Author Topic: Job offer vs. Reality  (Read 3522 times)

Stachetastic

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 729
Job offer vs. Reality
« on: January 16, 2015, 09:50:44 AM »
I started a new job last Fall, and so far it's going well. However, when I was offered this position, my supervisor stated I could work remotely (from home, Panera, wherever). As long as my work was done, they didn't care where I was. It was even stated that I could work completely remotely if I had a scanner, but they could not require me to purchase one. Well, fast forward a few months and I've not worked from home once. I am between 3 different offices, so I am "out and about" but there is a lot more driving that I hadn't planned on, and most of it is not reimbursed. Should I say something now? When I'm done with probation in a month or so?

neo von retorch

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3310
  • Location: SE PA
    • Fi@retorch - personal finance tracking
Re: Job offer vs. Reality
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2015, 10:04:01 AM »
Is your remote work or obligation to drive in your offer letter or handbook policies?

Stachetastic

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 729
Re: Job offer vs. Reality
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2015, 10:54:08 AM »
Is your remote work or obligation to drive in your offer letter or handbook policies?

I never received an offer letter. The employee handbook is very general and dated, and does not address working remotely. In addition, my position is one of two that are contract positions. So while we get the same benefits as the other employees (PTO, holidays, etc), our job duties are vastly different. For example, we are the only two employees who visit other offices.

DoubleDown

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1989
Re: Job offer vs. Reality
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2015, 12:08:58 PM »
Without knowing all the dynamics of your position and the culture, my general thinking would be as follows:

1. Wait until after probation is completed since it's so near anyhow.

2. After successfully passing the probationary period, come up with an actual figure of what it is costing you to drive around. The IRS uses a figure of about $0.57/mile if that helps.

3. Determine if it's worth it to bring it up compared to your salary and benefits. And this will depend on the culture of the company, your boss, past precedent (if any), and lots of other factors. For example (using big numbers for added effect), if you earn $200k/year and it's costing you $200/month to drive around, and you expect your boss would view bringing it up as a cheapskate/ungrateful mindset, then I'd leave it alone as the cost of doing business. On the other hand, if driving around is eating up 10% of your take-home pay it probably makes sense to bring it up.

4. If you do bring it up, frame it with actual numbers so your employer understands the real impact instead of vague ideas of "I drive around a lot," and ask for suggestions rather than presupposing a solution. For example, besides working from home, solutions could include reimbursing you directly for costs, providing you with a company car, etc.

5. Finally, you might bring up working from home even if the costs of driving around aren't high, but be prepared to explain how you can still easily accomplish the mission without driving to these sites. Be honest with yourself here to make sure you really can do it.

countdown

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 67
Re: Job offer vs. Reality
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2015, 02:18:17 PM »
Are you in training? Is there some logistical reason you need to be in the office or are you being scheduled to go here go there to meet with certain people ftf? If there's an onboarding reason for you to be onsite  suck it up for a bit. If not, I'd just plan a day or two to wfh, notify your super by email that you'll be working from home on those dates and wait for the response. It might just need to be initiated by you. In case of questions, be prepared with what work you'll be doing and how you'll be able to respond to coworkers and/or supervisor requests while out of office. Good luck!

shotgunwilly

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 547
Re: Job offer vs. Reality
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2015, 02:25:38 PM »
I never received an offer letter. The employee handbook is very general and dated, and does not address working remotely. In addition, my position is one of two that are contract positions. So while we get the same benefits as the other employees (PTO, holidays, etc), our job duties are vastly different. For example, we are the only two employees who visit other offices.

Wait... so you got a contract position and never had a written offer or scope of work???

Stachetastic

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 729
Re: Job offer vs. Reality
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2015, 06:50:39 PM »


Wait... so you got a contract position and never had a written offer or scope of work???
[/quote]

Well, I'm an actual full time employee with the same hours, benefits, etc as everyone else, but my employer has contracted with the government to provide my position. I hope that makes sense.

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8428
  • Registered member
Re: Job offer vs. Reality
« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2015, 11:28:43 AM »


Wait... so you got a contract position and never had a written offer or scope of work???

Well, I'm an actual full time employee with the same hours, benefits, etc as everyone else, but my employer has contracted with the government to provide my position. I hope that makes sense.
[/quote]

OK, I was gonna say you could write off the miles.  Actually, you may be able to write off the miles anyways as a non-reimbursed business expense.  Don't know tax laws well enough to say for sure but look into it.