Author Topic: Help me brainstorm job opportunities? Tell me about careers I've never heard of!  (Read 9159 times)

lifejoy

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I have a bachelor's degree in English Literature (= good communication skills, good critical thinking) and a master's degree in Library and Information Systems (= good organization, good research skills, experience teaching). I also have tons of experience in customer service, sales, and a bit of experience supervising/managing. I'm tech savvy but not a programmer.

I am moving to a new city, and I'm very excited! I'm looking for a new job and trying to find one that will pay me lots of money so that I can reach FIRE status ASAP. I've been looking for library and office jobs, but I feel like I need to branch out and think of some new fields/positions. Any ideas? I would really appreciate it! I'm willing to try just about anything as long as I feel qualified.

Edited to add: Any jobs that require face-to-face human interaction would be my preference. I despise working on a computer facing data all day, but beggars can't be choosers!
« Last Edit: May 20, 2015, 01:08:23 PM by lifejoy »

swick

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Have you looked into offering copywriting services? You can do it pretty much anywhere but being in a city with lots of companies help. Someone has to create all those training manuals, industry whitepapers and year end reports/newsletters.

With your experience and background you could probably do really well - if you have the freelance spirit. Could be a nice side-gig at the very least.

lifejoy

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Have you looked into offering copywriting services? You can do it pretty much anywhere but being in a city with lots of companies help. Someone has to create all those training manuals, industry whitepapers and year end reports/newsletters.

With your experience and background you could probably do really well - if you have the freelance spirit. Could be a nice side-gig at the very least.

This is the perfect example of a career I had never considered. Thank you so much for taking the time to respond and for planting this seed!

swick

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Anytime :) Another one, I know I have posted quite a bit before is freelance grant writing/ non profit fundraising. You'd probably do very well there too - Again a job you can do from home and take with you anywhere!

Beaker

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You might also consider technical writing. Similar to copy writing, but maybe a little bit more niche.

RelaxedGal

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I work in Information Technology, so my first thought was Project Management

Definitely a good skills match for you, and pays well in my opinion.  Average $75,000/year according to salary.com for Vancouver BC, for the 2-4 years experience level.  $95K average at 4-7 years experience.  Eventually you'd want PMP certification.

Cromacster

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Lots of larger companies have libraries and librarians that are focused on their specific industry.  My company's library mostly consists of technical papers, journals, databases, and company history.  We also have people on staff whose sole job is searching and reviewing patents.  They are not lawyers or paralegals, they are a part of our library department.  Although, I have a feeling you are aware of these.

A more out there prospect would be looking to smaller startup type companies in the medical device industry (this may or may not be available where you are).  Records management is an important part in the medical device world and most small companies lack in it...hell even large companies are bad with it.  You might be able to consult for several companies if you become aware of the requirements and regulations.  This type of position could be available in any highly regulated industry.

lifejoy

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I work in Information Technology, so my first thought was Project Management

Definitely a good skills match for you, and pays well in my opinion.  Average $75,000/year according to salary.com for Vancouver BC, for the 2-4 years experience level.  $95K average at 4-7 years experience.  Eventually you'd want PMP certification.

Hmm. I'll definitely look into this. I thought that project management jobs were only open to people that already held PMP certification. Thanks for the idea!

lifejoy

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You might also consider technical writing. Similar to copy writing, but maybe a little bit more niche.

Great lead, thanks!

lifejoy

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Lots of larger companies have libraries and librarians that are focused on their specific industry.  My company's library mostly consists of technical papers, journals, databases, and company history.  We also have people on staff whose sole job is searching and reviewing patents.  They are not lawyers or paralegals, they are a part of our library department.  Although, I have a feeling you are aware of these.

A more out there prospect would be looking to smaller startup type companies in the medical device industry (this may or may not be available where you are).  Records management is an important part in the medical device world and most small companies lack in it...hell even large companies are bad with it.  You might be able to consult for several companies if you become aware of the requirements and regulations.  This type of position could be available in any highly regulated industry.

You're right, I am aware of more "special libraries" situations, but I hadn't thought about doing record management consulting. To be honest, the world of consulting kind of intimidates me... it's a great big unknown. But worth looking into.

MsSindy

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I work in Information Technology, so my first thought was Project Management

Definitely a good skills match for you, and pays well in my opinion.  Average $75,000/year according to salary.com for Vancouver BC, for the 2-4 years experience level.  $95K average at 4-7 years experience.  Eventually you'd want PMP certification.

Hmm. I'll definitely look into this. I thought that project management jobs were only open to people that already held PMP certification. Thanks for the idea!

Another area along the same lines is to start as a Business Analyst - that is someone who works between the Business folks and the Technical folks to understand and implement the requirements of a project - they often have to interpret 'techie' speak to the business folks.  They work closely with the PM.  Again, a cert is helpful, but definitely not required.  Also, look at Change Management roles - they need very good communication and people skills.  Anyone of these roles can be on a non-technical project, so don't just think IT.  I do PM work, but I manage the business side of the project and let a Tech PM handle the techie stuff.

NorCal

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Sales gets an unnecessary bad rap.  It's a well compensated (if you're good at it) people-related job.  Work-life balance will depend on the employer.

I'm not talking about used-car sales or anything.  Think business-to-business software or marketing service sales. 

Franklin

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You might also consider technical writing. Similar to copy writing, but maybe a little bit more niche.

Great lead, thanks!

I'm a CIO/CTO and I have a ghost writer.  Pretty much everything that comes out of my office for internal or external consumption comes from her.  My thoughts, her words:)  Good luck!

cautiouspessimist

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Free lance editor. There are many ways to go about it. You could reach out to a publishing company of some sort, or you could work with a translation company. There are a number of them that are decentralized that would basically email you translations to edit. There are challenges there (sometimes it helps being familiar with the source language because you can figure out what they mean a little easier), but any educated native-level English speaker can edit at a pretty good pace. Especially with an English degree (good for something after all, I suppose).

Alternatively, there's also translation management. Basically, you would be responsible for assigning documents to translators, getting them done on time, and probably also still some editing responsibilities. There aren't as many decentralized possibilities for this, but there are translation companies in a lot of places.

lifejoy

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Sales gets an unnecessary bad rap.  It's a well compensated (if you're good at it) people-related job.  Work-life balance will depend on the employer.

I'm not talking about used-car sales or anything.  Think business-to-business software or marketing service sales.

I love sales. I'm currently working at a high-end jewellery store and loving it. But trying to find a job that would use my degrees a little more.

NorCal

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Sales gets an unnecessary bad rap.  It's a well compensated (if you're good at it) people-related job.  Work-life balance will depend on the employer.

I'm not talking about used-car sales or anything.  Think business-to-business software or marketing service sales.

I love sales. I'm currently working at a high-end jewellery store and loving it. But trying to find a job that would use my degrees a little more.

While it's hard to give advice without knowing you personally, I would say stick with sales if you truly enjoy it.  Just find a product or sales cycle that's more interesting to you.  If you sell technical products, you'll have to learn the product and be able to use them.  You won't need to become a programmer, but you'll have to get general technical knowledge.  I've worked for a few software companies, and the sales folks always seemed to have fun, and they were able to use a variety of skills.

One related option is Sales Support.  Every big sales team needs someone to manage their SalesForce numbers, write RFP's, and do technical demonstrations.  This is a bit more of a desk job, but it could be a good hybrid for you.

sisto

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I saw some of the ideas I had already posted by others. One more that comes to mind that I don't think was posted is a project analyst. That's another job that might interact with a PM. You have the necessary skills and it should also pay pretty well too.

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lifejoy

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lifejoy

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On a related note, can anyone help me find that old thread that was about people's favourite summer jobs?

Le Poisson

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How quickly do you want to step into this new career and are you willing to invest and time into training? Also, by face to face do you mean actual face time, or does appeasing people who want to lynch you over the phone sound appealing to you?

I work in traffic which has a nice blend of professional sit-down and plan a community meetings and call-in's from angry residents and let's put on a parade meetings and construction is behind so we better get the road opened meetings, along with technical computer work and non-technical work. Until self-driving cars are commonplace there is good job security, and not a lot of competition.

BUT - you would have to take some schooling to get into the field. Since you already have an unrelated degree you could fast-track, but it wouldbe a couple years at least via Mohawk College (in Hamilton, ON).

As for work - anyplace there's cars they need us, and pay nicely. And there is a lot of demand. Case in point one industry job board of many... http://www.cite7.org/employment_opportunities/


Axecleaver

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Lifejoy, here's the summer jobs thread: http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/what's-the-best-job-you-ever-had/msg591872

I'm a recovering English major, too. I second the Business Analyst recommendation. Regarding project management: The PMP cert is pretty popular in IT today, but it's not required for most PM roles. It can be a very stressful job, though, and frequently requires extensive travel. YMMV.

vagon

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IT Service Management, starting as a config librarian.

Configuration librarian is someone who catalogues and keeps up to date asset information about IT systems in something called the CMDB.
You can get ITIL foundations certification in < 3 days and position yourself well for an entry level role.

Pros:
Suites your existing librarian skills
This could then easily branch out into any of the areas of ITIL.
Pay scales well as you branch out or move into management

Cons:
Mostly computer based

lifejoy

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How quickly do you want to step into this new career and are you willing to invest and time into training? Also, by face to face do you mean actual face time, or does appeasing people who want to lynch you over the phone sound appealing to you?

I work in traffic which has a nice blend of professional sit-down and plan a community meetings and call-in's from angry residents and let's put on a parade meetings and construction is behind so we better get the road opened meetings, along with technical computer work and non-technical work. Until self-driving cars are commonplace there is good job security, and not a lot of competition.

BUT - you would have to take some schooling to get into the field. Since you already have an unrelated degree you could fast-track, but it wouldbe a couple years at least via Mohawk College (in Hamilton, ON).

As for work - anyplace there's cars they need us, and pay nicely. And there is a lot of demand. Case in point one industry job board of many... http://www.cite7.org/employment_opportunities/

I think at this point, additional training/education would be too costly opportunity-cost-wise for it to be worthwhile. My earning potential is good enough that I would probably only consider an online course paid for by a future employer :) I do, however, appreciate the suggestion and I will keep it in mind.

...and it definitely qualifies as a job I hadn't heard of! :)

lifejoy

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Lifejoy, here's the summer jobs thread: http://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/what's-the-best-job-you-ever-had/msg591872

I'm a recovering English major, too. I second the Business Analyst recommendation. Regarding project management: The PMP cert is pretty popular in IT today, but it's not required for most PM roles. It can be a very stressful job, though, and frequently requires extensive travel. YMMV.

Sweet, thanks for the link! I know that thread could hold some interesting ideas for me :)

Lol @ recovering english major! Ahh what a great degree. And being able to communicate effectively is such an asset, to any career path. However... It is broad.

I hate travel and telling people what to do. Sadly, I think PM might not be what I want to do... But maybe I could work up to it.

lifejoy

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IT Service Management, starting as a config librarian.

Configuration librarian is someone who catalogues and keeps up to date asset information about IT systems in something called the CMDB.
You can get ITIL foundations certification in < 3 days and position yourself well for an entry level role.

Pros:
Suites your existing librarian skills
This could then easily branch out into any of the areas of ITIL.
Pay scales well as you branch out or move into management

Cons:
Mostly computer based

I would take a major pay cut to be able to step away from a computer.

However, that mindset seems to only last me around six months before I get desperate for more monies! Thanks for the idea, I definitely hadn't heard of that one :)

cynthia1848

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If you really like sales, I would see if you can get an introduction to a high end life insurance salesperson.  People who sell life insurance for giant amounts get a commission - for example the commission on a $10M policy could be $300K. 

Pooja Sharma

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Have you ever heard of jobs like Professional Wearer of T-Shirts, Video Game Tester, Professional Traveler, Waterslide Tester? These are some of the coolest job profiles you might would have never heard of. More details here: http://www.buzzfeed.com/mtv2/11-jobs-that-are-too-good-to-be-true#.qlPYDm4O8

cerebus

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I'm an English major who works as a technical writer currently. The librarian qualification adds another quite viable dimension that I was involved in recently, which is information architecture.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information_architecture

It is basically libriaranship of large information systems. I was employed at a national university, and we had the management of the very complex website's information, with all the various faculties having their own sections of the site, and issues around archival of important research and so forth. Librarians tend to fit naturally into that type of work, and in fact I worked closely with the actual librarians on some projects involving metadata archival storage. The role also has a strong technical writing component and they tend to fit together quite naturally. There was also form creation, which is another aspect to information design and management. (It's very similar to what vagon suggested).

Gimesalot

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All of the refineries I have worked at have librarians that catalog and organize all the paper documents and their electronic versions.  Most refineries will have at least one, if not two people doing this full time.  The upside is that they pay well and you would have amazing benefits most likely including a pension.