Author Topic: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?  (Read 9500 times)

T-Rex

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I want to be able to call myself a real Mustachian. I think I need some encouragement and probably face punches as well.

Problem: I have a gorgeous 1967 Mustang. I'd estimate it gets 10 miles per gallon.

PROS: Looks amazing, sounds like Aslan roaring Narnia into existence, intoxicating old car smell, is fast, popular, has gotten me free beer for existing and free maintenance for the chance to touch it. It is a sexy dream car and I own it free and clear.

CONS: Insanely gas guzzling, outrageous death trap, requires parking spot, new parts are expensive and it could always use them, requires insurance, has to be washed constantly, isn't a practical vehicle for any place I ever plan to live.

I wanted to keep it so DW the mechanic could make a project of it, but I know we won't have money for a garage or a project anytime soon. I know my car makes the earth sad and I would be wealthier without it, but I feel emotional about letting it go. I want to fully believe car-free is the way to be. I want to replace my love for my clown car with happy dreams of a super cool moped.

Extra info: My deployment is almost done, and I have less than a year left in the military. I live about 6 miles from work.

P.S. Despite having old man problems, I am actually a lady.

purplepants

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #1 on: July 14, 2014, 09:23:02 AM »
Yeah, sorry, no.  I wouldn't let that car go for anything. 

If you love the car that much and it's paid for, why not keep it while driving it as little as possible?  Tell your insurance company that you'll only be driving it occasionally as a recreational vehicle.  Ride your bike to work or have DW drop you off (is she stationed near you?).  Carpool with someone, maybe?

If it were me, I'd be trying to find the most mustachian way to keep my dream car.

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #2 on: July 14, 2014, 09:49:18 AM »
Yeah, sorry, no.  I wouldn't let that car go for anything. 

If you love the car that much and it's paid for, why not keep it while driving it as little as possible?  Tell your insurance company that you'll only be driving it occasionally as a recreational vehicle.  Ride your bike to work or have DW drop you off (is she stationed near you?).  Carpool with someone, maybe?

If it were me, I'd be trying to find the most mustachian way to keep my dream car.

See what I mean? I drive it to and from work a few times a week (we carpool in a efficient car when possible), and take it out for a little cruise every once in a while. I don't pay much insurance as it is. The worst part right now would be the gas, and the worst thing when I get out would be the complete lack of a place to park it.

skunkfunk

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #3 on: July 14, 2014, 10:25:44 AM »
I have a 69 firebird I'm keeping around that I plan on restoring in my free time when I retire. I probably get 8 mpg. Mechanically it is almost perfect, but body and interior need replaced.

I drive it a few miles every week or two just to keep the battery charged and stuff. Keep the car, bike to work, quit commuting in it but 2-4 times a month, drive it sparingly, you'll regret getting rid of it. Build a DIY metal building to store it in later if you don't have a spot.


purplepants

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #4 on: July 14, 2014, 10:35:59 AM »
Yeah, sorry, no.  I wouldn't let that car go for anything. 

If you love the car that much and it's paid for, why not keep it while driving it as little as possible?  Tell your insurance company that you'll only be driving it occasionally as a recreational vehicle.  Ride your bike to work or have DW drop you off (is she stationed near you?).  Carpool with someone, maybe?

If it were me, I'd be trying to find the most mustachian way to keep my dream car.

See what I mean? I drive it to and from work a few times a week (we carpool in a efficient car when possible), and take it out for a little cruise every once in a while. I don't pay much insurance as it is. The worst part right now would be the gas, and the worst thing when I get out would be the complete lack of a place to park it.

No idea where you're planning on living when you get out, but maybe you can come up with an arrangement.  Maybe find a one car family with a two car garage and rent the extra bay for half what a storage unit would cost = everybody wins!

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #5 on: July 14, 2014, 10:50:02 AM »
There is no possible way I could afford property, storage, or parking where I'm going. Just trust me on that.

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #6 on: July 14, 2014, 10:57:11 AM »
If you have any doubt: I don't have a high school diploma, my hometown is one of the most expensive places in the United States, and if in 18 months time DW doesn't have less than zero dollars, I'll be kind of happy.

Mrs. Frugalwoods

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #7 on: July 14, 2014, 11:01:26 AM »
Here's the thing: if you really love this car and it's one of your only splurges, keep it. Since you already own it free and clear... if you can just not drive it too often (to save on gas) and still enjoy owning it, maybe that's your solution.

On the other hand, if you need to sell it, do you know how much you could get for it? Maybe knowing that $ amount will help ease the pain?

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #8 on: July 14, 2014, 11:08:24 AM »
Here's the thing: if you really love this car and it's one of your only splurges, keep it. Since you already own it free and clear... if you can just not drive it too often (to save on gas) and still enjoy owning it, maybe that's your solution.

On the other hand, if you need to sell it, do you know how much you could get for it? Maybe knowing that $ amount will help ease the pain?

That was what I did the past 4 years. Everywhere I've lived was flat, dry, car friendly, and had free parking. That's about to change.

Good suggestion.

Cpa Cat

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2014, 11:29:07 AM »
If your plan is to have any car, then I think you should keep this one and a bike. Make it your primary vehicle.

If your plan is to have no car, because it's not reasonable to own a car, then you should sell it.

A place to put it is clearly a challenge. And if you're just going to end up parking it on the street, exposed to the elements, then it's probably best to get rid of it. Weather is a harsh mistress for classic cars and it's not going to improve with age without a garage. Certainly, if you're going to leave it outside, then it doesn't make much sense to invest money in it.

It may be sad - but you can always buy another classic car at a later date, when you're in a better financial position.

[In a way, I don't have much conviction behind these words. Even now, a 1976 MGBGT sits in my garage. I think that spot looks perfect to park my lawnmower in, but my husband stares lovingly at his little red mistress. Despite the bills, despite the fact that there's an expensive rust issue developing, despite the fact that it sometimes refuses to start because it's "tempermental" - every time we have this debate, the car stays.]
« Last Edit: July 14, 2014, 11:50:24 AM by Cpa Cat »

TrMama

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2014, 11:32:34 AM »
If you figure this out, please let me know.

My DH is insanely attached to his silly sports car and I'd love for him to sell it. I've been unsuccessful in this endeavor for the past for 11 years. It's now so old, I'm afraid he'll start pouring money into it when catastrophic mechanical things start going wrong.

gimp

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2014, 11:45:57 AM »
I am going to buy a '67 mustang, in shit condition, and restore it. And never sell it. So I wouldn't sell it if I were you, either.

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My DH is insanely attached to his silly sports car and I'd love for him to sell it. I've been unsuccessful in this endeavor for the past for 11 years. It's now so old, I'm afraid he'll start pouring money into it when catastrophic mechanical things start going wrong.

Yes, that's what a hobby is. If I had one, I wouldn't sell it for anyone.

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2014, 11:48:31 AM »
What I'm wondering is about the location you're going to be when you get out. It's apparently a very high cost of living location, correct? So you're worried about having a place to keep the car more so than anything else? Are there any alternatives?

PloddingInsight

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2014, 12:06:55 PM »
Here's an idea.  It sounds like you love this car, but you can't afford to hold onto it right now.

Sell the car.  Put the proceeds in a special investment account that doesn't mix with your other funds.

One day when you can afford the parking and insurance again, cash out that special account and buy a similar car.

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #14 on: July 14, 2014, 01:33:34 PM »
I am going to buy a '67 mustang, in shit condition, and restore it. And never sell it. So I wouldn't sell it if I were you, either.

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My DH is insanely attached to his silly sports car and I'd love for him to sell it. I've been unsuccessful in this endeavor for the past for 11 years. It's now so old, I'm afraid he'll start pouring money into it when catastrophic mechanical things start going wrong.

Yes, that's what a hobby is. If I had one, I wouldn't sell it for anyone.
I am going to buy a '67 mustang, in shit condition, and restore it. And never sell it. So I wouldn't sell it if I were you, either.

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My DH is insanely attached to his silly sports car and I'd love for him to sell it. I've been unsuccessful in this endeavor for the past for 11 years. It's now so old, I'm afraid he'll start pouring money into it when catastrophic mechanical things start going wrong.

Yes, that's what a hobby is. If I had one, I wouldn't sell it for anyone.

Uh... if your fantasy is to be a mechanic, I'd say go for it. My car started as a rolling chassis, and I had it restored and modified. During it's life with me, I had to study a lot and order a lot of parts, constantly check out the car and figure out what needed to be replaced, and what I could actually afford to replace. BTW I was not successful at finding every part, and not for lack of looking. It's old as hell. That side of it isn't my idea of fun, it sucks to rebuild something and find out certain things do not exist in useable condition. (Not sure if I'm preaching to the choir, here.)

JCfire

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #15 on: July 14, 2014, 01:41:08 PM »
Your car is probably worth between $20k and $40k depending on body type, engine, and condition:
http://www.hagerty.com/price-guide/1967-Ford-Mustang

If I were you, and I were having a hard time pulling the trigger on selling this car, I'd start daydreaming of the most fun I could have by spending about 10-20% of the proceeds.  You can probably conjure up a lot of good feelings this way which ease the pain.  After you sell the car, you can make a separate decision about whether to actually splurge on that expense or not.

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #16 on: July 14, 2014, 02:16:55 PM »
What I'm wondering is about the location you're going to be when you get out. It's apparently a very high cost of living location, correct? So you're worried about having a place to keep the car more so than anything else? Are there any alternatives?

Yes, very high cost and I'll have a modest income. I am looking to cut my cost of living, and my biggest expense after rent is gasoline.

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #17 on: July 14, 2014, 02:23:45 PM »
Your car is probably worth between $20k and $40k depending on body type, engine, and condition:
http://www.hagerty.com/price-guide/1967-Ford-Mustang

If I were you, and I were having a hard time pulling the trigger on selling this car, I'd start daydreaming of the most fun I could have by spending about 10-20% of the proceeds.  You can probably conjure up a lot of good feelings this way which ease the pain.  After you sell the car, you can make a separate decision about whether to actually splurge on that expense or not.

Mine is the least valuable of those types. I think I've seen similar to mine go between $9K-$15K. That is good, maybe put it toward a better cause than having my shiny cool thing.

gimp

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #18 on: July 14, 2014, 02:27:39 PM »
Out of curiosity, you wouldn't happen to be in California or near it, would you? If you decide to sell, maybe you should send me a message. And some photos for everyone to see, because it sounds like a fine car. It isn't by any chance a Fastback, is it?

I don't have any fantasy to be a mechanic professionally... just as a hobby. But I can and will gladly fabricate my own parts when I need to.

RetireAbroadAt35

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #19 on: July 14, 2014, 02:38:26 PM »
Let it go.  There are other projects and other automotive loves in your future.  This is an opportunity to do something new.

I have a car, not quite as cool as yours, that I love dearly.  I almost relocated to a place where it would have rusted away and I made a plan to do some repairs and then sell it.  Thankfully my plans have changed and I'm keeping it ... for now.  However, if my circumstances really did change, I'd shed only a single tear and then move on.

Think of all the things you could do with that money in the future.  Think of how sad you'd be to let it wither in a poor climate or subject to vandalism / damage.

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #20 on: July 14, 2014, 03:10:18 PM »
Only storage option I can think of: give it to a family member in another town? I think that would be too much of an imposition.

Out of curiosity, you wouldn't happen to be in California or near it, would you? If you decide to sell, maybe you should send me a message. And some photos for everyone to see, because it sounds like a fine car. It isn't by any chance a Fastback, is it?

I don't have any fantasy to be a mechanic professionally... just as a hobby. But I can and will gladly fabricate my own parts when I need to.

Actually, I am from California. It is definitely nowhere near the coolest or most authentic when it comes to Mustangs. It is just a regular hardtop coupe in alright condition. It is in fine condition to drive. I think the main thing preventing me from just wanting to sell it is that when you have an old car like this, it is impossible to recover the money and sweat that went into keeping it road worthy. And most people have different ideas of "ideal" (all original, modified, performance, etc) For me, it was an all black daily driver with a nice big engine. For the most part I try to keep it looking like the real thing outwardly, aside from a plain billet grill up front instead of the pony in the corral. They are great looking cars.

It sounds like you have the right mindset / skills to tackle such a project. I just threw a good deal of money at it whenever I wanted to upgrade or fix something because I never had the time or skill. I'm sure it's more satisfying to be saving money on labor and keeping it for life.

gimp

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #21 on: July 14, 2014, 04:31:32 PM »
Indeed. The only way to recover the cost would be to do it more or less professionally. I've known people to buy a piece of shit for $1500, put $15k in parts and a $7k classic but modern-quality paint job on it, and sell it for $80k after spending a year restoring it. But they did it for 20, 30, 40 hours a week, between literal sweat equity and researching and calling around and buying and returning and ...

You are totally right that everyone's ideal is different. My ideal is a broken down interior. Then I won't feel bad gutting it and making it mine. :)

I'd also swap the engine and probably transmission to something modern; the old 289 looks beautiful, but let's be honest. It gets 10 miles to the gallon if you're lucky. I can replace that V8 with a 2.0 L 4-cylinder turbocharged engine, get 40 MPG, and put out more power. I love the classic look, but efficiency and power have both improved; I can get about 5x the efficiency which I can spend on a combination of fuel usage and power. (Don't worry, I wouldn't get a tiny 2.0 L for mine - I'd rather go for something meaner, less fuel efficient, and more powerful.)

With that said, I respect someone who keeps a classic car looking classic. I definitely understand not wanting to give it up. There's a huge difference between driving an SUV because everyone has one, and driving a classic car because you've put a lot of time, effort, and money into making it your baby. Both are large consumption items, but one is a hobby and the other is keeping up with the Jones's.

As far as giving it to a family member: It could be an imposition, but it depends on your family, and the terms. If someone said: "Here's a classic Mustang, yours to drive until I want it back; you pay gas and I pay repairs; just drive it once every week or two at the minimum and don't do anything stupid and take care of it and let me know asap if something needs fixing" I'd agree in a heartbeat.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2014, 04:33:03 PM by gimp »

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #22 on: July 14, 2014, 10:11:17 PM »
You are totally right that everyone's ideal is different. My ideal is a broken down interior. Then I won't feel bad gutting it and making it mine. :)

I wouldn't have been able to tear up or modify a perfectly good car.

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I'd also swap the engine and probably transmission to something modern ... I love the classic look, but efficiency and power have both improved; I can get about 5x the efficiency which I can spend on a combination of fuel usage and power.

That is an unusual idea. I have heard of people adding fuel injectors, but nothing too extreme. I read a few cool articles about restomod efficiency projects, but I wasn't sure if I would hate myself for doing it.

Quote
With that said, I respect someone who keeps a classic car looking classic.

I think of it as preserving history. I sometimes call it a time machine, and used to have the rule "no new music."

Quote
As far as giving it to a family member: It could be an imposition, but it depends on your family, and the terms. If someone said: "Here's a classic Mustang, yours to drive until I want it back; you pay gas and I pay repairs; just drive it once every week or two at the minimum and don't do anything stupid and take care of it and let me know asap if something needs fixing" I'd agree in a heartbeat.

Haha. I think a lot of people would. My mom and her husband would be the option. Somehow I don't think I could ask to park it next to his electric car. So, I am trying to mentally let go of wanting my car.

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #23 on: July 14, 2014, 10:16:22 PM »
Sell the car.  Put the proceeds in a special investment account that doesn't mix with your other funds.

One day when you can afford the parking and insurance again, cash out that special account and buy a similar car.

I do have quite a bit of dread about any future car purchase.

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #24 on: July 14, 2014, 11:51:43 PM »
I want to be able to call myself a real Mustachian. I think I need some encouragement and probably face punches as well.

Problem: I have a gorgeous 1967 Mustang. I'd estimate it gets 10 miles per gallon.

PROS: Looks amazing, sounds like Aslan roaring Narnia into existence, intoxicating old car smell, is fast, popular, has gotten me free beer for existing and free maintenance for the chance to touch it. It is a sexy dream car and I own it free and clear.

CONS: Insanely gas guzzling, outrageous death trap, requires parking spot, new parts are expensive and it could always use them, requires insurance, has to be washed constantly, isn't a practical vehicle for any place I ever plan to live.

I wanted to keep it so DW the mechanic could make a project of it, but I know we won't have money for a garage or a project anytime soon. I know my car makes the earth sad and I would be wealthier without it, but I feel emotional about letting it go. I want to fully believe car-free is the way to be. I want to replace my love for my clown car with happy dreams of a super cool moped.

Extra info: My deployment is almost done, and I have less than a year left in the military. I live about 6 miles from work.

P.S. Despite having old man problems, I am actually a lady.


Wow, I'd have a hard time letting this car go too as it's one of my "dream" cars so-to-speak. The way I have kept myself from owning these classic cars is by enjoying them at car shows -- which are free and kind of fun. That way I enjoy them and see them often but don't have the expenses that go with them. :)
« Last Edit: July 15, 2014, 12:18:42 AM by marketboss76 »

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #25 on: July 15, 2014, 02:17:13 AM »
The way I have kept myself from owning these classic cars is by enjoying them at car shows -- which are free and kind of fun. That way I enjoy them and see them often but don't have the expenses that go with them. :)

True. It isn't as if I have a true need to see it every single day. I do actually enjoy car shows.

skunkfunk

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #26 on: July 21, 2014, 11:38:52 AM »

I'd also swap the engine and probably transmission to something modern; the old 289 looks beautiful, but let's be honest. It gets 10 miles to the gallon if you're lucky. I can replace that V8 with a 2.0 L 4-cylinder turbocharged engine, get 40 MPG, and put out more power. I love the classic look, but efficiency and power have both improved; I can get about 5x the efficiency which I can spend on a combination of fuel usage and power. (Don't worry, I wouldn't get a tiny 2.0 L for mine - I'd rather go for something meaner, less fuel efficient, and more powerful.)


You'll never get 40 mpg in that thing. It's not anywhere near as aerodynamic as a modern car, and if you keep it under highway speeds I'm betting you get somewhere in the mid-20s with a great turbo 4-cylinder setup. If you have a heavy foot, less. Best power per dollar improvement is probably some modifications to the 289, at-home cylinder head porting and a camshaft and whatnot. 

frugaliknowit

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #27 on: July 21, 2014, 01:28:18 PM »
Don't get me wrong, I loooooooooooooooooove classic mustangs!  When I was a lad, I drove a 65 convertible with a 4-speed stick (friend's father's car) and when you hit the gas that thing flies!!!

Here's the thing:  The world has changed.  The middle class workers' "share of the pie" has shrunken due to the decline of unionism and the internationalization of the workforce.  If we want to live well financially, we cannot afford much in the way of "toys".

Classic cars are toys.  If you care about your financial future, get rid of it (sell it to a "1%er" and get over it (hug).

daverobev

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #28 on: July 21, 2014, 01:55:50 PM »
Don't get me wrong, I loooooooooooooooooove classic mustangs!  When I was a lad, I drove a 65 convertible with a 4-speed stick (friend's father's car) and when you hit the gas that thing flies!!!

Here's the thing:  The world has changed.  The middle class workers' "share of the pie" has shrunken due to the decline of unionism and the internationalization of the workforce.  If we want to live well financially, we cannot afford much in the way of "toys".

Classic cars are toys.  If you care about your financial future, get rid of it (sell it to a "1%er" and get over it (hug).

No, not at all. We are so so so rich. People can have hobby cars, or whatever, if they want and can afford it. You can live on $10k a year easily if you own a modest home; anything above that can be spent on what you want.

Got $20k passive income and want to spend $8k on a classic car every year? Go for it. We have produce from the other side of the world available year round. We live better than kings and queens of a couple of hundred years go, while on the poverty line.

Is it.... wise to blow all that money on a hobby if it is money you have no other need for, and you get value from it? Yes, really, it is.

gimp

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #29 on: July 21, 2014, 02:15:44 PM »
You'll never get 40 mpg in that thing. It's not anywhere near as aerodynamic as a modern car, and if you keep it under highway speeds I'm betting you get somewhere in the mid-20s with a great turbo 4-cylinder setup. If you have a heavy foot, less. Best power per dollar improvement is probably some modifications to the 289, at-home cylinder head porting and a camshaft and whatnot.

I won't, but I'll get something better than 8. I'm not worried - I'll learn what I need when I start screwing around later.

southern granny

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #30 on: July 21, 2014, 02:21:59 PM »
I have a 70 mustang fastback.  Its not a daily driver.  But I decided way back to keep it.  I was feeling guilty about it until some great people on here suggested that the money for the car come out of my entertainment/hobby budget instead of transportation.  Somehow that made me feel less guilty about it.  I vote for keeping the car.

T-Rex

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #31 on: July 21, 2014, 10:14:39 PM »
I'm surprised how many of you suggest keeping it. I feel like if it was a big stupid lifted pickup truck nobody in this thread would advocate it, haha. This has been a nice exercise since you all truly have similar feelings to me, but I want to disagree.

skunkfunk

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #32 on: July 22, 2014, 08:29:27 AM »
I'm surprised how many of you suggest keeping it. I feel like if it was a big stupid lifted pickup truck nobody in this thread would advocate it, haha. This has been a nice exercise since you all truly have similar feelings to me, but I want to disagree.

I suggested keeping it because I've done the same thing. My old firebird mostly sits in the garage, waiting for the day that I can retire and learn to weld and paint.

DeepEllumStache

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #33 on: July 22, 2014, 09:04:12 AM »
I have a 70 mustang fastback.  Its not a daily driver.  But I decided way back to keep it.  I was feeling guilty about it until some great people on here suggested that the money for the car come out of my entertainment/hobby budget instead of transportation.  Somehow that made me feel less guilty about it.  I vote for keeping the car.

+1

It comes down to how you value and find balance your FI date with the rest of your life.  Austerity is a great idea but if it makes you absolutely miserable and the decisions keep you up at night... maybe you're cutting out too much of your life. 

I recommend tracking the total costs of the car (insurance, gas, maintenance, parking, returns on the money you could get for selling the car, etc) to give you a better idea of what the true cost trade off you are making.  Can you afford it?  Will you regret selling the car?  Will you regret the impact to your FI date?

If the tradeoff is worth it to you both financially and emotionally, then mark your Mustang down as entertainment/hobby and figure out how to love it with the least amount of costs.  If the costs are too high, then sell the car.

Barbaebigode

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Re: Facepunch Time: How can I let go of feelings for my cool clown car?
« Reply #34 on: July 22, 2014, 09:34:25 AM »
Well, although this "if you love it, then go for it" way of thinking seems to be hyping in the MMM's forum lately (I’m a long time lurker), I wonder what if, hypothetically the thing you love is yachting, or wearing jewerly, or eating at fine expensive restaurants, or all of those things combined? Would it still be wise to spend a lot of money and compromise a chunk of your budget just because those are things you love? That would sound exactly like a type of excuse heard more often in the “antimustachian wall of shame and comedy” section of this forum.

Frugality is not about deprivation, is about having your level of happiness not heavily dependant on material stuff. I think ideally you should try to find happiness elsewhere and not in a car. Maybe a new inexpensive hobby? Have you considered something like that? Is it feasible?

BTW, keeping a toycar in a high COL area under a “modest income” sounds bad. I hope you find happiness on the frugal side (and obviously ditching the car in the process).

Was it facepunchy enough?