Author Topic: Growing a mustache...with a disability  (Read 1771 times)

Writer_Girl

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Growing a mustache...with a disability
« on: July 11, 2018, 02:48:38 AM »
Hello!

Lovely to meet you all.  Iím pretty new here.  And basically, I want to retire early. I do okay for myself, and the idea of retiring early didnít really occur to me until I was diagnosed with a progressive ilness.  Iím okay now except when Iím relapsing, and Iíll likely have the retire early.  And hereís the thing:
 This illness made me realize I WANT TO.  Actually...it sounds fun, illness or no.

Letís get one thing out of the way:  thereís no cure.  Okay?  Okay. I basically made my peace with that, and I still get to live  a long life. 

I am single for now, and my job pays okay.  (Mid 50ís).  I have a 401k that isnít great because I graduated in the recession and took whatever job was available at the time and wasnít able to have one for a few years, but now at age 32 Iím contributing 7%.  The company matches up to 3% fully and half a percent up to 5%.  I add another percent whenever I get a raise.

The good news is that I can write really well, which makes my side hustle very lucrative.  It has given me a nice savings account although not nearly as nice as many of you on here.  Iíve been scared of investing in the past because my medical expenses are so insane I never know when Iím going to drop a few grand for a hospital stay or some infusions. 

The other good thing is that I am approached so much for freelancing I donít even have to look for stuff, and one of the projects Iím doing now have 50% royalties with half ownership in perpetuity so it will be passive instead come for years.  I plan to invest this money - something I havenít done before. Iím going to bite the bullet on not having cash in my account.  I donít want to invest in real estate right now because I do feel like the housing bubble in my area is going to burst and I have a great deal on my little apartment at the moment. The utilities are crazy low.

Iím hoping to do something safe and simple.  Is investing the right move here?  I have everything paid off except for a small student loan Iím keeping around for the credit score and my car (0% interest). I want to retire early and enjoy some life, but with my restrictions, should I do something safer?

jlcnuke

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #1 on: July 11, 2018, 04:23:54 AM »
First off, you should evaluate your health insurance situation. At all times you should have money saved up to afford your max out of pocket costs allowed on your health insurance plan.

If possible, utilize a HSA for paying those costs.

Then, ensure you establish an adequate emergency fund. After that, additional investing is a great idea whether you have a disability or not.  I know that my disability was a factor in my decision to pursue FIRE and it sounds like yours has had a similar impact for you.

There are a lot of places to find suggestions for the recommended order of investments (or investment priorities) and I'm sure someone will link at least one of them for you if you haven't seen them.

former player

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #2 on: July 11, 2018, 04:54:22 AM »
You don't need to keep your student  loans around for your credit score: that's a myth.  Even if you did need a loan to keep your credit score up, having credit cards and paying them off before interest accrues will do the same job, as will your car loan.


Here's the investment order thread mentioned by jlcnuke -

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/investor-alley/investment-order/



marty998

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #3 on: July 11, 2018, 05:14:52 AM »
You don't need to keep your student  loans around for your credit score: that's a myth.  Even if you did need a loan to keep your credit score up, having credit cards and paying them off before interest accrues will do the same job, as will your car loan.

One wonders if this is a deliberate misinformation strategy designed to get people to keep paying interest.

Promise I am not wearing a tin foil hat...

Writer_Girl

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #4 on: July 11, 2018, 05:15:50 AM »
The insurance I have through my job is really good, but if I retire early Iím a little nervous about that. I think the whole country is nervous about that right now. I honestly could quit my job and make a living freelancing, but I like my job, and HELLO HEALTH INSURANCE.  I also qualify for a grant that pays for my scripts right now and if I quit that goes away.

And my emergency fund is more than a yearís salary so I think Iím okay there. But like...what is an emergency fund for someone like me?  Thatís the hard part, I guess.

I have an HSA with work but I didnít know there were HSAís available if you retire early. Iíll look into that for sure.

The student loan is my ďoldest accountĒ so thatís why it makes me nervous to close it! Wonít that hurt me? Also I deduct my interest each year....


jlcnuke

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #5 on: July 11, 2018, 07:05:23 AM »
To put credit scores in perspective, I had my score over 800 when I had no loans of any kind in the previous 5 years, just a few credit cards that I use regularly and regularly pay off so they always have a low balance and pay no interest. You don't need to keep any loans to have a good credit score.

snacky

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #6 on: July 11, 2018, 09:03:33 AM »
Why do you need to keep your credit score up anyways? Taking a hit (which it sounds like you might not) to reduce your monthly obligations is worth it, and it doesn't sound like you plan on taking out loans any time soon.

I've become unable to work due to an illness, so I have a lot of sympathy for your situation. Having medical crap happening means there's always a huge factor out of your control. I intend to do A, B, and C, but will I be well enough that day? Who knows! So you roll with it and do what you can. It sucks, but there's not much anyone can do.

Lanthiriel

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #7 on: July 11, 2018, 09:22:18 AM »
The student loan is my ďoldest accountĒ so thatís why it makes me nervous to close it! Wonít that hurt me? Also I deduct my interest each year....

It's an installment loan, not a revolving loan, so no, it doesn't make sense not to pay it off. There's almost no chance you are paying less in interest than you can deduct from your taxes, so the loan is costing you money and probably not having that much of an impact on your credit score.

Also, I tend not to keep credit cards around for more than a year at a time (so my "length of average accounts" is very low) and my score is over 800. Paying on time, not having a huge debt-to-income ratio, and low utilization are much weightier factors in credit score.

FIRE@50

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #8 on: July 11, 2018, 09:30:17 AM »
I also don't understand the perfect credit score obsession that so many have, unless you are looking for a mortgage in the near future.

OK, back on topic. I think the HSA cannot be stressed enough in your situation if available to you. The money is tax free going in and tax free going out.

Good luck.

Writer_Girl

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #9 on: July 11, 2018, 09:37:12 AM »
Okay I have an 817.  You guys have convinced me.  Iíll pay it off.  :)

Thank you for putting it in perspective.

jjcamembert

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #10 on: July 11, 2018, 02:29:28 PM »
Lots of people here are saying HSA, but depending on your annual health expenses it may not be the best option.

Due to chronic illness, we determined that a regular healthcare plan + FSA is better for us right now than HSA once you add it all together. You usually can't get an HSA without a high-deductible plan, so if you spend a lot on health the HSA is not worth it because you basically pay for all expenses, whereas a regular plan is capped much lower. The FSA functions the same as an HSA except the money disappears if you don't use it. In our case we definitely use it.

Also keep in mind that if your health expenses are greater than 10% of your annual income, you can deduct the amount over 10% (assuming you itemize as well).

hops

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #11 on: July 11, 2018, 05:49:55 PM »
Due to chronic illness, we determined that a regular healthcare plan + FSA is better for us right now than HSA once you add it all together. You usually can't get an HSA without a high-deductible plan, so if you spend a lot on health the HSA is not worth it because you basically pay for all expenses, whereas a regular plan is capped much lower. The FSA functions the same as an HSA except the money disappears if you don't use it. In our case we definitely use it.

Also keep in mind that if your health expenses are greater than 10% of your annual income, you can deduct the amount over 10% (assuming you itemize as well).

Despite our best efforts we could never get the HSA option to make sense for my wife, whose yearly healthcare costs are often astronomical. She just started a new job with a wider array of insurance options, including more attractive HSAs than were available to her previously, but it looks like a PPO and FSA are still the better deal.


lhamo

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #12 on: July 11, 2018, 06:45:30 PM »
Is the student loan federal?  If so then I believe if you ever end up going on SSDI due to your disability then you might be able to have it discharged -- check with your lender.  That might be one reason to argue for keeping it around while you pay off the car loan, but since you say it is small then it is probably better just to pay it off and get rid of the interest charges.

You may also want to spend a significant amount of time/energy now, while you have it, researching how applying for and staying on SSDI works.  Fellow forum member and awesome person @Tami1982 has recently made the decision to go off it, due to not wanting to artificially limit her income, and she has a lot of valuable experience on the ins/outs.

If you are in an expanded Medicaid state do be aware that you will qualify for medicaid as soon as your income drops below the thresholds (around 10k/year for a single person, I think).  Again, something you might want to research in advance, as Medicaid benefits are actually really good if your state supports the program and you live in a high density area with the population to support good services.  I got cataract surgery in both eyes last year with a top surgeon at the top eye institute in the area, and didn't pay a penny.  All our prescriptions have had no copays.  Etc. etc.

CrustyBadger

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #13 on: July 11, 2018, 07:14:12 PM »
Writer_Girl, how disabling is your condition expected to get as time goes on?  Is it something that would likely qualify you for Social Security Disability Insurance (and, are you currently in a job that pays into SSDI?)

If you are, and if people with your condition end up disabled enough to be approved for SSDI, do know that two years after approval, you can start to receive Medicare benefits.

If you don't already know, here is a link to a list of conditions that may qualify for SSDI along with the medical criteria that would be used to evaluate them:

https://www.ssa.gov/disability/professionals/bluebook/AdultListings.htm?src=gsn100

Writer_Girl

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #14 on: July 11, 2018, 08:18:48 PM »
@CrustyBadger I pay into social security, so I think so?  Very good point about the SSDI - I definitely want to keep that in my back pocket, as it looks to pay better than just disability.  Is that something I could get in addition to "normal" disability or instead of?

Also @lhamo the student loan is Navient.  Boo. :-/

haha...I wasn't very specific, but I am the lucky owner or TWO non-curable diseases that would actually qualify me for SSDI.  I should really get double the money, right?   The cause of both?  UNKNOWN.  GENETIC LOTTO, BABY. 

My doctors say they aren't linked.  And man, I used to work out like crazy.  No one else in my family has any of them.

And they're both pretty invisible.  One will remain that way because it can be managed, and the other may rear its ugly head.  Doctors HAVE made a lot of advancements, though, and I told them to attack them with any medicines they can (one has medicines that can kind of keep it at bay, maybe, but that's all).

Right now, I can still run (but I hate running) and exercise and mostly do all the stuff I normally do, and most of my friends don't even know I'm sick.  I keep it very secret, and I don't want to lose my job over people finding out.  Some people will do anything to get rid of a disabled person.  It's pretty gross.  If I relapse, I just have to figure out an excuse to disappear for a couple weeks while they fix me, and then I go back to pretending to be normal.  Yay!  I mean, I hope.  So far it's worked that way.

The scary part right now is honestly the money.  My drugs is ridiculously expensive. I'm getting GOOD at hospital stays.  I can give myself shots literally better than a nurse.  I just...wish I didn't have to be scared about money.  I wish disabled people weren't always expected to live on the cusp of bankruptcy. 

@lhamo, what you posted about medicare makes me feel relieved.  I was always so scared it wouldn't be up to snuff with my current insurance and then they'd make me go on a sub-par med.

And @snacky thank you - I am a bit of a control freak so I tend to obsess about what I CAN control.

I really, really appreciate all the insight.  I am saving this all up. :)

CrustyBadger

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #15 on: July 12, 2018, 06:29:24 AM »
There are different things that people refer to as "disability" so I will summarize:

1) Private disability insurance:  this is a policy you buy on your own, or through your job.   There are short term disability policies and long term disability policies.  If you already have a known condition (or two!) it might be too expensive or not possible for you to purchase these policies, unless they are offered to everyone through your job.  These policies might replace 40-60% of your salary if you become too disabled to work.  (If you work for the federal government, there is a plan you are automatically enrolled in called FERS disability which functions similarly to private disability policies -- it is not SSDI)

2) SSDI:  an insurance policy that many people pay into through paycheck withholding.  I didn't realize it but not all jobs pay into SSDI.   If you are paying into Social Security this includes SSDI.  There are rules on how many years you have to have worked, to apply for this benefit once you are disabled.  Basically if you are 31 or older you need to have worked at least 5 of the past 10 years in order to qualify.   SSDI is hard to qualify for medically.  If you do qualify, you will receive a monthly amount that varies depending on how much you earned and paid in.  I'm not clear on how that amount is calculated but the average payment is about $1100 a month and the maximum payment is something like $2600 a month.  This money is usually deducted from anything you are getting from a private Long Term Disability plan.   After 2 years receiving SSDI benefits you automatically qualify for Medicare, at least some part of it.  There are no asset restrictions for SSDI, but there are income restrictions.  If you are receiving SSDI but start to earn some money doing other things, your SSDI will be discontinued-- not sure what the amount is.

3)  If you have no work history, or not enough to qualify for SSDI, or if you never paid into SSDI and you are unable to work due to disability, there is a program called SSI.  This will pay something like $750 per month, and if this is your only source of income, you would probably qualify for Medicaid.

maizeman

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #16 on: July 12, 2018, 07:32:08 AM »
3)  If you have no work history, or not enough to qualify for SSDI, or if you never paid into SSDI and you are unable to work due to disability, there is a program called SSI.  This will pay something like $750 per month, and if this is your only source of income, you would probably qualify for Medicaid.

But it's important to note that SSI _does_ have very stringent maximum asset requirements and if you go above them the income is cut off, so if you don't anticipate having enough work history to qualify for SSDI it changes whether it makes sense to accumulate savings.

(Which is a stupid way to design the system for a lot of reasons, but not something under any of our controls).

CrustyBadger

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #17 on: July 12, 2018, 07:55:36 AM »
3)  If you have no work history, or not enough to qualify for SSDI, or if you never paid into SSDI and you are unable to work due to disability, there is a program called SSI.  This will pay something like $750 per month, and if this is your only source of income, you would probably qualify for Medicaid.

But it's important to note that SSI _does_ have very stringent maximum asset requirements and if you go above them the income is cut off, so if you don't anticipate having enough work history to qualify for SSDI it changes whether it makes sense to accumulate savings.

(Which is a stupid way to design the system for a lot of reasons, but not something under any of our controls).

Yes.  There are no asset restrictions for receiving SSDI.  But for SSI there are significant asset restrictions.  I think it is $2000, not counting your (one) home, one vehicle, household goods like clothing and furniture.

Writer_Girl

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #18 on: July 12, 2018, 10:57:25 AM »
So from the sounds of it, if I would ever *need* to quit, I'd most definitely qualify for SSDI, but I most definitely also don't want to quit until am ready to FIRE or I have to.

I could probably honestly make a case right now to get approved for it, but I don't want to.  Also, I figure the longer I work, the more money I would hopefully make from it if I ever need it.

That means I'll likely never be approved for disability insurance outside of work, but I already have and am paying for long-term and short-term disability insurance through work.  I think we get short term free, but the long-term was so cheap I started paying for it when I first started because I was like, eh, why not?  I'll probably never need it, but it's like a dollar.

heheheheh.  Oh, naive little Writer_Girl! 

I am SO GLAD to know about SSDI, because for the longest time I seriously thought disabled people could only live off of what I believe I thought of as SSI, which is basically nothing.   SSDI really isn't great, honestly, but it's...workable. 

Also, wtf, SSI?  So basically I would have to spend every penny before I qualified?  That's...insane.  It's basically a way of keeping disabled people poor.  That's horrid.

CrustyBadger

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #19 on: July 12, 2018, 11:22:05 AM »
So from the sounds of it, if I would ever *need* to quit, I'd most definitely qualify for SSDI, but I most definitely also don't want to quit until am ready to FIRE or I have to.

Yes -- as long as you can physically work, it is probably far better financially to stay employed than to go on disability!  As you can see the maximum SSDI is around $30,000 a year and that is taxable.

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I could probably honestly make a case right now to get approved for it, but I don't want to.  Also, I figure the longer I work, the more money I would hopefully make from it if I ever need it.

It is very difficult to get approved for SSDI.  The younger you are, the harder it is, because they assume you have time to get trained to do some other work that is within your physical capacity.  For example, you mention that you can earn decent money through your writing side job?

But it is something to keep in mind if your condition becomes worse.  There are ways to strengthen your eventual case, starting now, by document your condition, keeping medical records and tests, building up a long term relationship with a reputable treating physician etc.

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That means I'll likely never be approved for disability insurance outside of work, but I already have and am paying for long-term and short-term disability insurance through work.  I think we get short term free, but the long-term was so cheap I started paying for it when I first started because I was like, eh, why not?  I'll probably never need it, but it's like a dollar.

That's FANTASTIC news!   LTD usually is easier to qualify for in the event you do become disabled, and might pay you a larger amount of money than SSDI.   I would take some time to review what you have signed up for, just so you know. For example, if you move to a different job, can you take the LTD plan with you or does it end?   That might be a key consideration for you if you need to switch jobs.

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I am SO GLAD to know about SSDI, because for the longest time I seriously thought disabled people could only live off of what I believe I thought of as SSI, which is basically nothing.   SSDI really isn't great, honestly, but it's...workable. 

Yes, SSDI is not great but better than SSI.   If you have kids under 18 there is also a benefit for them.  And the big benefit is that after you have been on SSDI for 2 years, you qualify for Medicare.

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Also, wtf, SSI?  So basically I would have to spend every penny before I qualified?  That's...insane.  It's basically a way of keeping disabled people poor.  That's horrid.

Yes.  This is the "safety net" for disabled people in the US.

snacky

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2018, 03:25:46 PM »
A big part of my income is LTD. It's great, when it works. Other times it cuts out while they re-assess my eligibility or they make me jump through crazy hoops. Insurance's business model is sucessful because they pay out as little as possible, so they are always trying to boot people off. If you get LTD, great! But have backup plans for when they are being assholes.

Writer_Girl

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2018, 06:05:26 PM »
I don't even know what that "safety net" is.

I don't understand, honestly, why the world demands that disabled people aren't allowed to live decent lives.  It's like that if they get above a certain station they have to be punched down in order to be helped.  It's like...eugenics. 

Writer_Girl

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2018, 06:06:36 PM »
A big part of my income is LTD. It's great, when it works. Other times it cuts out while they re-assess my eligibility or they make me jump through crazy hoops. Insurance's business model is sucessful because they pay out as little as possible, so they are always trying to boot people off. If you get LTD, great! But have backup plans for when they are being assholes.

Ugh.  This is frustrating.  This makes me want to use the "ability" part of my disability to become a disability advocate, because I have something of a platform, but I'm also scared it would cause me to lose what I do have.

The world is effed up.

Writer_Girl

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #23 on: July 12, 2018, 07:20:39 PM »
Okay, so I went digging around my disability policy.  I wasn't diagnosed when I started working for this company.  However....


Preexisting Condition Limitation
Cigna doesnít pay benefits for any period of disability caused
or contributed to by, or resulting from, a preexisting condition.
A ďpreexisting conditionĒ means any injury or sickness for
which you incurred expenses, received medical treatment,
care or services including diagnostic measures, took prescribed
drugs or medicines, or for which a reasonable person would
have consulted a physician within three months before your
most recent effective date of insurance.
The preexisting condition limitation applies to any added
benefits or increases in benefits. This limitation doesnít
apply to a period of disability that begins after you are
covered for at least 12 months after your most recent
effective date of insurance, or the effective date of any
added or increased benefits.

Ummm....soooo....I'm not fully sure if I'd be covered. 

CrustyBadger

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #24 on: July 12, 2018, 07:44:49 PM »
You aren't disabled yet (according to them).  As long as it has been 12 months since you purchased the insurance, they should cover you if you become disabled and apply to them for the benefit (is how I read this).

former player

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #25 on: July 13, 2018, 02:08:38 AM »
The first thing you need to do is work out when was "your most recent effective date of insurance".  Hopefully it was when you started your current job which would have been more than 12 months ago, but the insurance company may have found a way of making it a more recent date.

Then you need to look back over your medical records for the three months before that date.  The problem here is that even if you had not been diagnosed at that time, if you had any contact with medical services within those tthree months which could later be attributed to your current diagnosis you may be refused payment.  Say for instance that a symptom of your current diagnosis is tiredness and you were investigated or treated for tiredness during that three month period.  The insurance company might use that as an excuse not to pay, because they will say that was the start of your disability and so it is a preexisting condition.


It's not cut and dried, even so - I find the last sentence of the condition confusing and ambiguous - I'm not sure what  "period of disability" in that sentence refers to, and whether the sentence refers back to the whole condition or only after a claim has already been acknowldged and a greater disability is then being claimed.   Definitely worth fighting for when needed.

Dr Kidstache

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #26 on: July 13, 2018, 10:49:45 AM »
All of my income is from SSDI and LTD. LTD is a NIGHTMARE. I wouldn't wish dealing with these insurance companies on my worst enemy. I am grateful for the benefits that I've received so far but they're incredibly tenuous and have required so much stress & lawyers that it's really negatively impacted my medical condition. Please don't assume that you would qualify for LTD benefits, no matter how straight-forward your medical condition may be. They do not play by the rules.
SSDI is very bureaucratic but much more straight-forward. Not much money but the real benefit is that SSDI beneficiaries are Medicare-eligible after 2 years of receiving payments.
For both, the main question is not "what are your medical diagnoses?" but rather "what are your physical and mental limitations that prevent you from working?". For example, you can have a terrible diagnosis, but you won't qualify for either SSDI or LTD unless you have documentation that it results in difficulties like sitting at a desk, following directions, being able to work for 4 hour without a nap, able to interact with others in an emotionally stable way, etc.

Tami1982

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #27 on: July 13, 2018, 02:01:15 PM »
Is the student loan federal?  If so then I believe if you ever end up going on SSDI due to your disability then you might be able to have it discharged -- check with your lender.  That might be one reason to argue for keeping it around while you pay off the car loan, but since you say it is small then it is probably better just to pay it off and get rid of the interest charges.

You may also want to spend a significant amount of time/energy now, while you have it, researching how applying for and staying on SSDI works.  Fellow forum member and awesome person @Tami1982 has recently made the decision to go off it, due to not wanting to artificially limit her income, and she has a lot of valuable experience on the ins/outs.

If you are in an expanded Medicaid state do be aware that you will qualify for medicaid as soon as your income drops below the thresholds (around 10k/year for a single person, I think).  Again, something you might want to research in advance, as Medicaid benefits are actually really good if your state supports the program and you live in a high density area with the population to support good services.  I got cataract surgery in both eyes last year with a top surgeon at the top eye institute in the area, and didn't pay a penny.  All our prescriptions have had no copays.  Etc. etc.

I have been through it all.  If you have any questions or need any advice about how this system works, hit me up.  I discharged half my loans (federal) but the private required a lawsuit.  After all that, I would rather have paid the money than go through that.  Wasn't worth it. 

I've never made what you made, so you are ahead of me in income from the get go.  I also have chronic degenerative conditions.  It's not a matter of if, but a matter of when.  What has been important to me is the be debt free and own my home.  That is the end I've been working toward the last six years.   I've been on SSDI for 12 years and it looks like it may be coming to an end soon.  You can see my journal if you want details, but this process is harrowing and scary. 

Best wishes, and know you are not alone!  We are out here working under the FI radar.  I'll never be what is considered traditional FI, but I can keep making my way towards it. 

Writer_Girl

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #28 on: July 15, 2018, 03:15:00 PM »
Thank you @Tami1982. I think I have come to realize that the world as a whole looks upon disabled people as lesser beings as that needs to be changed.  Honestly, I don't know if there is a government out there that believes that disabled people deserve to live as well as people who haven't been diagnosed or had an accident or something, which is unfortunate because it could happen to ANYONE, like TOMORROW, but the world just views us a less valuable.  It's literally in how the world is built.

I am hoping that someone the world can view disabled as being blonde, or being tall, or whatever.  It doesn't mean your life can't be awesome.  It's a thing.  It doesn't mean you deserve more or less.  It means you don't deserve an even playing field.

I am sure all marginalized people feel that way.

Writer_Girl

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Re: Growing a mustache...with a disability
« Reply #29 on: July 15, 2018, 03:42:03 PM »
Also, side note, if I disclose I have a disability, I become subject to this.

https://www.air.org/resource/air-index-pay-gap-workers-disabilities