lot of indoor church-based activities. Your typical bars, bar trivia, board games, meetups, museums, etc. People don't really move here for the indoor activities. There is an indoor farmers' market in the winter. The library is really cool.

Outdoor Hobbies: In the winter, all manners of snowsports - skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing. If you're in the city the slopes are about 45 minutes-1 hour away, although there is a bus that can take you out there. As far as I know the season passes for areas like Brighton and Snowbird are very expensive. The rest of the year you have hiking of all sorts (mountainous, desert, flat areas, you pick), rock climbing, lakes nearby, National parks, outdoor farmers' markets, and there are frequently festivals going on downtown.

Weather: I moved here specifically because it gets a lot of sun all year, even in the winter. Utah is one of the most extreme weather places I've lived. It gets up to the 90s/100s in the summer and down to the teens in the winter with snow. Spring and fall are very short. As a whole the weather is decent, and it's very dry so you don't have to deal with humidity. I do feel like the winter lasts longer than I'd prefer - it gets cold in October and snows and stays cold until April. You will have to pay for heating and for air conditioning, unless you're willing to suffer through the summer without it. It does not rain very much; it's a high desert.

Favorite things: I am not a snowsport person, but for people who are, that's definitely it for them. As for me, I like SLC because it's an "all right" city. It has all the amenities of a city - major airport, bars, museums, restaurants, large central park, major university, capitol - without being huge, and it is very close to almost every type of nature you could be interested in. It's in the valley of snowy mountain ranges on all sides which are beautiful, but drive a couple of hours and you're in the desert. I was able to afford a house here, which I could not in Portland where I was living before. The rock climbing gym is really good and there is lots of outdoor rock climbing to be had just minutes away. I like the architecture of the houses and old buildings in the city.

Least Favorite things: I have a lot of least favorite things here, because as a whole I just find SLC to be 'okay' but not great.
Air pollution is bad here. It's some of the worst in the country because of the inversion, and the commuter culture doesn't help. The city itself is quite small, but there is a huge population of suburbs around it that people commute in from. The multitudes of highways, billboards, strip malls, etc. make for a pretty ugly city, but the mountains help buffer that.
I do not feel like wages are keeping up with the rapidly rising COL.
The elephant in the room - the control the LDS church has over the government. The crazy liquor laws, the fact that Mormon leaders are consulted by lawmakers, etc., etc. Gerrymandering has contributed to a right-wing majority.
Additionally, the Mormon culture and its effect on the populace. Mormons in general are pretty nice but in SLC it has created this culture of perfection and 'sameness', even for those who are no longer Mormon. Everyone looks the same, there is a lot of focus on appearance so there are tons of plastic surgery places, hair salons, you-name-it. I look nothing like your typical Mormon and even though I'm comfortable with that it's hard not to feel a bit like an outcast. There just isn't a lot of diversity of types of people here, unless you really hunt them down.
The general commuter, consumer, oblivious culture is big here, and has been hard to deal with after living in Portland. People drive big cars for 1-2 hours every day to their giant new-build houses in the suburbs that don't have recycling and it doesn't bother them and they don't care.
The city is not very walkable at all. There are a few patches here and there, and if you live near downtown you'll be okay, but as a whole the blocks are HUGE and things are just very spread out.
My major beef is that, while I have met a lot of great people, the larger culture is less progressive (in every way, not just political) than I'd prefer.

Must Try: There's nothing specific to SLC that I feel like is worth commenting on, but in general just the access to nature is hard to beat. Lots of National Parks, mountains, deserts, etc. I'm sure there are snowsport-related things I could mention here. There is a very strange outdoor sculpture garden called Gilgal Gardens that is worth seeing. The temple is cool to check out.

Stupid ordinances/laws: All the liquor laws. Beers on draft and in the grocery store can't be more than 4% ABV. You can't have a cocktail with more than I think 1 shot's worth of alcohol. You can't have two drinks at a time (or something like that). You can't buy high percentage alcohol on Sunday. The legal BAC limit is 0.05%. You can only buy wine, hard alcohol, and high percentage beer from government-run liquor stores. The list goes on.

Words of Wisdom: You move here either for a job or because you like mountains and their associated activities. It is a pretty neat city overall and still relatively affordable compared to the west coast cities, but most of the people I know moved here because they liked skiing and wanted to be close to mountains. I know people who move from the east and south like it more than I think people who have moved from other western areas do.

Sustainability:  I see more efforts in the city itself than in the outskirts. Potential for solar energy is pretty good because it's frequently sunny. Vegetable gardening is easy, and fruit trees are common. There are some community gardens. You can put compost in the yard waste bins. Some areas will give you rebates for installing 'waterwise' landscaping.


stoaX

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #263 on: March 28, 2019, 03:25:56 PM »
Salt Lake City, UT

Average housing cost: If you want to live in the city itself within an easy bike ride or transit to the downtown area, then you're looking at $300,000-$350,000 for a small 100-year old bungalow, and then it goes up from there depending on the exact location in the city, size of the house, etc.
If you are willing to live in some of the "undesirable" parts of the city, you can still get a house for under $275,000. The undesirable parts are not really that bad, just more run down, more crime, the usual. If you so desire you can push out to the suburbs and get a McHouse new build for cheaper or more expensive, depending on which suburb. COL in general is going up because of a large influx of people.

Rent is variable - you can rent one of the aforementioned small bungalows for about $1700; you can rent a new build studio downtown for $1200. Some really old small apartments I've seen for rent for around $900-1000, although I don't know if that's true anymore. It just varies.

Indoor Hobbies: SLC has one of the best indoor climbing gyms out there (The Front), as well as another climbing gym on the other side of town. Mormonism is common here, so a lot of indoor church-based activities. Your typical bars, bar trivia, board games, meetups, museums, etc. People don't really move here for the indoor activities. There is an indoor farmers' market in the winter. The library is really cool.

Outdoor Hobbies: In the winter, all manners of snowsports - skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing. If you're in the city the slopes are about 45 minutes-1 hour away, although there is a bus that can take you out there. As far as I know the season passes for areas like Brighton and Snowbird are very expensive. The rest of the year you have hiking of all sorts (mountainous, desert, flat areas, you pick), rock climbing, lakes nearby, National parks, outdoor farmers' markets, and there are frequently festivals going on downtown.

Weather: I moved here specifically because it gets a lot of sun all year, even in the winter. Utah is one of the most extreme weather places I've lived. It gets up to the 90s/100s in the summer and down to the teens in the winter with snow. Spring and fall are very short. As a whole the weather is decent, and it's very dry so you don't have to deal with humidity. I do feel like the winter lasts longer than I'd prefer - it gets cold in October and snows and stays cold until April. You will have to pay for heating and for air conditioning, unless you're willing to suffer through the summer without it. It does not rain very much; it's a high desert.

Favorite things: I am not a snowsport person, but for people who are, that's definitely it for them. As for me, I like SLC because it's an "all right" city. It has all the amenities of a city - major airport, bars, museums, restaurants, large central park, major university, capitol - without being huge, and it is very close to almost every type of nature you could be interested in. It's in the valley of snowy mountain ranges on all sides which are beautiful, but drive a couple of hours and you're in the desert. I was able to afford a house here, which I could not in Portland where I was living before. The rock climbing gym is really good and there is lots of outdoor rock climbing to be had just minutes away. I like the architecture of the houses and old buildings in the city.

Least Favorite things: I have a lot of least favorite things here, because as a whole I just find SLC to be 'okay' but not great.
Air pollution is bad here. It's some of the worst in the country because of the inversion, and the commuter culture doesn't help. The city itself is quite small, but there is a huge population of suburbs around it that people commute in from. The multitudes of highways, billboards, strip malls, etc. make for a pretty ugly city, but the mountains help buffer that.
I do not feel like wages are keeping up with the rapidly rising COL.
The elephant in the room - the control the LDS church has over the government. The crazy liquor laws, the fact that Mormon leaders are consulted by lawmakers, etc., etc. Gerrymandering has contributed to a right-wing majority.
Additionally, the Mormon culture and its effect on the populace. Mormons in general are pretty nice but in SLC it has created this culture of perfection and 'sameness', even for those who are no longer Mormon. Everyone looks the same, there is a lot of focus on appearance so there are tons of plastic surgery places, hair salons, you-name-it. I look nothing like your typical Mormon and even though I'm comfortable with that it's hard not to feel a bit like an outcast. There just isn't a lot of diversity of types of people here, unless you really hunt them down.
The general commuter, consumer, oblivious culture is big here, and has been hard to deal with after living in Portland. People drive big cars for 1-2 hours every day to their giant new-build houses in the suburbs that don't have recycling and it doesn't bother them and they don't care.
The city is not very walkable at all. There are a few patches here and there, and if you live near downtown you'll be okay, but as a whole the blocks are HUGE and things are just very spread out.
My major beef is that, while I have met a lot of great people, the larger culture is less progressive (in every way, not just political) than I'd prefer.

Must Try: There's nothing specific to SLC that I feel like is worth commenting on, but in general just the access to nature is hard to beat. Lots of National Parks, mountains, deserts, etc. I'm sure there are snowsport-related things I could mention here. There is a very strange outdoor sculpture garden called Gilgal Gardens that is worth seeing. The temple is cool to check out.

Stupid ordinances/laws: All the liquor laws. Beers on draft and in the grocery store can't be more than 4% ABV. You can't have a cocktail with more than I think 1 shot's worth of alcohol. You can't have two drinks at a time (or something like that). You can't buy high percentage alcohol on Sunday. The legal BAC limit is 0.05%. You can only buy wine, hard alcohol, and high percentage beer from government-run liquor stores. The list goes on.

Words of Wisdom: You move here either for a job or because you like mountains and their associated activities. It is a pretty neat city overall and still relatively affordable compared to the west coast cities, but most of the people I know moved here because they liked skiing and wanted to be close to mountains. I know people who move from the east and south like it more than I think people who have moved from other western areas do.

Sustainability:  I see more efforts in the city itself than in the outskirts. Potential for solar energy is pretty good because it's frequently sunny. Vegetable gardening is easy, and fruit trees are common. There are some community gardens. You can put compost in the yard waste bins. Some areas will give you rebates for installing 'waterwise' landscaping.

Good job - thanks!  I lived in the Salt Lake suburbs many years ago and may move back.  Despite the negatives you mention, those mountains are irresistible.  The lack of humidity is a bonus.  And I never had a problem with the "mormon-ess", but I'm not sensitive to those kinds of things.

chasesfish

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #264 on: April 08, 2019, 07:28:25 AM »
@hoping2retire35 - Loved your review on Charleston.  Not sure if you ares still posting, but just how hot could it be if you run at 3pm in the afternoon?  Looking to relocate from Dallas, TX and the heat you described for 6-8 weeks is basically mid-June until early October here.

waltworks

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #265 on: April 08, 2019, 10:49:23 AM »
Salt Lake City, UT

I'd add, on the negative side - there is pretty bad air pollution in winter (PM2.5) and summer as well (ozone). We lived in SLC briefly 7 years ago and found it to be unacceptable, especially with small children (so we moved 30 minutes away to Park City).

Education funding in UT is 49th or 50th in the nation (we fight with Idaho for that last place distinction) and teacher shortages/turnover are a big problem. Overall test scores are good because of the mostly Mormon population (who tend to be diligent students) but the quality of education is lower than those test scores indicate, IMO. Most non-LDS upper middle class parents in SLC send their kids to private schools.

The population is growing very fast (both high birthrate and migration) and pollution/congestion problems are probably going to be much worse in the future. It's not LA yet but the traffic is pretty darn bad if you have to get around town during normal business hours - I literally won't go to SLC from about 7-10am and then 3-6pm. Bike infrastructure is meh, you'll want to be confident sharing the road with cars if you bike commute.

The climbing and skiing are indeed excellent, and access to the desert is great if you get sick of winter. Of course, I never get sick of winter, so there's that.

I don't think most Mustachians would notice the LDS culture thing much, or be bothered by it. I have plenty of LDS friends and they're very nice folks who will politely have a cup of tea while they chat with you while you drink your coffee. Think Ned Flanders, not pushy evangelists (though if you decide to express an interest in the religion, you will get more information than you want).

-W
« Last Edit: April 08, 2019, 10:53:11 AM by waltworks »

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #266 on: April 08, 2019, 11:15:39 AM »
Salt Lake City, UT
Education funding in UT is 49th or 50th in the nation (we fight with Idaho for that last place distinction) and teacher shortages/turnover are a big problem. Overall test scores are good because of the mostly Mormon population (who tend to be diligent students) but the quality of education is lower than those test scores indicate, IMO. Most non-LDS upper middle class parents in SLC send their kids to private schools.
On the subject of education, Utah is very homeschooling-friendly, and there are a ton of homeschooling groups, co-ops, meetups, etc.

waltworks

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #267 on: April 08, 2019, 01:08:45 PM »
On the subject of education, Utah is very homeschooling-friendly, and there are a ton of homeschooling groups, co-ops, meetups, etc.

That is a good point, for those who are interested in homeschooling, UT makes it very, very easy. You basically just fill out a form and the state will provide you with access to a ton of online and other resources.

Be aware that a lot of the homeschoolers in UT are VERY weird LDS people, but in SLC proper you can find more "normal" folks doing homeschooling.

You can also do a mixed home/public school thing if you want to mix it up. We may do that ourselves as our kids are both a couple of grades ahead at only 6/4 years old.

-W

ultimoblaze

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #268 on: May 28, 2019, 09:24:48 PM »
  • City, State, Country: Cincinnati, Ohio

    I've lived in Cincinnati now for 8 years. I moved here fresh out of university as an engineering major and have spend most of that time working directly or indirectly for GE. I'm not a social person and don't get out much so I'll fill in what I know and maybe somebody can fill in interesting things. Here is a link to the wikipedia page for more information: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cincinnati

  • If a suburb, distance from city: N/A

    Cincinnati, being on the border of Ohio and Kentucky on the Ohio river has a sprawling metro area to the north. Across the river to the south in Kentucky is generally considered to be part of the Cincinnati metro area. The Cincinnati airport is actually in Hebron, KY. The Cincinnati loop, I275, is the largest loop in the US which gives you some idea of the sprawl.

  • Average housing cost (specify rent or buy): $144,400*

    The number shown is Zillow's median estimate in the city limits as of the date of this post. The central Cininnati neighborhoods are fairly old constructions (early 1900s), but in the last few years there has been some development to restore or replace a lot of the old houses. In the popular neighborhoods, renting is a better option (unless you like fixing old houses). The suburbs to the north side of the loop is where most young families tend to go and the housing up there is newer so expect to pay more. I don't know anybody that has paid more than $250k for a house though with most paying in the $170k range for a 3/2 with attached garage.

    The real benefit here is that there are a lot of potential rental properties that are very affordable. Cincinnati has 2 good sized Universities, University of Cincinnati and Xavier University, and a multi-family in the general vicinity is worth it's weight in gold. There are a lot of multi-family houses available and deals are everywhere if you're willing to do some work. I've personally purchased 2 properties; the first a 3 family that was foreclosed and vandalized that I got for $16,000 (that's not a typo) which I've been renovating and renting and the second a quad which I paid $117k for and already had tenants paying rent.

  • Indoor Hobbies: Microbreweries, ?
    This is where I don't know much. I hear from friends and colleagues that there are some good beer places, but I don't drink so I have no reference. There are museums and a decent Aquarium just across the river. I also heard that Cincinnati has a large library system. They look pretty nice, but I haven't used them.

  • Outdoor Hobbies: ?
    Again, I don't get out much so I can't provide much input here. People here like the Bengals and the Reds. We recently got a professional soccer team, I guess. There are a fair amount of public parks around, but cycling is difficult due to the sprawl and congested roads. A few of the suburbs and Cincinnati do festivals (Taste of Cincinnati, Taste of Blue Ash, etc) where local restaurants get together and sell at food stands with live music and such. I did get to see REO Speedwagon a few years back for free.

  • Weather (High Temps, Low Temps, Seasons, Sun): Hot Summers 90+, Mild Winters 20-
    Cincinnati, in my opinion, is right about average. I've lived in Florida and Wisconsin before and I can say that it does get hot in the summers and it is somewhat humid, but not horrible and winter gets just cold enough and 3-4 snowfalls to be annoying. I'm pretty sure the city doesn't own a snowplow, they just dump salt on everything so those few days a year commuting after a snowfall are brutal. I typically leave my motorcycle in the garage from November through March though I see people braver than I am riding every month as there is usually a warm week or two even in January and February. Highs in the summer are frequently in the low to mid 90s and lows in the winter are typically in the 20s.

  • Favorite things: Cost of Living
    I've not lived in an area with cheaper housing costs. I think Cincinnati is a great area to own a house and even better to be a landlord. Utilities aren't expensive and property taxes are fairly low.

  • Least favorite things: Local taxes, traffic, public transporation
    I've read a few of these posts and nobody seems to mention the largest expense for most people: taxes. Ohio income taxes are a bit lower than average, but unlike Texas, they exist. Expect to pay 3-5%. Sales tax depends on the county, but 6.5-7% seems to be common. Also, in the Cincinnati area at least, most places have a local income tax. The City of Cincinnati will take 2.1% from your income (no deductions for this either), but there are a few townships in the loop that don't have the tax.

    Traffic sucks, but I would probably complain about that everywhere. Cincinnati has 3 interstates going through it, 71, 75 and 74. Traffic is a mess at the Ohio river going into Kentucky as a lot of people commute from Kentucky to Cincinnati. The 2.1% tax doesn't even provide for a decent public transportation system. The buses exist and can be useful if you want to go downtown or away from downtown. There is a new tram that was built to serve the downtown areas.

  • 'Must Try': Cincinnati Chili?

    Most native Cincinnatians rave about Skyline Chili (or Gold Star or Blue Ash). It's just chili on a hot dog with shredded cheese or on spaghetti. It's not bad, but nothing to write home about. Goetta is a local food. Never had it, but here is what wikipedia says: Goetta is a meat-and-grain sausage or mush of German inspiration.

  • Stupid ordinances/laws: ??

    Not sure about this one either. There is zoning, so it is hard to find a house within walking/biking distance places to shop.

  • Words of wisdom/Advice: Be a landlord!

    Live in a tax free municipality. You'll save considerable taxes from that alone.
    Buy rental properties, preferably near popular locations or the universities.
    Live as close as you can to your work. Avoid traffic, save money and life energy by commuting less.

  • Sustainability options (gardening, solar, etc): ??

    I don't know much about this either. I don't see a lot of solar around nor a lot of gardens though I'm not aware of any regulations restricting them.

If anybody has has a review of the Dallas area I'd be interested in learning about it.

Ultimoblaze
« Last Edit: May 28, 2019, 09:27:08 PM by ultimoblaze »

aalferez

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #269 on: June 04, 2019, 08:22:37 AM »
I'm going to chime in since this forum gave me so much.
There is already a guide on Chicago but I have some other things to add to it.

I have lived in Chicago for 8 years now. I moved here from Madrid, Spain.

Chicago, IL, USA

I lived in several areas: Lakeview, Gold coast, downtown, Logan Square

Average housing cost (specify rent or buy)

Some areas are getting more popular lately, so prices are going up around Logan Square for example. There is a huge movement of investors in real state that buy places to remodel them and rent them.
Prices vary from 400K to 650K for remodeled places.

I always rented though, and the prices I payed or my friends pay are:
- $700/month ($2100 total)for a 3 bedroom apartment in Lakeview
- $1000/month ($2000 total) for a 2 bedroom apartment in Lakeview
- $1200/month ($2400 total) for a 2 bedroom apartment downtown
- $1800/month for a 1 bedroom apartment rigth on Millenium Park (downtown)
- $600/month (1200 total) for a 2 bedroom apartment in Logan Square.

Indoor Hobbies


The food/drink scene is so diverse and huge in Chicago. You get so many bars and restaurants and most of them are so good.
There are so many sports you can do indoors (soccer, vball, basketball) I have played several leagues and there are so many courts around the city. They are expensive for my taste ($80-$120 per person)


Outdoor Hobbies

Chicago people hate the winter, so when there is a ray of sun, everyone is out.
You have trails for bikes and running almost everywhere.
The lake trails go all the way to Indiana around the lake.

There are sports events when the weather allows, so beaches are always full of people playing something or just relaxing.

There is some hiking around but nothing amazing. There are no mountains around so next best thing is 'Starved Rock' which is a one day hike thing to do.

Weather
I would say Chicago is great during summer but awful in winter.
They salt the roads all the time so your car will accumulate rust for sure. It might not be that snowy but its frigggggging cold.
But summer makes up for it most of the time. I would say Chicago is one of the best cities in the summer in the whole US.

Favorite things
I love to ride after work to the lake, bring a beer, play vball and swim. (so just summer lol)
Public transportation -> VERY VERY VERY good. some buses and trains run all night long.
Night life

Least favorite things

Cold cold and cold. Weather doesn't get better until almost May and it goes cold again before Thanksgiving.
During winter, solar hours are very low so you go to work and its dark and you leave work and its dark again...depressing.

'Must Try'
Field Museum.
Ride the lake shore on a bike.
Visit some tall buildings (Hancock tower > Sears Tower).
Food on patios and rooftops.
The river walk downtown.
U of Chicago campus.


Stupid ordinances/laws
They are super stupid with tickets on cars for parking, street cleaning and other stuff.
There is an increasing number of red light cameras and speed cameras.

Words of wisdom/Advice
Most areas is worth just renting. If you live a little bit further from the downtown or highly demanded areas, prices drop really fast.
CTA (public transport) works really well. Trains more than buses but overall I recommend living close to a red or blue line stop which run 24/7 and the blue one goes to the airport.
CTA tickets are $2.25 for the first ride. Then the second ride within 2 hours is $0.25 and the third ride withing 2 hours is free. Keep this in mind for quick errands.
The whole city is very flat so bikes are very common. Just be careful of stupid drivers and potholes.

If you have more specific questions, please dont hesitate to ask and I will gladly answer.

zoochadookdook

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #270 on: June 24, 2019, 10:34:54 AM »
Hi didn't see if there was a section about a request? I'm eying relocation to San Antonio TX for work this fall.

tyrannostache

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #271 on: June 27, 2019, 01:16:03 PM »
Can someone share info about Des Moines? I went to college in Iowa a loooong time ago, and I haven't been back since. I remember Des Moines as a stodgy old town. I'm looking at the potential of a move to the area for a MegaCorp job in Johnston. I have young kids, so I'm particularly interested in schools, kids activities, and the outdoors.


Bonus points if you can help me excise the Dar Williams song that has been rolling through my head ever since we started considering this move.


ChpBstrd

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #272 on: June 27, 2019, 02:56:26 PM »
For those who have moved recently, how accurate are the various cost of living comparison calculators? E.g.

https://www.bankrate.com/calculators/savings/moving-cost-of-living-calculator.aspx
https://www.bestplaces.net/cost-of-living/
https://www.nerdwallet.com/cost-of-living-calculator

Did your budget change by about the amount predicted?

mrigney

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #273 on: July 05, 2019, 10:22:48 PM »
Huntsville is in northern Alabama along the Tennessee River, situated about 80 miles north of Birmingham and 100 miles south of Nashville. It is the fastest growing large city in Alabama and is currently undergoing rapid development. Traditionally, Huntsville has been driven by the aerospace and defense industry (NASA, Army Materiel Command, Army Aviation & Missile Center). Recently, however, the variety of industry has expanded. Recent or current developments include the FBI moving 1,300 jobs here, a $1.6B Toyota-Mazda manufacturing plant, Blue Origin opening a production facility here, Facebook and Google Data center, a growing Biotech industry anchored by Hudson-Alpha institute. On top of the thousands of new jobs coming in, there is a huge amount of commercial development under way including Mid-city Huntsville, which is one of the top 5 largest commercial developments in the US (as of earlier this year). All this makes Huntsville a pretty dynamic place to live right now. Downtown is undergoing a massive transformation with numerous hotels, apartments, condos, and restaurants opening or under construction.

  • City, State, Country:REPLACE ME
    Huntsville, AL, USA
  • If a suburb, distance from city:
    Huntsville population: 197k, metro area ~450k. City proper will probably pass Birmingham as the biggest city in the state w/in the next 5 years (although Bham metro will still be significantly larger).
  • Average housing cost (specify rent or buy):
    Median Sales Price: $217k (this used to be significantly lower, but we're in the middle of a crazy market
  • Indoor Hobbies:
    Lots to do, although I can't say I take huge advantage of lots of it (I'm a simple guy with simple interests). Everyone has their own thing they like to do, so I doubt I can list all the indoor things to do, but I will say that interests are varied. We have everything from a great art museum downtown for a city our size to an active curling league. Minor league hockey (Go, Havoc!), a stellar symphony orchestra, chamber orchestra, US Space and Rocket Center, Space Camp (if you're a kid). Also tons (and growing) of restaurants, coffee shops, and one of the best beer/brewery scenes in the southeast US. Additionally, Lowe Mill is the largest privately owned arts center in the country. ~250 artists have studios at Lowe Mill, plus restaurants, choclatiers, and other shops. Lowe Mill also hosts numerous outdoor concerts throughout the year with up and coming artists.
  • Outdoor Hobbies:
    Huntsville is also a great place for outdoor activities most of the year. Huntsville Botanical Gardens is one of the premiere botanical gardens in the south (and I would argue in the country). I cannot say enough about how nice it is. For a family membership of $100, we get to enjoy the gardens year round. They recently had a Chinese Lantern exhibit that ran for several months that was absolutely stunning.

    Monte Sano State Park is adjacent to downtown and has great hiking/biking trails. Wheeler Wildlife Refuge runs along the TN River on the west side of the city and has some equally interesting trails that are of a completely different type. Ditto Landing is great to get out on the TN River. The Rocket City Trash Pandas (minor league baseball) start play next spring in a brand new stadium. Additionally, Huntsville is in the process of beginning construction on a brand new 8,500 seat amphitheater which should open up the concert scene a little more. There are various festivals throughout the year that are a lot of fun. Kite festival in the spring, a hot air balloon festival around Memorial Day. There are also numerous Farmer's Markets to serve the vibrant local food scene. Within an hours drive of town you can be at one of the great hikes in the southeast (Walls of Jericho) and many other hikes.

    Also, not sure how much of a thing this is other places, but there is a huge community pool presence. Many neighborhoods have community pools that memberships can be purchased for relatively cheaply that makes for a great summer gathering spot.
  • Weather (High Temps, Low Temps, Seasons, Sun):REPLACE ME
    Climate is continental. Hot summers, cool winters, generally pleasant and extended spring/fall. Average lo/hi in the dead of summer is 70/90. Dead of winter is 30/50. All in all, no weather tends to last two long. I would say that we generally have about 2 months of summer that are really not a lot of fun. (July/August). June and September can be pretty toasty, but can also have periods of very nice weather (e.g. this June we had a week where it was 60/80 all week). Winters are almost never terrible. It snows on average once a year, and ever 3-5 years we get a "big" snow (3-6"). We are generally wet (average about 56" of rain a year), but the rain comes in bursts, so that we generally have 8-10 days w/rain each month.
  • Favorite things:REPLACE ME
    Beer - 13 breweries and counting
    Campus 805
    Huntsville Botanical Gardens
    Honest Coffee
    Local library system
    Greenway system
  • Least favorite things:REPLACE ME
    Summer heat
    Ongoing road construction
    Urban sprawl (although this is getting better)
  • 'Must Try':
    Honest Coffee
    Alchemy Coffee
    Cotton Row (fine dining)
    Huntsville Botanical Garden
    Green Mountain Nature Preserve
    Hays Nature Preserve
    Lowe Mill
    A Farmer's Market
  • Stupid ordinances/laws:REPLACE ME
    Chicken coops have to be 150 ft away from all neighbors if you're in the city limits, which makes owning chickens in the city effectively impossible.
  • Words of wisdom/Advice:
    Huntsville is filled with a bunch of engineers, scientists, and other "creatives." It bucks most Alabama stereotypes, although you don't have to go far outside of the city to be back in rural Alabama. Lots (most?) folks in town are transplants and from all over the country (and world). Come if you like beer, a growing food scene, and low cost of living.
  • Sustainability options (gardening, solar, etc):
    We maintain a large garden in our yard. Plenty long growing season. Our lot isn't in a great set-up for solar, so not much knowledge on that.

penguintroopers

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #274 on: July 08, 2019, 09:06:58 AM »
For those who have moved recently, how accurate are the various cost of living comparison calculators? E.g.

https://www.bankrate.com/calculators/savings/moving-cost-of-living-calculator.aspx
https://www.bestplaces.net/cost-of-living/
https://www.nerdwallet.com/cost-of-living-calculator

Did your budget change by about the amount predicted?

Philly checking in. Not too bad, but I wanna know where they're buying gas and milk.

Edit: didn't realize you were asking for recent-movers, but as a roughly three year resident its pretty accurate as to what it costs around here.

Sun Hat

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #275 on: July 14, 2019, 08:38:03 AM »
Colorado Springs, CO

I make an effort to love everywhere I find myself, but it was so much easier here. The city itself is pretty large, with the natural growing pains that come with expansion. However, all expansion is moving east. To the west (a 20 minute bike ride from downtown), you have access to the foothills (and Pikes Peak). Throughout the city, there are a lot of bike trails, and they are very well maintained (as in some get plowed before the streets do). There is a plethora of fun free activities, and UppaDowna does weekly rides downtown. Weekly 5K fun runs are held almost year round. Bear Creek is a fun park, as is Fox Run (on the north side). COS is home to USA Triathlon, US Cycling, and USA Ultimate. Costs for housing vary within city limts. The North end of town is most expensive, and housing costs drop as you move south. I currently live just East of downtown, and the housing here is very cheap, since they are ranch style homes built in the 50s, and not McMansions that are in more demand these days. Colorado gets 300 days of sunlight, so our passive solar heat works quite well. I'm not familiar with many indoor activities here, but that's because there is a whole lot of outdoor activities and they are free. Hiking, bouldering, and biking are common hobbies, and they are all easily accessible (you can bike to a location for any of these). We also support dispersment camping in National Forests and BLM lands, so as long as you stay 100 feet (or something) away from rivers, you can just pitch a tent and enjoy. Even though it costs money, one of the most fun things that you have to try is outdoor laser tag at Battlefield Colorado, and the Starlight Spectacular is an awesome biking event where they close down the streets for a ride in the dark. The soil up north is more clay, so there will be some work getting a garden to grow. The soil seems to get better the further south you go. Throughought all of Colorado, there are strange laws regarding water usage and storage. It's technically illegal to collect rain water, but I haven't had an issue with it yet. Due to the proximity of the mountains, sunsets aren't anything all that great, but sunrises are cool. The views of the mountains are outstanding, and never cease to amaze me. There is a fair amount of sprawl, so be prepared to travel a bit if using an alternative mode of transportation. The libraries (21C) are great, and even have CNC machines and 3D printers that you can use (if you take a class and provide the materials). Overall, it's a great place to live, especially if you like outdoor activities. If you are a social butterfly, you can also find all kinds of groups to engage in activities with others (there is seriously a red wine and hiking group).

I lived in Colorado Springs from 2007-11 and can add a few points:
For indoor activities, I had season's tickets to the philharmonic for less than $10/ticket.
There's a beautiful reservoir that you can boat on and run/bike around just west of the city (sorry, I forget the name).
I second the shout out to the library system. It was really great.
Downtown has a reputation for being dangerous, but it's also vibrant and great for walking during the day, so is where I chose to live. It gets a bit sketchy between 2-3am when the bars let out, but I wasn't generally out and about then, and had no problems at all.
The only gardening that I did was a few pots on my balcony, but I think that if you were to try to grow vegetables that you might need to consider row covers or a greenhouse to keep the moisture in, as the air is extremely dry.
For the perfect day out, go to Kings Chef diner for breakfast, then head to Poor Richard's bookstore/cafe/toy shop/pizzaria.
For the occasional non-mustachian splurge, the Broadmoor Hotel did a lavish Sunday brunch that was really without equal.
A few hours away is Mesa Verde National Park, which is a must-visit experience.
Another favorite experience was making a weekend trip into the mountains to volunteer at the Leadville Trail 100 ultramarathon. It's a hoot to meet the crazies who voluntarily run 100 miles of high-altitude mountains. I did it every year and loved it.
I LOVED my years there because I embraced the outdoors lifestyle. I had colleagues who hated it, but they were neither active nor interested in exploring the culture.

stoaX

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #276 on: July 26, 2019, 02:26:52 PM »
Boise, ID

Average Housing cost (specify rent or buy):  I own in one of the subburbs of Boise, Eagle (15 miles from city center).  Eagle is one of the nicer areas.  It has a cute/historic downtown but most of the basic services you need.  There's lots of open property and housing starts at about $250k in Eagle for a 3 bedroom 2 bath.  Pricing might be a little less in Boise or Meridian, depending on the age of the house and condition.  Nampa isn't bad but Caldwell I would stay away from (this is where any gang activity takes place).  Most housing is new and the area is growing rapidly.

Hobbies:  Venture outdoors!  Skiing/snowboarding is 20 minutes from downtown Boise in the winter time, with larger mountains a couple of hours away.  Lines aren't horrible compared to skiing in California or other areas just because the population isn't that great.  Snowshowing and alpine skiing are also popular.  In the summertime, fly fishing and camping are very popular.  McCall is a popular destination location and it's a 2 hour drive from Boise.  There are lake activities there, as well as a few small shops, biking, etc.  Another popular destination is Red Fish lake, but it's a few hours drive.  I like being able to drive 20 minutes in any direction and being in the middle of farmland.  When you camp, look at the stars (you can actually see them)!

Weather:  Usually there are 2-3 weeks of temperatures in the low hundreds, but it's a dry heat.  Most days of the summers are in the mid to upper 90's.  The coldest months are December and January.  Most years have a couple of days that fall to single digits for the low.  Snow (most years) is not a problem.  A big snow storm is 3" and the major roads are well taken care of.  People put on snow tires, but I've only had a problem once in my FWD econobox, when there was 14 inches of snow on the ground (big snow year).  If you garden, planting times are usually early May and the first frost is right around October 1.  January brings about an inversion - clouds settling into the Boise area.  No rain, no snow, just dreariness.  If you drive up to higher elevations, the sun breaks through the clouds and it's sunny.

Favorite things:  Boise has an amazing farmers market.  It's up to 4 city blocks now, and you can find fresh produce as well as crafts.  I like how walkable/bikable Boise and the surrounding area is.  There's a ~20 mile long greenbelt (paved bike trail) that crosses the city that lots of folks utilize.  World-class whitewater rafting happens near Boise.  I feel very safe wherever I go, and whatever I do.  Boise also has a number of semi-professional sports teams that are worth attending.

Least Favorite things:  The state is very red historically, but as more people move from CA, WA and OR into ID, this is beginning to change.  As a result, people are very proud of their guns and hunting here is a constitutional right, but gender equality is not.  In general, people are very nice.  Often times people will hold up traffic to let you out of a driveway.  Ethnic food options are limited.

Words of Wisdom/Advice:  Have a job setup before you move here, if you require one.  Even though Boise is growing, it's still not a metropolis and options can be limited compared to larger cities.  I've lived here ~10 years and worked in the tech community.  Everyone in that community knows me and I know most people.

Know your commute.  Traffic isn't bad, but it pays to know the flow of traffic.  A 15 minute commute with no traffic can easily turn into a 40 minute commute with traffic.  Avoid your commute being on Eagle Road, if you can.

Sustainability Options:  The Idaho government doesn't subsidize green energy.  Some local utilities are talking about not having to buy homeowner-produced solar energy.  A majority of power in the Boise area is produced by coal and hydro.  Idaho Power is resistant to change.

Belated thanks for this...Idaho is on my list of places I want to investigate moving to.  Anything you would add, delete or change to your review above?

aspiringnomad

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #277 on: August 04, 2019, 09:39:44 PM »
  • City, State, Country: Washington, DC, USA
  • If a suburb, distance from city: I've lived in three locations within the city's most central ward, which is a 10-20 minute bike ride from the downtown/CBD area depending on where you are within the ward and where you're going downtown.
  • Average housing cost (specify rent or buy): 1BR rentals start at $1.7k/month but are more like $2.3-2.7k/month if you don't want to be in a basement. To purchase, 1BRs start at ~400k and go up from there. Multiply by ~1.5 for each additional bedroom.
  • Indoor Hobbies: Museums, indoor sports, movies, house parties, restaurant/bars
  • Outdoor Hobbies: Parks, bike rides, outdoor sports, roof decks, restaurant/bar patios and beer gardens
  • Weather (High Temps, Low Temps, Seasons, Sun): Very hot (95 degrees F and humid) for 4-6 weeks in the summer, very cold (as low as 15 degrees F) during the winter though often sunny and infrequently snowy. Spring and Fall are sometimes gorgeous, though can also be humid.
  • Favorite things: The diversity of people, things to do, the walkability/bikeability, general youthfulness of people living here, and the overall quality of life (income versus non-real estate expenses). To elaborate on the people, I've been pretty lucky to fall into a friend group mixed with blue collar folks and international people here for the experience as much as work. Very few of my acquaintances work directly in politics. No one is boring and no one cares what you do for a living. As legend has it, this is pretty atypical in DC, but in my experience, I get the "So, what do you do?" question way more often when visiting other cities than I do here.
  • Least favorite things: Crime, national and local politics, weather extremes
  • 'Must Try': Live close-in and don't deal at all with the area's notoriously awful traffic and unreliable Metro. If it's your first time visiting, obviously, check out the Mall, Smithsonian, etc.
  • Stupid ordinances/laws: During the past 15-20 years, the city council has generally been smart about growing the tax base while using the surplus to provide additional safety nets. However, the safety net policies have not entirely yielded the desired results. Keeping someone in the city on subsistence-level support while the cost of living skyrockets around them is not a recipe for success or happiness. Over time, it's all caused lots of angst about gentrification despite the fact that the city spends more than just about any other on education and social services on a per capita basis.
  • Words of wisdom/Advice: Live in a group house if you move here while you're young. You'll save boatloads of money and hopefully meet interesting people that might just become your best friends.
  • Sustainability options (gardening, solar, etc): You can find community gardens and solar roofs all over the place and I think both are subsidized.

edgeofjupiter

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #278 on: August 24, 2019, 05:01:18 PM »
City, State: San Francisco, CA, USA

If a suburb, distance from city: I lived in the Bay Area for 20 years, and in SF for the last 4. I lived in Bernal Heights and I bought a house in the Outer Sunset. I moved away three years ago.

Average housing cost: Average rent: $3700. For that amount I don't think you'll get anything bigger than a one bedroom apartment. Median house price as of 2019: $1.7 million.

True story: in 2015 I looked at a house in Noe Valley (very desirable neighborhood) that could have been a set of a horror film. It was literally unfit for humans to live in. It sold for $1.5 million.

Indoor Hobbies: Music, foodie scene, museums, drinking/nightlife.

Outdoor Hobbies: Windsurfing, sailing, hiking, biking, running... you name it. If you like snow sports, Tahoe is about a four hour drive (given favorable traffic).

Weather: Fairly uniform all year round. The locals all know a Mark Twain quote: "The coldest winter I ever spent was summer in San Francisco." It is chilly enough at night that you will rarely go outside at any time of year without a jacket. Winter is rainier and a bit darker. Otherwise it can be difficult to distinguish seasons.

Favorite things: Good food. SF is a beautiful place, once you look past the urban decay. I would never get tired of looking at the Golden Gate Bridge. Proximity to places like Tahoe and Sonoma County.

Least favorite things: Where to start? Property crime is essentially legalized. If you are unlucky enough to have your car broken into (which is pretty much guaranteed if you are foolish enough to leave a laptop in plain view), the police will not help you. The stories you've read about human feces in the streets is true- and this goes for the more expensive, "nice" neighborhoods. You get to experience all this while paying exorbitantly high taxes (state, sales, and property).

'Must Try': Mission burritos. Muir Woods. Walk across the Golden Gate Bridge. If you're lucky enough to have a friend with a sailboat, don't pass up sailing in the Bay.

Stupid ordinances/laws: This place has the worst politicians, and they love stupid laws. Plastic straws are banned, but garbage is piled up everywhere. I once received a threatening letter from the city because I put too much paper in our recycling bin and the lid wouldn't close all the way. The NIMBYism is terrible- it's practically impossible to build anything new as the project will be scrapped if the neighbors complain.

Words of wisdom/Advice: Pretty simple- don't move there. Maybe if you're young, single, and have decent employment prospects, but even then you should look elsewhere. More dogs live in SF than children- this is literally a city without a future. It is not a place for normal people who are not billionaires or addicts living on the street. This is a huge problem as people you want as your neighbors (teachers, baristas, firefighters, cops, nurses) can't afford to live there.

Sustainability options (gardening, solar, etc): Solar panels might be an option for you. It's unlikely you'll get a large enough patch of land to make gardening worth your while (if you want to save money as opposed to gardening because you like gardening). Watch out for droughts as you will be encouraged to save water.

FIREmesoIcanFIRE

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #279 on: October 26, 2019, 08:35:25 PM »
Request for Frankfurt, Germany

smoghat

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #280 on: November 26, 2019, 06:42:35 PM »
How about some small towns in New England (Vermont!)? Or Portland, Maine.

MotoMM

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #281 on: January 05, 2020, 06:43:39 AM »
@hoping2retire35 re: Charleston and solar

We are in Mt Pleasant and had solar panels installed in 2017. 30% federal tax credit and 25% SC state tax credit, one of the best in the country. Pretty sure the credits were still in place in 2019 - not sure about 2020.
Most of what you posted is pretty accurate. I'd add that this area is very NOT bike friendly. Maybe downtown Charleston, I don't know, but certainly not the surrounding areas.
Nice place though if you like the beach or fishing or boating or other water activities. Folly Beach has decent surf (including lessons and contests), and people also surf IOP.

Droog

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #282 on: January 24, 2020, 10:09:03 AM »
Currently live in Bend, OR.  Since this post was originally made, Bend has gotten even more crowded and home prices have gone up a bit. But I love my home state to death and having lived in Eugene, Hillsboro and now Bend am happy to help answer any questions about these areas as well!

I would love to hear about Hillsboro, OR as I have a job relocation opportunity there. Thanks!

Dee18

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #283 on: January 24, 2020, 05:18:27 PM »
+1 for Huntsville
If you are driving on I-65 in December or January be sure to check out Wheeler National Wildlife refuge.  There is an enclosed viewing building for birding right on the water (even heated)  where you can see thousands of Sandhill cranes, a few whooping cranes, and many species of ducks.  The entrance is only about 5 minutes off the interstate and it is truly an amazing place.

fuzzy math

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #284 on: January 25, 2020, 09:54:09 AM »
Currently live in Bend, OR.  Since this post was originally made, Bend has gotten even more crowded and home prices have gone up a bit. But I love my home state to death and having lived in Eugene, Hillsboro and now Bend am happy to help answer any questions about these areas as well!

I would love to hear about Hillsboro, OR as I have a job relocation opportunity there. Thanks!

Intel?

I lived on the edge of Beaverton / Hillsboro. Cost of living is high. Probably $450+k for a home on a 4000sf lot. You will be packed in like sardines. I would suggest living off city streets for your commute. The 26 freeway is super backed up and inaccessible from 6 - 10 am and 2 - 7 pm. That's the only way to get into Portland proper. Every freeway is bound by bridges, mountains, or water so there aren't opportunities to build more roads. There is light rail but from where you'd be its 30+ mins into Portland and sometimes its so crowded you can't get on. Portland itself is great but the majority of the city will be 45+ mins for where you want to go. I found myself just staying at home a lot of the time. Concerts, food, culture is all great. TONS of homeless people. I left 3 yrs ago and it was not safe for women to be on some of the biking trails due to the tent cities. Some of that may have changed, but Portland is a destination for homeless people because its hip and the weather is mild.
I was not particularly thrilled with Beaverton schools. Historically the area was where people who couldn't afford to live closer to the city lived so you may find lots of lower income people. Lots of temp HB visa workers at Intel and Nike so there's a huge south asian population who are all very insular because they are only in town for a number of months.

Tris Prior

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #285 on: February 26, 2020, 10:18:52 AM »
New Orleans, LA

Coming soon...I just hate dead links.

It doesn't look like this ever got reviewed and I'd be interested!

SimpleCycle

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Re: Mustachian Relocation Guide
« Reply #286 on: February 26, 2020, 12:45:42 PM »
I would love to have Merida, MEX added. Also love to hear about any places in MEX. Seriously considering relocating there post FIRE.

I too am Merida curious.  Hopefully we'll be spending extended time there in the next couple years, so I'll report back.