Author Topic: is an electric toothbrush a good choice when the teeth are not so health?  (Read 559 times)

Soasheal

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Can anybody tell me if it is good to use an electric toothbrush daily when my teeth are decaying? The toothache had tortured me for several weeks until I take some medicine from my dentist.  I am considering buy a new toothbrush. Or should I learn to use dental floss and get used to the flavor of mouthwash ?

Any ideas to share?

Khaetra

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If you're teeth are already bad I would suggest you and your dentist come up with a plan to either try to save what teeth you have or look into dentures.  Electric toothbrushes aren't worth the money and if used improperly can do some serious damage.

GizmoTX

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The Sonicare electric toothbrush has improved our dental health & reduced my need for cleanings from quarterly to twice a year. A manual toothbrush allows my teeth to accumulate plaque much faster. You should be replacing your toothbrush or toothbrush head every six months or when it shows considerable wear, whichever comes sooner. And floss.

However, a toothbrush wonít fix a cavity or gum loss ó get all issues fixed, not just pain killers. Itís money well spent for your health, well being, & appearance.

2Cent

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No problem. They are also quite cheap nowadays. You don't need any of the special options like different speeds.
Just buy the soft brushes and don't press too hard. Basically you can do as much damage with a manual brush. It's the pressure you put, not the vibration. I also have a sonicare (the cheapest) and it is softer than when I brush manually. Also the timer helps not to over brush an area which should actually help. If you already have a toothache, and it hurts to touch you won't want to use an electric brush. You want to visit a dentist and fix it. If it costs a lot, do it abroad. A cheap ticket and hotel stay can save you a lot if much work needs to be done. And poor countries often have really great cheap dental facilities for the rich who can afford it.

Dave1442397

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I still use an old-fashioned toothbrush, but I'd ask your dentist and go with whatever they say.

As for vacation dentistry, I should look into that. I've spent $4,001 at the dentist this year, with at least another $700 to go. It feels like having car payments again :(

KaizenSoze

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Or should I learn to use dental floss and get used to the flavor of mouthwash ?

Get an electrical toothbrush. The timer option on most models will make sure you spend enough time on different parts of your mouth.

As someone who sucks at using dental floss. I would suggest using dental picks if you have trouble with floss.

SilveradoBojangles

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I have a history of cavities as a child, and a mouth full of fillings to prove it. Even though I take excellent care of my teeth now, I know that the existing fillings will fail over time, and that will lead to more and more expensive dental work. It sucks, but all I can do is try and keep my teeth as clean as possible to slow the decay process. So yes, the electric toothbrush is worth it (they last a long time, too. I've had mine for about 8 years). Ever since I started using it the dental assistants remark about how clean my teeth are. I have not gotten a new cavity. I also floss (set your self a floss timer each night to form the habit. Also, explore a few different kinds of floss to see what you like. Those floss pick things make it very easy). At my last cleaning the dentist recommended mouthwash to keep deep gum bacteria in check (it can cause bone loss, which leads to teeth falling out).

You only get one set of teeth. In light of that a $100 tooth brush seems worth it.

slappy

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I have a history of cavities as a child, and a mouth full of fillings to prove it. Even though I take excellent care of my teeth now, I know that the existing fillings will fail over time, and that will lead to more and more expensive dental work. It sucks, but all I can do is try and keep my teeth as clean as possible to slow the decay process. So yes, the electric toothbrush is worth it (they last a long time, too. I've had mine for about 8 years). Ever since I started using it the dental assistants remark about how clean my teeth are. I have not gotten a new cavity. I also floss (set your self a floss timer each night to form the habit. Also, explore a few different kinds of floss to see what you like. Those floss pick things make it very easy). At my last cleaning the dentist recommended mouthwash to keep deep gum bacteria in check (it can cause bone loss, which leads to teeth falling out).

You only get one set of teeth. In light of that a $100 tooth brush seems worth it.

I got my sonicare on amazon for $20.

2Cent

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I have a history of cavities as a child, and a mouth full of fillings to prove it. Even though I take excellent care of my teeth now, I know that the existing fillings will fail over time, and that will lead to more and more expensive dental work. It sucks, but all I can do is try and keep my teeth as clean as possible to slow the decay process. So yes, the electric toothbrush is worth it (they last a long time, too. I've had mine for about 8 years). Ever since I started using it the dental assistants remark about how clean my teeth are. I have not gotten a new cavity. I also floss (set your self a floss timer each night to form the habit. Also, explore a few different kinds of floss to see what you like. Those floss pick things make it very easy). At my last cleaning the dentist recommended mouthwash to keep deep gum bacteria in check (it can cause bone loss, which leads to teeth falling out).

You only get one set of teeth. In light of that a $100 tooth brush seems worth it.

I got my sonicare on amazon for $20.
There are quite a few different models.
This is an excellent overview of the differences:
https://www.animated-teeth.com/electric_toothbrushes/b-best-sonicare-toothbrush.htm

frugaliknowit

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The problems you are having are from a lack of flossing and or lack of/improper brushing.  A sonic toothbrush (by itself) is not going to solve your problem.

Laura33

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1.  Get your painful tooth seen to by a dentist.  All the brushing and flossing and mouthwashes in the world won't fix that.

2.  Flossing is absolutely critical.  If you are like me and can't stand it, try those Proxabrush or Gum brushes that slide between your teeth -- these can do a really good job of removing food particles at the gumline that can lead to inflammation, cavities, and gum disease.  Just be aware that they don't clean out spaces near the tops of the teeth (I just had two cavities filled between the tops of my teeth despite regular brushing and proxabrushes, so I have had to suck it up and learn to deal with regular flossing).

3.  I have problem teeth.  Every dentist I have had in the last decade told me to switch to Sonicaire -- apparently, I was brushing TOO hard with a regular (soft) brush, and that was causing my gums to recede.  I finally did it, and it has helped quite a bit with both getting my teeth clean and in stopping my receding gums.  For my bad teeth/gums, it was worth it.

4.  I also like the mouth rinses.  Most people probably don't need them.  But if you have bad teeth, it's a little extra protection after brushing and flossing. 
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Wayward

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The mouth is a great indicator of overall health and I definitely recommend making a plan with your dentist to fix the underlying cause of the decay immediately. Not just painkillers!!  From my personal experience, I was diagnosed with the start of gum disease, which required a Periodontal "deep" cleaning and maintenance visits to make sure the condition was improving.  After the cleaning the dentist recommended an electric toothbrush*; my teeth feel cleaner and healthier than ever before and I made a habit of flossing and using a good mouthwash daily**.  My advice would be to check with your dentist and start using an electric toothbrush if he/she clears it.

*Costco had a sale on a 2-pack of Oral B basic electric toothbrushes for $65. Best. Investment. Ever.
**Essential Oxygen brushing rinse, it has hydrogen peroxide to kill bacteria, and is by far the best mouthwash I've ever used. (I brush with the electric toothbrush first, floss, then use a regular toothbrush with the rinse)

Hope this help, all the best :)
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lbmustache

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Definitely YES to an electric toothbrush!

Also YES to flossing! The brush cannot get stuff in-between your teeth.

If you have the means, a WaterPik is great but not necessary (probably leaning towards the anti-Mustachian end).

Oral health is so important. Better to spend a little more upfront rather than risk thousands in dental bills (and pain) later on. My dad took horrible care of his teeth and has had many issues and has had to spend thousands of dollars.