Author Topic: Good winter bicycle gloves  (Read 4607 times)

davisgang90

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Good winter bicycle gloves
« on: October 01, 2013, 10:50:37 AM »
Mustachians!

I have embraced the bicycle commute lifestyle!

In the words of Ned Stark: Winter is coming.

Need recommendations for some good riding gloves for the Washington DC area.  Doesn't get terribly cold here, but the fingerless ones I'm using now probably won't work.

Recommendations?

lackofstache

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Re: Good winter bicycle gloves
« Reply #1 on: October 01, 2013, 10:56:24 AM »
Wool w/ some sort of wind barrier. I often get clammy in normal cycling specific gloves and I used to sweat while snowboarding. The best I've found are cheap wool gloves from an army-navy surplus and I got some "half-mits" last year from Rivendell: http://www.rivbike.com/product-p/ag4.htm

GuitarStv

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Re: Good winter bicycle gloves
« Reply #2 on: October 01, 2013, 11:29:04 AM »
I'd recommend that you get several pairs of gloves for different conditions.  No one pair will work for the whole winter.

When it's hovering just around freezing I find that I can often get away with very thin full fingered gloves.  Home depot sells some pretty durable snug fitting work gloves for very cheap on sale.


^ I got these leather reinforced gloves with a padded palm for 6$ on sale, they're good for fall/early winter.

When it's below freezing (-5 to -15C ) but not super bitter I use some light weight ski gloves.  When it's getting into the bitter cold levels (under -15C) I use heavy duty wizard style snowmobile gloves. 

A lot of what you use will depend on how warm your hands are.  My hands stay warm when it gets cold, my wife can't bike much below freezing before switching to a full mitt because her hands get cold fast.

Left

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Re: Good winter bicycle gloves
« Reply #3 on: October 01, 2013, 11:54:59 AM »
I got a question for people on here about this as well. I hadn't thought about riding in winter yet but seeing this thread, I've started to wonder. Is it possible to install wind deflectors onto the handlebar of bikes like I've seen on motorcycles?

I know it's easier to use a glove, but if it's part of the bike, I don't have to worry about bring it if it rains/gets cold and not having gloves with me. I have shifters on the stem so I don't have anything on the handlebar to get in the way, except for the brakes but I could probably fit it under the deflector.

Would I get laughed at if I tried this? Not that I care but I'm wondering why I haven't see anyone do this if it seems like a good idea. I see mud deflectors for the chain/tires but none on the handlebars yet. I'd like to have it for rocks too if that happens to hit my hand.



seems like it would be good for mountain bikes too, if people ride through low brush?
edit: In a month or so, maybe in December when I have time off. I'll try to find something to do this and try it out. I want to learn to ride bike without anything to interfere with it. So I'll do this when I add fenders/racks at the later time. 3 modifications planned for bike already :) I hope I'm not weighing too much on it
« Last Edit: October 01, 2013, 12:01:35 PM by eyem »

Russ

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Re: Good winter bicycle gloves
« Reply #4 on: October 01, 2013, 12:16:17 PM »
I got a question for people on here about this as well. I hadn't thought about riding in winter yet but seeing this thread, I've started to wonder. Is it possible to install wind deflectors onto the handlebar of bikes like I've seen on motorcycles?
you probably won't be going fast enough for this to work
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Would I get laughed at if I tried this?
yes
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Not that I care but I'm wondering why I haven't see anyone do this if it seems like a good idea. I see mud deflectors for the chain/tires but none on the handlebars yet. I'd like to have it for rocks too if that happens to hit my hand.
just gonna say you sound like a recumbent rider in the making. do you also happen to have a beard?
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seems like it would be good for mountain bikes too, if people ride through low brush?
just another thing to get ripped off by the brush IMO. That's really not a problem in the first place, anyway.
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edit: In a month or so, maybe in December when I have time off. I'll try to find something to do this and try it out. I want to learn to ride bike without anything to interfere with it. So I'll do this when I add fenders/racks at the later time. 3 modifications planned for bike already :) I hope I'm not weighing too much on it
let us know how it goes.

PindyStache

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Re: Good winter bicycle gloves
« Reply #5 on: October 01, 2013, 12:32:20 PM »
They do make windguards for bicycles, they just look a little bit different and are called Mitts/Pogies/Moose Mittens:

http://barmitts.com/

Apparently they make actual wind guards too... ? Seems very silly.
http://www.bikeradar.com/us/gear/category/accessories/product/review-breezeblockers-aeroblade-hand-guards-11-44401

I have a pair (forget which brand) and they work great, letting you go without gloves or with only lightweight gloves underneath to maintain use of shift paddles & brakes. I usually find my hands get too hot in them, even when it's pushing 0 degrees F.

I can't imagine the OP would need this for Washington DC though. I think the recommendations for wool or ski gloves would be way too warm too, but maybe that's just me. I would probably just recommend a pair of lightweight, full-fingered gloves like GuitarSrv posted.

GuitarStv

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Re: Good winter bicycle gloves
« Reply #6 on: October 01, 2013, 12:35:06 PM »
POGIES!


Yeah, they look pretty sweet for cold weather rides . . . I covet them and have decided to sew my own pair in the near future . . .


Russ

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Re: Good winter bicycle gloves
« Reply #7 on: October 01, 2013, 12:39:42 PM »
I didn't think the bar mitts counted since they actually insulate rather than just block wind with a fairing. Good find on the breezeblockers though. I like how they only go in the least convenient handlebar position for doing anything.

OP, what's it get down to in DC? low twenties? Depending on how hard you're riding, I'd do anything from a light ski glove to a thick but uninsulated full-finger cycling glove in the worst weather. You'll probably be able to get away with a "summer" full-finger most of the time

FunkyStickman

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Re: Good winter bicycle gloves
« Reply #8 on: October 01, 2013, 01:42:50 PM »
Three things you have to keep warm: hands, feet, and face. Everything else will pretty much warm up once you get rolling, but your extremities are always out in the wind, and they will need protection.

I've used inexpensive ski gloves, they're good down to about 25 degrees. Anything lower than that, or if it's below/close to freezing with rain, you'll want some gore-tex gloves. Money well spent... I wouldn't hesitate spending $50 on a pair of gloves that I knew would keep my hands warm and dry down to single digits. You don't know misery until you've ridden 30+ miles with numb hands and feet.

electriceagle

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Re: Good winter bicycle gloves
« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2013, 06:34:49 PM »
I highly recommend Sealskinz. They are warm gloves with a waterproof polymer layer in the middle.

They run about $35 at REI, but its money well spent if they enable you to bike to work instead of dragging 2 tons of steel and plastic along with you. Also, REI provides a minimum 1 year warranty.