Author Topic: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?  (Read 3813 times)

soccerluvof4

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Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« on: January 16, 2016, 09:40:04 AM »
ok so here goes.. As my Avatar/Name states I have 4 kids in Soccer. Currently I have a Daughter thats a sophomore in HS that got a full full ride to a big ten school and my Son who is a Junior just got a scholarship to a school in NC. Now boys in general dont get anywhere near what girls do based on alot of factors but mostly because of way less programs, alot of foreigners and reduced amount of scholarships. So we with him will have still a chunk to pay. We have money saved that will basically make it so he could go and have no debt but being Fire'd why spend it if i dont have to.

Its always been our intention to move to NC when we retired but we still have two young ones so ideally it would be now when our Daughter graduates from HS. So with a year and a half before my son basically goes off to NC and NC having a year living there requirement to establish residency I was thinking about maybe buying a house now and renting it out or??

A part of me feels this would be morally wrong but .....just looking for some ideas, feedback etc.. I could easily afford to by the house with out affecting our retirement as long as in 2.5 years I sold one of the houses in case we changed our mind.

Anyhow thoughts? what say you ?

ender

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2016, 09:43:33 AM »
I had a friend who moved states, worked part time while taking classes part time, and then after a year was considered a resident for tuition purposes and did school that way.

Might want to look into things like - https://www.ncsu.edu/grad/tuition-residency/


seattlecyclone

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2016, 09:54:36 AM »
Yeah, ender's link is good. If you actually moved there now (or over the summer) and your son spent his senior year in the state, I expect that would easily be sufficient to establish residency. Buying a house without occupying it probably would not, given that you would still be submitting high school transcripts from out of state and everything else.

Consider involving your son in this decision. He does have some financial stake in his education, right? If he thinks no amount of money is worth moving to a different state for senior year, he'll have some loans to pay off when he graduates.

soccerluvof4

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2016, 10:13:16 AM »
Yeah, ender's link is good. If you actually moved there now (or over the summer) and your son spent his senior year in the state, I expect that would easily be sufficient to establish residency. Buying a house without occupying it probably would not, given that you would still be submitting high school transcripts from out of state and everything else.

Consider involving your son in this decision. He does have some financial stake in his education, right? If he thinks no amount of money is worth moving to a different state for senior year, he'll have some loans to pay off when he graduates.
I had a friend who moved states, worked part time while taking classes part time, and then after a year was considered a resident for tuition purposes and did school that way.

Might want to look into things like - https://www.ncsu.edu/grad/tuition-residency/







Thanks for the link...and yea bit of a brain fart there he would have to forgo his Senior HS year where he currently is at. I keep him involved in all the matters though...Hmm!

lakemom

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2016, 10:39:17 AM »
Is his heart set on that school?  With one scholarship in hand could you contact other schools with good degree programs that have decent soccer teams and see what they have to offer.  Just because they have not yet scouted him doesn't mean they won't be interested.  An offer from a competing school should show that he has the skills to be an asset to any team.  Also is the soccer scholarship enough to offset the difference in instate tuition where you are at now and the increased cost of the out of state school?  Finally, have you talked to the financial aid office and asked what they can do to help you get the numbers closer together.  My kids have all gone to instate schools so I'm not sure how that works BUT maybe they could offer your son instate tuition along with the scholarship to help make their school more affordable.

soccerluvof4

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2016, 10:55:56 AM »
Is his heart set on that school?  With one scholarship in hand could you contact other schools with good degree programs that have decent soccer teams and see what they have to offer.  Just because they have not yet scouted him doesn't mean they won't be interested.  An offer from a competing school should show that he has the skills to be an asset to any team.  Also is the soccer scholarship enough to offset the difference in instate tuition where you are at now and the increased cost of the out of state school?  Finally, have you talked to the financial aid office and asked what they can do to help you get the numbers closer together.  My kids have all gone to instate schools so I'm not sure how that works BUT maybe they could offer your son instate tuition along with the scholarship to help make their school more affordable.



Hes had multiple offers within and outside of the State. Yes his heart is set on it as hes always dreamed of playing in NC plus the fact that we are going to end up there anyhow. And yes it equals out fairly better than tuition of in state which is what we had saved BUT if there was away to save more I would.

Having not filled out an application yet for financial aid not sure how that works when your retired and living off investments. Just committed so just thought of this.

DebtFreeBy25

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2016, 05:27:32 PM »
ok so here goes.. As my Avatar/Name states I have 4 kids in Soccer. Currently I have a Daughter thats a sophomore in HS that got a full full ride to a big ten school and my Son who is a Junior just got a scholarship to a school in NC. Now boys in general dont get anywhere near what girls do based on alot of factors but mostly because of way less programs, alot of foreigners and reduced amount of scholarships. So we with him will have still a chunk to pay. We have money saved that will basically make it so he could go and have no debt but being Fire'd why spend it if i dont have to.

Its always been our intention to move to NC when we retired but we still have two young ones so ideally it would be now when our Daughter graduates from HS. So with a year and a half before my son basically goes off to NC and NC having a year living there requirement to establish residency I was thinking about maybe buying a house now and renting it out or??

A part of me feels this would be morally wrong but .....just looking for some ideas, feedback etc.. I could easily afford to by the house with out affecting our retirement as long as in 2.5 years I sold one of the houses in case we changed our mind.

Anyhow thoughts? what say you ?

Personally I feel that all is fair in war and higher education. If anything in this situation is immoral it's the absurd cost (and low rate of return) of higher education. I agree with the other comments that your son would likely have to attend school in NC or take a gap year in order to claim residency. If you file taxes in NC, however, that would likely satisfy the residency requirement.

soccerluvof4

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2016, 05:39:23 PM »
^ yea its ridiculous. We have told our kids we dont care where they go and we will help up to the cost of in state tuition so I cant back out on my word now nor is that my goal BUT if i can save some of that money i thought why not try.

AZDude

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #8 on: January 19, 2016, 08:40:54 AM »
This happens all the time here in Arizona. Not the exact scenario, but the idea. This is a transient state with lots of transplants from the Midwest, and lots of "snowbirds". So plenty of times what happens is kids from the Midwest apply to Arizona universities using the address of a relative here in the state. Most of the time they get away with it. I don't actually know anyone who has been caught and am not sure what the penalty is if you were caught.

Morally, its a gray area. Worst case, you move when he does, and pay full price for a year before getting the discount.

I'm a red panda

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #9 on: January 19, 2016, 09:03:41 AM »
Does the scholarship also reduce the rate at which he pays tuition?

I know that at the state school I went to (Texas) if your scholarship was from the school, the rest of your tuition was billed at in-state rates.  So departments often offered recruited out of state students small scholarships; just because it had the effect of greatly reducing their tuition; it had to be a competitive scholarship, that was won over Texas residents for the out of state student to qualify. (It was called a non-resident tuition waiver.)

May be worth checking into for your case. It would prevent you from needing to move!
« Last Edit: January 19, 2016, 09:05:12 AM by iowajes »

wenchsenior

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #10 on: January 19, 2016, 09:31:50 AM »
This happens all the time here in Arizona. Not the exact scenario, but the idea. This is a transient state with lots of transplants from the Midwest, and lots of "snowbirds". So plenty of times what happens is kids from the Midwest apply to Arizona universities using the address of a relative here in the state. Most of the time they get away with it. I don't actually know anyone who has been caught and am not sure what the penalty is if you were caught.

Morally, its a gray area. Worst case, you move when he does, and pay full price for a year before getting the discount.

I didn't really feel this was a morally gray area when I did it. I moved to Tucson and paid out of state tuition at the U for two years. By then I'd totally fallen in love with the state and would have stayed after graduation if appropriate work was available (I knew the odds weren't good for both me and SO to have such work, but still). By then I'd been working part time for several years, lived at a regular address, had an instate drivers license, paid in state taxes, voted in AZ elections. I enrolled for a year at community college at in-state tuition rates and thereafter completed a subsequent 4 years at the U with in-state status as well. This allowed me to graduate with no student loans, which was a huge boost. As we'd expected, we then had to leave Arizona for to get work, and we didn't move back to either of our 'home states' for that, so I don't feel I scammed the system. We would have stayed in AZ, had appropriate work been available. 20 years later, I still watch for the elusive job openings back there.

ender

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #11 on: January 19, 2016, 09:46:28 AM »
Does the scholarship also reduce the rate at which he pays tuition?

I know that at the state school I went to (Texas) if your scholarship was from the school, the rest of your tuition was billed at in-state rates.  So departments often offered recruited out of state students small scholarships; just because it had the effect of greatly reducing their tuition; it had to be a competitive scholarship, that was won over Texas residents for the out of state student to qualify. (It was called a non-resident tuition waiver.)

May be worth checking into for your case. It would prevent you from needing to move!

That's how my grad school was if you had an assistanceship (either RA or TA). You were assessed instate tuition for your grad school in this situation.

I'm a red panda

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #12 on: January 19, 2016, 09:56:59 AM »

That's how my grad school was if you had an assistanceship (either RA or TA). You were assessed instate tuition for your grad school in this situation.

I think that is pretty common.  This was undergrad though.  All my friends needed was a $1,000+ scholarship and to fill out a waiver and their tuition was then instate instead of out of state.

soccerluvof4

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Re: Getting around the College Residency rules-Possible? Ethical?
« Reply #13 on: January 19, 2016, 02:12:15 PM »
Does the scholarship also reduce the rate at which he pays tuition?

I know that at the state school I went to (Texas) if your scholarship was from the school, the rest of your tuition was billed at in-state rates.  So departments often offered recruited out of state students small scholarships; just because it had the effect of greatly reducing their tuition; it had to be a competitive scholarship, that was won over Texas residents for the out of state student to qualify. (It was called a non-resident tuition waiver.)

May be worth checking into for your case. It would prevent you from needing to move!



His scholarship is Athletic so at least in this case that portion of it remains the same